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NINETEEN HUNDRED SIXTY- SIX 



BOSTON COLLEGE 




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CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ACADEMIC 17 

UNDERCLASS 79 

ACTIVITIES 123 

SPORTS 169 

FEATURES 225 

GRADUATES 265 










THOMAS P. TORRISI 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 



CHRISTIAN H. EIDT 



BUSINESS MANAGER 



THOMAS M. WELLS 



MANAGING EDITOR 





Miss Diane Armitage 
Queen of the 1966 Sub Turri 




Miss Mary Halligan 

Queen of the Junior Prom 



Miss Judith Burns 

Homecoming Queen of 1966 





The Highwaymen at Homecoming 




Ullet and Hendra at Homecoming 




Lionel Hampton at the Mardi Gras Ball 




Dave Brubeck during Winter Weekend 





The primary objective of any University is the "carry- 
over" of classroom learning into real life, the application 
of the knowledge of the past to the existential situation 
of the present. Boston College is precisely dedicated to 
this goal; "Ever to Excel" connotes all that such an edu- 
cational program implies . . . 





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. . . an understanding of the unity 
of knowledge, an appreciation of our cultural heritage, a 
dedication to the advancement of learning and a sense of 
personal and social responsibility — both within the 
University and throughout the community. . . . 



10 





Boston College approaches these educational objectives 
in a unique way, the way of the Catholic University, an 
institution dedicated to the quest for knowledge, but 
within the context of committed communal life. Thus, 
although she consists of twelve colleges, including five 
post-graduate and professional schools, Boston College 
rigorously maintains its core of liberal education. In 
order to become an educated and committed Christian 
in society, . . . 






13 




. . . one must deal with the existential questions 
of Being and Becoming in their proper sequence. Boston 
College has attained its position as "the major Catholic 
institution of higher education" by first leading the stu- 
dent to an understanding of what he is, so that he can 
become a committed member of society. It is in this en- 
lightenment that Boston College has excelled; it is for this 
fact that her alumni have actively shaped today' s Christian 
community. 




14 






15 




... A Lusty Winter 
Frosty, but Kindly, 

— As you like it. 



16 



ACADEMICS 



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A university consists of essentially 
three elements; a library, students, 
and professors. 

It is to the professional element 
that this section of the Sub Turri is 
dedicated. To those professors 
whose pictures follow and to their 
numerous colleagues, all students at 
Boston College owe incalculable 
appreciation. It is due to their efforts 
that each of us has been able to ap- 
proach his academic discipline in a 
structured manner and to attain some 
competence in specific fields of 
inquiry. Also, it was partially due 
to their inspiration, insight, and 
background that we, who entered 
with parochial perspectives, began 
to inquire, question and accept or 
reject various ideas and values that 
shall play an integral role in our 
future. 




Very Reverend Michael P. Walsh, S.J. 

President 



UNIVERSITY 
ADMINISTRATION 




Rev. Lawrence A. Dorr, S.J. 
Executive Assistant to the President 




Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J. 
Academic Vice President 



19 




Rev. Francis B. McManus, S.J. 
Secretary of the University 




Rev. Thomas Fleming, S.J. 

Financial Vice President and Treasurer 




Rev. Edmond D. Walsh, SJ. 
Director of Admissions 




Rev. John F. Fitzgerald, S.J. 
Registrar of the University 





Rev. John E. Murphy, S.J. 
Business Manager 




Rev. Brendan C. Connolly, S.J. 
Director of Libraries 




Rev. George L. Dniry. SJ. 

Director of Student Personnel Service 




Rev. Edward J. Hanrahan, S.J. 
Director of Resident Students 



23 





Henry J. McMahon 
Assistant Dean 



Rev. John R. Willis, SJ. 
Dean 




24 



Weston M. Jenks 
Director of Guidance 



COLLEGE 



OF ARTS 



AND 



SCIENCE 




Rev. John A. Hinchey, S.J. 
Dean of Men 




Rev. Richard G. Shea, S.J. 
Student Counselor 




Eileen M. Tosney 

Registrar 




Rev. W. Seavey Joyce, S.J. 
Dean 





Christopher J. Flynn, Jr. 
Assistant Dean 




26 



Julie A. Bain 
Registrar 




Rev. Alfred J. Jolson, S.J. 
Associate Dean 



COLLEGE OF 

BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 




Rev. John St. John, S.J. 
Spiritual Counselor 




Rev. George F. Lawlor, S.J. 
Director of Guidance 




Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J. 
Dean 





Rev. Robert F. Hoey, S.J. 
Assistant Dean 



Elizabeth A. Strain 
Registrar 



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SCHOOL 
OF 
EDUCATION 




Raymond J. Martin 
Director of Student Teaching 




Rev. Francis X. Weiser, S.J. 
Spiritual Counsellor 




Mary T. Kinnane 
Dean of Women 



29 



SCHOOL 

OF 
NURSING 




Rita P. Kelleher, R.N., M.Ed. 
Dean 




30 



Pauline R. Sampson, R.N., M.Ed. 
Administrative Assistant to the Dean 




Katherine McQueeney 
Registrar 




Rev. Edward J. Gorman, S.J. 
Student Counselor 



31 




EVENING 
COLLEGE 



Rev. Charles M. Crowley, S.J. 
Dean 




32 



Katharine M. Hastings, A.M. 
Registrar 




FACULTY 



33 




Arthur L. Glynn, LL.B., M.B.A., C.P.A. 
Chairman 



The Accounting Division of the College of Business Admin- 
istration is considered by many to be one of the most pro- 
gressive in the University. By necessity, it is a department in 
flux for it is constantly trying to keep abreast of the rapid 
changes of the modern business world. 

According to Department Chairman Arthur L. Glynn, the 
Division's goal is to provide business students with a "better 
concept of quantitative problems." 

At the elementary level, the Department employed visual 
aids to instruct the student in current accounting procedure. 
Too, the experimental "Control" course, begun three years 
ago, is now required for all sophomores in the Department. 

The Department recognizes the benefits to be derived from 
experience outside of the classroom and encourages its stu- 
dents to seek as much practical accounting experience as possible. 



ACCOUNTING 





John A. Humphrey, M.B.A. 




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34 



Richard A. Bruno, M.B.A. , C.P.A. 



BUSINESS 
LAW 





Vincent A. Harrington, M.B.A., LL.B. 



William B. Hickey, M.Ed., LL.M. 
Acting Chairman 



A businessman whether he be associated with a large corpo- 
ration or an independent merchant must be aware of the legal 
system which affects the nation's commerce, and thus his 
interests. 

The Business Law Department in the College of Business 
Administration aims at clarifying legal business problems for 
the student. Departmental course offerings include general 
survey courses and more specialized courses in such fields as 
insurance and real estate law. 

This year William B. Hickey has been named Acting Chair- 
man of Business Law, replacing former Chairman James 
E. Shaw. 




Philip F. Garity, A.B., LL.M. 



35 




Rev. William D. Sullivan, SJ. 
Chairman 



BIOLOGY 



In the last decade the Biology Department has expanded 
from a department oriented exclusively toward training mem- 
bers for the health professions to encompass the entire field of 
Biology down to the molecular level. From one floor in Devlin 
Hall the Biology Department will expand to cover over one- 
half of the new Science Building. The new space will provide 
needed laboratory space and classrooms in addition to needed 
research facilities for an expanded faculty. 

Due to the increasing emphasis on Quantitative Biology, 
the Department has tailored its program to include courses in 
Physical Chemistry, Physics, and Calculus. The basic Qualita- 
tive Biological curriculum including Cytology, Physiology, 
Biochemistry, and Histology have been expanded to include 
Endocrinology, Radiation, Biology, and Immunology. In 
addition there is ample opportunity within the department for 
undergraduate research. 

Besides this expanded undergraduate program the depart- 
ment has branched out in the past four years by doubling the 
number of students in its Masters Program and by recently 
instituting a Doctoral Program. 




Jolane Solomon, Ph.D. 



36 




Walter J. Fimian, Jr., Ph.D. 




Yu-chen Ting, Ph.D. 




James J. Gilroy, Ph.D. 



37 



CHEMISTRY 



Progress through chemistry has done much to shape the 
features of the modern world. New and striking advances in 
the technological development have further increased the im- 
portant part that chemistry plays in the life of the average 
person. New discoveries have been made in such diverse 
fields as medicine, war and space, contributing to the perfec- 
tion of the human condition and furthering the progress of 
society as a whole. 

Under the able directorship of Dr. O'Malley, now on leave 
to M.I.T., and Dr. Andre de Bethune, acting chairman, the 
Qiemistry Department is involved in a continuous self-study, 
and a program of change and development. New facilities 
have become available to the department in partial fulfillment 
of their long-range objectives for expansion. 

Undergraduate majors are taught the fundamentals and 
theories of science before they are allowed participation in the 
upper division electives which cover a wide-range of chemical 
interests. These undergraduates are being encouraged to do 
individual research under the guidance of the faculty members 
and supported by generous grants given by the National Sci- 
ence Foundation. 

The Chemistry Department of Boston College has gained 
a fine reputation throughout the country, and through the 
continuance of dynamic leadership and farsightedness, the 
department will maintain and further their excellent standards. 




Richard A. Durst, Ph.D. 

Andre J. deBethune, Ph.D. 
Acting Chairman 




38 




David C. O'Donnell, Ph. D. 




Neil B. Jurinski, Ph.D. 




Rev. John R. Trzaska, S.J. 



Timothy E. McCarthy, Ph.D. 




39 




ECONOMICS 



Rev. Robert J. McEwen, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 

The addition of new faculty members plus the accelerated 
structure of the Economics program have given the depart- 
ment a new perspective. New faculty members are teaching 
primarily in the Graduate School, enhancing the department's 
already fine rating. 

Under the new curriculum a substantial number of freshmen 
are taking the Principles of Economics, many of whom plan 
on major concentration in this field. The department believes 
this is a very important step forward, for starting the major 
program in Economics in Freshman year will make it possible 
for students to do much more advanced work in their senior 
year. Students who are admitted to the honors program in the 
department may be able to take graduate courses in their 
senior year. 

Under the new curriculum every student is required to take 
one course in the social sciences. Consequently, this academic 
year has seen over 500 undergraduates studying the Principles 
course in fulfillment of this requirement. Fr. Robert J. Mc- 
Ewen, Chairman of the Department, believes that an introduc- 
tion to one of the social sciences should be a part of a liberal 
education, in the hope that this background will assist the 
student to function more intelligently and effectively as citizens 
of a modern world. 





Miss Ann Friedlaender 




Vincent E. Dunfey, A.M. 



40 



Charles J. Scully, A.M. 





Conrad P. Caligaris, Ph.D. 



Donald J. White, Ph.D. 




Ahce E. Bourneuf, Ph.D. 




Harold A. Peterson, Ph.D. 




Kanta Marwah, Ph.D. 



41 



CLASSICS 



For the past six years the development of the Classics 
Department has been in the hands of Fr. Robert Healey, who 
describes the purpose of the department as two-fold. Primarily, 
it trains students who major in classics to analyze texts and to 
be knowledgeable in the cultural and historical background 
that circumscribe the texts. 

In observing the graduate and post-graduate records com- 
piled by students of this department, one can only say that 
success has come in large measure. Many students have attained 
admission and received fellowships to the best graduate schools 
in this area of study. Within the past three years, for example, 
the department has had three Marshall Scholars. Furthermore, 
many past students have built solid scholarly reputations, 
having published in the respected national and international 
journals. 

The Classics Department has not only turned its attention 
toward the development of the student majoring in the field. 
It also provides non-majors with a knowledge of the ancient 
texts, both in the original language and in translation. As such, 
the department fills an especially valuable function for the 
History and English departments. It introduces the non-major 
to the vast body of Greek and Roman culture that lies at the 
roots of Western civilizations. In taking on this inter-depart- 
mental perspective, the professors of classics teach such courses 
as Greek tragedy, Greek history. Biblical Latin, Plato and 
Aristotle. 




Joseph P. Maguire, Ph.D. 



Rev. Robert F. Healey, S.J. 
Chairman 



42 





John A. Jensen, D.Ed. 




Sr. M. Josephina, C.S.J., D.Ed. 



EDUCATION 



Pierre D. Lambert, Ph.D. 




43 




William M. Griffin, Ph.D. 




Vincent C. Nuccio, D.Ed. 




Stephen A. Paterna, B.S. 



Katharine H. Cotter, Ph.D. 





Anthony DeRosa, A.M. 




Raymond J. Martin, Ph.D. 



Stephen F. Roach, Ph.D. 



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45 




Robert P. O'Hara, Ph.D. 




Edwards J. Power, Ph.D. 



Mary O'Toole, A.M. 



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ENGLISH 




John L. Mahoney, Ph.D. 
Chairman 




One studies English hterature in order that he might under- 
stand the literary form as it deals with human and natural 
interactions. Concerning itself with this goal, the English 
Department at B.C. indirectly leads the student toward a more 
liberal and humane perspective in dealing with reality. What 
does all this mean ? 

Nothing more than saying that the department has excellent 
professors who convincihgly teach the literary works of the 
outstanding English writers. 

To accomplish this task, Dr. John Mahoney, chairman of 
the department, has instituted several new features besides 
the regular selection of electives. First, senior honors seminars 
treating John Donne and Jonathan Swift are now a reality. 
The student response to these has been excellent. A lecture 
series followed by informal conversations has also been realized. 

The faculty is compiled of men who balance their research 
activities with a deep interest in undergraduate teaching. 



Edward L. Hirsh, Ph.D. 



47 




Charles L. Regan, Ph.D. 




Leonard R. Casper, Ph.D. 




Robert Reiter, Ph.D. 




John F. Norton, A.M. 




John H. Randall, III, Ph.D. 



49 



FINANCE 



When discussing the operation of any economic system and, 
in particular, our free enterprise system, capital is a key term 
and the availability and prudent management of revenue is 
the foundation of any successful business organization. It is in 
this light that the Finance Department operates. By investi- 
gating the sources and control of revenue, the department 
exposes future bankers and corporation executives to a basis 
for sound fiscal management. 

Financial management presupposes at least a basic knowl- 
edge of investments and the tax structure. Such information is 
necessary in order that the profit necessary to maintain a busi- 
ness can be accurately calculated. Further problems are en- 
countered by a business engaged in international trade. This 
is due to the discrepancy in international monetary systems 
and foreign exchange. It is problems such as these that define 
the scope of the Finance Department's curriculum. 




Raymond J. Aherne, Ph.D. 




50 



Walter T. Greaney, Jr., Ph.D. 
Chairman of Department 




Josephine Von Henneberg, Litt. D. 
Chairman 





■"■-SI 
Allison Macomber 



FINE ARTS 



No man can claim to be "liberally educated" unless he has 
at least a basic understanding of the place of art and music in 
the life of man and society throughout history. Thus Fine Arts 
is an integral part of a true University. Although Fine Arts is 
a relatively new concept in the academic life of Boston College, 
it has grown rapidly. 

Only three years ago, the Fine Arts Dept. offered only 
several courses for Senior requirements. Since that time the 
Dept. has undergone a complete revitalization. The basic offer- 
ings of the Dept. have been expanded so as to offer a broad 
and ever growing program of electives. Though currently no 
major is offered in Fine Arts one will be offered upon com- 
pletion of the projected Fine Arts Center in the relatively 
near future. 

Boston College is fortunate in having several excellent pro- 
fessors, under the chairmanship of Dr. Josephine Von Henne- 
berg, in this department who will provide a solid core for the 
new Fine Arts Center. 

Of special note is the program of Mr. Macomber, the Artist- 
in-Residence. Mr. Macomber's program is basically a new con- 
cept in art education, utilizing what he refers to as a "studio 
apprenticeship." Begun as a pilot program three years ago, his 
classes now attract over 125 students, most of whom do not 
receive academic recognition for the courses which they take. 
Along with the other courses offered by the department, 
Mr. Macomber's art workshop is now enabling placement of 
Boston College graduates in the finest graduate schools of 
art and architecture in the United States. 



Eleanor J. Carlo, M.F.A. 



51 



HISTORY 




Thomas H. O'Connor, Ph.D. 




Joseph T. Criscenti, Ph.D. 



52 




One of the larger departments at Boston College, the History 
Department, offers various courses in Medieval Europe, Mod- 
ern Europe, Russia, the United States and Latin America. 
Under the direction of Chairman Thomas H. O'Connor, the 
department directs the studies of the History major to either 
graduate study or professional studies such as law, govern- 
ment, and foreign service. 

To accomplish these goals the department has made con- 
tinual efforts to improve its faculty and to update its program. 
Besides adding new major electives, such as the History of 
Science, to the departmental studies, there has also been intro- 
duced for freshmen in the College of Arts and Sciences a new 
survey program. Most important, however, has been the 
experimentation with courses on an interdepartmental level. 
Courses in this category, such as the History of American Eco- 
nomic Development and the History of the Soviet Union given 
in conjunction with the Economics, the Russian and East Euro- 
pean Center respectively, have been enthusiastically received. 

In sum, it is the constant endeavor of the history depart- 
ment to make the events of the past meaningful to man both 
in the present and future. 



Thomas W. Perry, Ph.D. 




John R. Betts, Ph.D. 




Rev. Henry A. Callahan, S.J. 



53 




GEOLOGY 



The aim of the Geology Department is to enable the student 
to obtain a thoroughly sound background for whatever area of 
Earth Science he may choose for concentrated study. Students 
gain a solid basis in Chemistry, Physics and Earth Science in 
their first three years and concentrate in the specialized fields 
of Geology in Senior year. 

Despite the small size of the Department, the faculty has 
been engaged in the past year in a number of research projects 
extending from the Western Sahara of Africa to Nova Scotia 
to the Pacific Northwest. Many Senior students spend their 
summers and parts of the academic year working on these 
projects, thus providing the student with practical knowledge 
that will be invaluable to him. This is in accordance with the 
policy of the Department — to stress the quantitative aspects 
of earth science technique rather than the qualitative ones. 

In order to keep pace with its growth and expansion, next 
year the Geology Department will have at its disposal over 
half of Devlin Hall. This will provide the facilities for scholar- 
ship and research for which it has been waiting for five years. 



George G. Brown, Jr., Ph.D. 



Rev. James W. Skehan, S.J. 
Chairman 




54 



INTER-DEPARTMENTAL 

PROGRAM 




Leon Smolensk!, Ph.D. 
Lawrence G. Jones, Ph.D. 



In order to facihtate the study of particular fields of knowl- 
edge not covered by single departments, several inter-depart- 
mental programs have been instituted in the past several years. 
Such is the nature of the Latin American Studies, Linguistics, 
and Slavic Studies. The program most recently instituted, 
however, is the Russian and East European Center. This was 
opened in September of last year under the sponsorship of the 
United States Office of Education. According to its director. 
Dr. McNally, it is designed to encourage students to partici- 
pate in an inter-departmental program of Russian and East 
European studies. Foreseeing the increased needs and interest 
in this area, the Center is beginning its longe range aim to 
coordinate and expand course offerings in history, political 
science, economics, languages, and philosophy. Needless to 
say, the possibilities that are open to students who participate 
in the Center's program are numerous. Future careers that it 
opens include work in the State Department, intelligence 
agencies, research, college teaching, and foreign trade. 





Raymond T. McNally, Ph.D. 




Vladimir N. Bandera, Ph.D. 




Joseph T. Criscenti, Ph.D. 




Gerald F. Price, Ph.D. 
Chairman 



MARKETING 



The complexity and variety of goods now being produced 
in this country requires a careful scientific investigation of 
available markets. Marketing research relies heavily upon the 
studies of consumer by behavioral scientists, and anticipates 
future needs dictated by fluctuating economic and social con- 
ditions. Statistical analysis is also an invaluable tool for deter- 
mining the extent of any market. 

We can see therefore, that the marketing specialist must be 
well drilled in influencing consumer habits. The marketing 
department attempts to acquaint the business student with the 
many sophisticated tools of the marketing profession by 
demanding student research into actual industrial needs and 
policies. Experience gained in this manner makes the Market- 
ing major all the more valuable to the business world which 
awaits him. 





Henry P. McDonald, A.M. 



Joseph E. Devine, M.B.A. 




Joseph D. O'Brien, Ph.D. 



57 




MATHEMATICS 



Rev. Stanley J. Bezuszka, S.J., Ph.D. 
Chairman 



The importance of mathematics has become increasingly 
significant in an ever more complex age. The growth of the 
Mathematics Department in the past few years mirrors this 
importance. Its professors have been engaged in a number of 
research projects sponsored by the National Science Founda- 
tion and the United. States Air Force. In the near future, a 
Ph.D. program will be added to the Master of Arts program. 
Fr. Bezuska has again received government grants for his 
continued work with the Boston College Mathematics institute. 

The undergraduate Mathematics major has the opportunity 
of choosing courses within a wide mathematical spectrum. 
Courses range from the purely theoretical such as numerical 
and vector analysis to the practical courses in computer pro- 
gramming and mathematical statistics. This core of discipline 
is complemented by a liberal arts background thus preparing 
the student for further works on the graduate level or for a 
career in the business world. 




Rene J. Marcou, Ph.D. 




58 



Joseph A. Sullivan, Ph.D. 




Nabil Khabbaz, Ph.D. 




John P. Shanahan, Ph.D. 





Normand R. Cartier 



MODERN LANGUAGES 




John C. Conway, A.M. 



60 




Rev. Joseph D. Gauthier, S.J. 



Under the masterful direction of Professor Cartier, the 
Modern Languages Department this year has assumed an aura 
of dynamism indicative of the tremendous progress being 
achieved on both the academic and administrative levels. This 
progress has been most vividly displayed in the recent fruition 
of numerous programs and projects which, up until this time, 
have been only embryonic in nature. 

Two of these programs deserve special mention in that 
they exemplify the pioneering efforts which are fast becoming 
characteristic of the department as a whole. The first is the 
new Master of Arts program in German which is expected to 
be completed by the opening of classes in 1967, and parallel 
to the German program in development and almost equal to 
it in objective is the present Italian master's program, which 
will have attained the level of doctorate studies by 1967. 

To assist in the development of these projects and to en- 
rich more fully the intellectual reserve upon which students 
may draw, a number of highly distinguished professors has 
been recently added to the permanent faculty. 

In brief, the Modern Languages Department is presently 
proving itself to be one of the most ambitious and progressive 
departments on campus, functioning both with an eye to the 
continual advancement of man's cultural knowledge and in 
dedicated pursuit of the intellectually active minds. 




Lawrence G. Jones, Ph.D. 



61 





MILITARY 
SCIENCE 



Organized in 1947 under the late Major General James M. 
Lewis and now headed by Colonel John L. Murphy, the Boston 
College R.O.T.C. Brigade has trained over twelve hundred 
students to be Army officers. In offering Boston College stu- 
dents the opportunity to become commissioned officers, the 
R.O.T.C. program confers a dual responsibility upon the Mili- 
tary Science Department: that of training soldiers and develop- 
ing leaders. In realizing this goal, the R.O.T.C. Brigade assists 
not only in fulfilling the needs of the nation, but also enables 
students to meet their personal obligations of military service. 

Military science, as a science, has changed radically in its 
way of looking at the world. In the last half decade, for exam- 
ple, America's concept of national preparedness has changed 
from an outlook based on massive retaliation in total war to 
one based on a much more versatile and quickly moving war 
machine, geared toward limited conflicts. Thus, practically speak- 
ing, the Military Science Department at Boston College must 
adequately prepare its students for the gradual and continuing 
changes that affect our military establishment. 





62 




Anne Marie McPeak, R.N., B.S. 



NURSING 




Harriet P. Primmer, R.N., M.S. 




Barbara R. Hermann, R.N., M.S. 



63 




Helen Kumpan, R.N., M.Ed. 




M. Paula Fellows, R.N., M.S. 




Elizabeth M. Grady, R.N., M.S. 



64 




Joyce M. Dwyer, R.N., M.S. 




Phyllis V. Bromwell, R.N., M.Ed. 




Patricia A. Stockman, R.N., M.S. 




Eileen M. Ryan, R.N., M.S. 



65 




joan F. Mullahy, R.N., M.S. 





Phyllis H. Green, R.N., A.M. 




Eleanore F. Voorhies, R.N., A.M. 



Marie S. Andrews, R.N., M.S. 



PHILOSOPHY 




Integral to the liberal arts tradition in any university is a 
Philosophy Department. Since Boston College is a Jesuit Uni- 
versity, it is natural that the framework of Thomistic meta- 
physical realism be employed in treating the problems and 
history of philosophy. It is through such a framework that 
Boston College maintains its Catholic commitments and, at 
the same time, "develops in the student an awareness of and 
sympathy for any great ideas from the world of men." 

While maintaining its traditional commitments, the Philoso- 
phy Department, under the direction of Fr. Joseph Flanagan, 
S.J., has made a number of major changes. Besides initiating 
a new doctoral program, the department has introduced a 
broad field of courses to be elected freely by undergraduates 
of all schools. Also, the undergraduate of the future can expect 
to benefit from visiting scholars, lecture series, and cross- 
disciplinary seminars. 



Rev. Joseph Flanagan, S.J. 
Chairman 




Rev. Leo A. Reilly, S.J. 




William E. Carlo, Ph.D. 



67 





Rev. Richard T. Murphy, S.J. 




Donald A. Gallagher, Ph.D. 




Rev. E. M. McKinnon, SJ. 




Rev. William E. FitzGerald, S.J. 




Joseph L. Navickas, Ph.D. 




Frederick E. White, Ph.D. 
Chairman 



PHYSICS 




Edward V. Jezak, Ph.D. 




Robert L. Becker, Ph.D. 

The science orientation of the modern world has been to a 
great degree, directed by the study of physics. In areas as 
differing as nuclear research and earth satellites to the planned 
high speed railways physics has contributed to the revolutionary 
changes we take as commonplace. 

In order to prepare the Boston College student for graduate 
study and careers in any of the various specific fields associated 
with physics, the department places a great emphasis upon a 
well rounded curriculum which centers around a moderate 
number of core courses which are required for a degree. In 
addition, each semester a course in laboratory technique is 
integrated with one of the core courses so that the student will 
see theory applied and verified. 

Under the chairmanship of Doctor Frederick White there 
has been a greater correlation with the mathematics depart- 
ment in order to demonstrate to the student the application of 
calculus to physics. In all courses, the theoretical aspect is 
stressed; concrete considerations of an engineering type are 
left to graduate work. 

Higgins Hall, the new science building to be completed in 
the fall, will house a new accelerator, in addition to existing 
laboratory equipment. This long-awaited improvement in 
scientific facilities points towards a promising future for phys- 
ics at Boston College. 




Rev. Francis A. Liuima, S.J. 



70 




POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 



The growing complexities of the American and foreign 
political scenes and the development of government every- 
where are nowhere better appreciated than in the Political 
Science Department. To achieve a basic understanding and 
clarification of this tremendous growth are fundamental ob- 
jectives of this department. It is not designed to produce the 
professional politician, but rather to foster a thorough back^ 
ground in political ideas and ideals, in order to prepare the 
student for such endeavors as government, law, teaching, and 
other related fields. 

Student majors, beginning with an introductory course, are 
then allowed to pursue their interests in a wide spectrum of 
upper division courses while at the same time being allowed 
much latitude for the selection of other social science courses. 
The end result is a student, knowledgeable in the theory and 
practice of government and well versed in the problems and 
complexities of the entire man within the framework of his 
society. 



Paul T. Heffron, Ph.D. 




Peter S. H. Tang, Ph.D. 




Robert E. Gilbert, Ph.D. 



71 




PRODUCTION 






Albert J. Simone, Ph.D. 



According to Production Chairman, Justin C. Cronin, the 
object of his department is two-fold: "To provide a working 
knowledge of the production function of business from the 
point of view of the businessman who is responsible for the 
successful management of its organization, operation, and 
control; and to impart an appreciation of the problems faced 
by top-level management with a second philosophy that may 
be utilized in their solution." 

To realize these goals the Production Department offers 
courses such as Operation Research and Production Controls. 
The student is encouraged to participate in actual operations 
and to research simulated problems in the field. Special em- 
phasis is placed on statistical analysis and the use of electronic 
data processing for the determination of optimum production 
conditions. 




Justin C. Cronin, M.B.A. 
Chairman 




Rev. James F. Moynihan, S.J. 
Chairman 



PSYCHOLOGY 



The Psychology Department has been rapidly growing since 
its rather recent inception, in order to meet university needs. 
The department has been striving to satisfy both the require- 
ments of the majors, who acquire a thorough undergraduate 
training in the various fields of psychology in preparation for 
further graduate school work, and non-majors, who adhering 
to the principles of a liberal arts education, have the oppor- 
tunity to elect various psychology courses offered. 

Looking a year ahead to the promised opening of the Social 
Science Building, the Department plans to begin a doctoral 
program. Included in these plans are the hiring of new facul- 
ty, and consequent expansion of the undergraduate program. 

Fr. Moynihan, the present chairman of the department, is 
retiring at the end of this academic year, and will be replaced 
by Dr. Von Felsinger, presently a professor in the department. 

Dr. Cautella has recently been elevated to the status of full 
professor. He has been very much involved in the relatively 
new behavior therapy of reciprocal inhibition, and has trav- 
eled extensively in the past year to attend seminars and give 
lectures regarding the subject. 




Harold N. Kellner, Ph.D. 



73 



The undergraduate program in Sociology is designed with 
special emphasis being given to students planning graduate 
work in sociology or in social work. The introductory course 
provides the student with a background in the fundamental 
facts, problems, and the structure of American society in prep- 
aration for more advanced courses. 

The Sociology Department finds itself continually growing 
in an attempt to meet the social enigmas of our growing 
technocracy, and changing social mores, while at the same time 
laying stress upon an expanding faculty membership in order 
to increase both their depth and fine reputation. Several new 
faculty members, (both part time and full time) have been 
added this year to the staff giving outstanding evidence to the 
department's vitality. 

The Sociology Department at this time, in the person of the 
individual faculty members, is now involved in many excellent 
and worth'tt'hile projects and studies. The Chairman of the 
department, John D. Donovan, is on leave this year as a 
Visiting Research Professor at the University of Louvain, 
Belgium. Dr. Buford Rhea, Acting Chairman, along with 
Dr. Williams, is director of a project investigating the impact 
of school structure on student's orientation supported by the 
Office of Education, Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare. 




Rev. Joseph Hoc, S.J. 




Buford Rhea, Ph.D. 

Acting Chairman 



SOCIOLOGY 





Madeleine D. Giguere, A.M. 



74 



L. K. Richards, Ph.D. 




i 



John H. Lawton, Ph.D. 
Qiairman 




Paul Marcoux, Ph.D. 



The Speech Department is one of the smallest in the uni- 
versity in terms of student majors, and faculty, but one of the 
largest in its range of activities. The department can be broken 
into three different areas of concentration — speech, forensics, 
and dramatics. 

Unique in the first area, the Speech Program is the combined 
Speech-English major, which prepares the student for high 
school certification in both subjects. An extensive survey of 
high schools throughout the Northeast showed the need for 
a field of concentration of this type. 

Closely connected with the Speech Department, are the many 
forensic activities within the university. In addition to the 
Fulton Debating Society, a recent program within the depart- 
ment has sponsored groups of students in forensic events 
before civic groups throughout the Boston area. 

During its one hundredth season, the Dramatic Society has 
received much-deserved acclaim. The year's productions are 
from seven authors, from Shakespeare to Albee. Also in the 
dramatic arts area is a concentration upon oral interpretation of 
literature. Public performances have included a readers' theatre 
adaptation of Lorraine Hansburg's A Raisin in the Sun and a 
combined program with the University Chorale on the English 
Renaissance. 



Rev. Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. 



SPEECH 





Rev. William J. Leonard, S.J. 
Chairman 



Rev. J. Frank Devine, S.J. 



THEOLOGY 



During our stay at Boston College an historic event pro- 
foundly affected the thinking of the Church — the Second 
Vatican Council. Some of the great minds of our age struggled 
with the problem of Christianity's relevance in the modern 
world. Responding to the challenges and solutions being 
wrought in Rome, the Theology Department assumed much 
of the Council's spirit. Under Fr. Casey and now Fr. Leonard 
(who was privileged in attending Council sessions) admirable 
developments have occurred. Broad new programs have grown 
out of the patient collaborations of religious and lay profes- 
sors in Self-Study meetings. 

Perhaps the most important of the new steps of the The- 
ology Department is the innovation of senior electives into the 
reconstructed core curriculums. Examples of these electives 
range from Church and State relations in the United States to 
patterns of Contemporary Christian Involvement, and Euchar- 
istic Practice in the Early Church. A theologian-in-residence 
and a lecture series are other additions to the Theology Depart- 
ment's new program. 

In all, these attempts can only aid the vital theological 
rethinking that marks our times. While many of these ideas 
will bear fruit only after today's students have left Boston 
College, we have witnessed important beginnings. Change has 
been the key word in the Theology Department during the 
past year. 




76 







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Rev. James J. Casey, S.J. 




Brian J. Cudahy, Ph.D. , Thomas J. Owens, Ph.D. 



77 




Rev. Miles L. Fay, S.J. 





Rev. Joseph P. Carew, S.J. 



Rev. Frederick L. Moriarty, S.J. 



UNDERCLASS 



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Demonstrations in front of St. 
Mary's, the Modern Man Honors 
Program, gradual implementa- 
tion of academic changes brought 
about through course evaluation, 
and university-wide elimination of 
compulsory class attendance: these 
facts illustrate the spirit of change 
that affects the underclassmen of the 
University. As students they are 
eager to change the focus of educa- 
tional aims at Boston College, and 
they are ready to accept the inherent 
challenges of their struggle. 

Seniors complained as freshmen 
that a feeling of scholarship was not 
evident at Boston College. He or 
she looks at the underclass today 
and notes that an academic spirit 
indeed has been formed. And, 
though still struggling, this spirit 
has grown and matured, with the 
developing support of administra- 
tion and faculty. 

The underclassman can feel a 
pride today, not just in his achieve- 
ments at Boston College, but in his 
growth with Boston College. 







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ACTIVITIES 



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Collegiate life is characterized by 
a wide range of experience. Though 
the college's basic purpose is to pro- 
vide its students with sound aca- 
demic background, it cannot be its 
sole objective if it is to produce men 
and women who will function suc- 
cessfully in the world outside the 
academic community. 

The college student must find 
appropriate outlets for expressing 
his individuality. This is achieved to 
an enormous extent by participation 
in those extra-curricular activities 
which allow him to express himself 
in a manner consistent with his own 
personality and interests. 

Often it is the memories of these 
memberships — the friendships 
formed, the sense of achievement 
experienced, the disappointment, 
the joys, the lessons learned in 
human relations — which prove most 
meaningful. Often too, these activi- 
ties have formed the bases of careers 
in related fields. 

Therefore, since extra-curricular 
activities are an integral part of 
campus life, we present this survey. 




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The Campus Council, established in 1959, is the university- 
wide student government organization. It is the Council's 
responsibihty to co-ordinate all campus-wide social, cultural, 
and spiritual activities. Recently, it has undertaken the role of 
representing all Boston College students before the administra- 
tion and to those outside the B.C. community. Clearly this is 
the Council's most important role. 

Noting the trend of opinion favoring student representation 
through referendum, much of the Campus Council's policy- 
making will be more disposed to the influence of general 
student sentiment. 

This year the Council has sought to expand its usual scope 
of activity by establishing an Academic Affairs Committee, by 
studying the possibility of a student-controlled judicial system, 
and by constitutional recognition of the legislative Congress and 
the Inter-Class Councils. 

The Activities Committee, organized last year, has proved 
itself successful in guiding the Council's social role. The Coun- 
cil sponsored the Highwaymen at this year's Homecoming 
Concert, and is working in conjunction with the SubTurri to 
bring Miss Eileen Farrell, world-renowned soprano to the 
Chestnut Hill campus in the spring. 

Thus, the Campus Council can be seen as responsibly accept- 
ing the challenge placed upon it to pervade all aspects of 
student life. 

Chairman Kevin Weidling 

Vice-President Kevin Carmody 

Secretary Maureen Sullivan 

Treasurer Prince Walker 

Moderator Rev. Edward J. Gorman, S.J. 




CAMPUS 
COUNCIL 





124 




A&S SENATE 
I 




The Student Senate of the College of Arts & Sciences this 
year continues sponsorship of standing projects of interest and 
aid to its students. The Tutorial program is one of the most 
beneficial of these projects, having helped reduce the number 
of academic failures in the College by nearly fifty per cent. 
The Tobin Lecture every year brings to campus an outstanding 
authority in the field of foreign affairs, and the Arts & Sciences 
Newsletter informs students of campus events. Rounding out 
this series of standing projects is the Student Senate Scholar- 
ship, annually awarded to a deserving Senior in the College. 

In addition to its continued projects, the Senate this year 
furthered the Student Code, a systematic definition of the rights 
and duties of the student of Arts & Sciences in the classroom 
as well as his relation to the University community. 

Finally, the Senate introduced the freshman assistance pro- 
gram, in which upperclassmen of high academic standing 
undertake the guidance of ten freshmen in their major subjects, 
advising them in order to facilitate adjustment to Boston 
College. 





125 



CBA SENATE 



The Student Senate of the College of Business Adminis- 
tration embarked on a precedent setting course this past year 
under the Qiairmanship of Paul F. McCarthy. The general 
purpose behind all of the Senate's action was to communicate 
more satisfactorily with the student body by initiating the 
coordination of activities between commuting students and 
campus residents. This was implemented through the wide- 
spread distribution of literature outlining the actions of the 
Senate. 

Among the many activities that the Senate conducted with 
success were the University-wide Memorial Mass for the repose 
of the soul of the late president, John F. Kennedy, and several 
sponsored lectures which were enthusiastically received. An- 
other activity was the C.B.A. Award Banquet which is high- 
lighted by the Sullivan Award presented to the outstanding 
senior who best typifies the high caliber of the Business School 
student. 

In review, the 1965-66 session of the Student Senate was 
most productive and extremely rewarding to the student body 
and the College of Business Administration. It benefited the 
cultural as well as the academic life of all those who partici- 
pated. 






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126 




EDUCATION 
SENATE 




The aim of the 1965-66 School of Education Student Senate 
is to promote a better rapport between Student Government, 
the Student Body, and Administration. A precedent was set, 
as evidence of this rapport, when non-senate members were 
included on committee assignments. 

Chairman Robert Hayes appointed several investigatory 
committees designed to improve existing Senate functions and 
study proposed ones. Work done on these committees resulted 
in a Parents' Weekend to replace Parents' Day, a more organ- 
ized and efficient production of the traditional Skit Program, 
a thorough restudy of the Code of Ethics, and a reevaluation 
of the basic functions of Student Government. An Intellectual 
Contribution Committee was also established to study possible 
areas in which the Student Senate could make a significant 
contribution to the intellectual or professional aspect of the 
School of Education. Proposals being worked upon are a Lec- 
ture Series, Tutorial Program, and a Newsletter. 






NURSING SENATE 



The Nursing Student Organization provides an opportunity 
for the student body to express opinions on student matters 
and govern themselves in a democratic manner. All students 
and faculty of the School of Nursing are members of the 
organization. The organization's goals are to represent the 
student community in working with the faculty and administra- 
tion for the promotion of school and university interests, to 
promote leadership and school spirit among students, to main- 
tain school traditions and to contribute to the efficiency of 
school functions. 

The Student Senate which meets once a month, is the gov- 
erning body of the organization, and is composed of six 
selected officers and fourteen representatives from each class 
in the Nursing School. 

The student body as well as the faculty take great pride in 
their organization and the goals it is attaining. Within the 
organization there exist a number of committees which perform 
such functions as planning social activities, accepting nomina- 
tions and planning elections to class and organziation offices, 
and raising funds for the organization. 

President Mary Ellen Driscoll 

Vice-President Carroll Ferguson 

Treasurer Elizabeth Kelly 

Rec. Secretary Marie Mantos 

Moderator Rev. Edward J. Gorman, S.J. 





The Evening College is an integral part of the community. 
This is due chiefly to the effectiveness of its Student Council. 
Comprised of twenty-four members, the Council organizes and 
sponsors various academic and social events throughout the 
school year. 

This year's President, Anne McNichol, has the distinction 
of being the Council's first woman president. Under her leader- 
ship, the group devotes much of its time to planning activities 
which will be successful as a meaningful part of the Evening 
College students' collegiate life. This year. Council sponsored 
functions have included a Ski-Weekend and the Annual 
Christmas Party. 

Because of its spirit and hard work, the students of the 
Evening College are truly first class citizens of Boston College. 

President Anne M. McNichol 

Vice-President Pauline Roche 

Secretary M. Ellen Hallion 

Treasurer Charles Cody 




EVENING 
COLLEGE 




129 



This organization has undertaken, as its main concern, serv- 
ice to the male resident students of Boston College. It seeks 
to provide a more meaningful college experience for this 
element of the university. Consequently, all aspects of dormi- 
tory life are within the realm of its interests. Composed of 
representatives from each dormitory corridor, the Council 
sponsors such activities as intramural athletics, the Freshman 
Dormitory Students Orientation Program, and the Cheverus 
Club lectures. Social activities supported by the Council have 
included University mixers and the presentation of the Dave 
Brubek Concert during Winter Weekend. Informal dorm 
parties in the Roncalli lounge have aided in preserving the 
esprit de corps in an e^'er enlarging community which now 
exists on both sides of College Road. 

In addition, the Council works closely with Fr. Edward 
Hanrahan and the Administration thereby assuring that proper 
consideration will be given to the inevitable criticisms that 
arise in dormitory living. 

President Edward O'Reilly 

Vice-President Ralph Santopietro 

Secretary Philip McGovern 

Treasurer Stephen Miller 

Moderator Rev. John Caulfield, S.J 




COUNCIL OF 




RESIDENT MEN 




130 



W.R.A. 





The Women's Recreational Association of Boston College is 
a relatively new organization to the campus. Its purposes as 
set forth are to set high standards of conduct and sportsman- 
ship in all recreational activities, to create an interest in 
athletics among the women students of the university, and 
especially to create friendship and unity among the women of 
the Schools of Education and Nursing. 

The activities sponsored by the WRA for the 1965-1966 
academic year include : Basketball, Cheerleading, Co-ed Volley- 
ball, Fencing, Golf, Horseback Riding, Ice Skating, Modern 
Dance, Rifle Club, Sailing, Swimming and Tennis. All activi- 
ties are on an instructional level and a few have a varsity, 
intercollegiate standing. 

Special events sponsored by the WRA include a hayride 
and dance, a winter ski weekend, a whist party, and for the 
first time an awards banquet. 

WRA Board includes representatives of each sport and mem- 
bers of all classes in the Schools of Education and Nursing. 




President Mary Callahan 

Vice-President Denise Frigon 

Treasurer Teresa Farrell 

Secretary Cheryl O'Brien 

Moderator Miss T. Powell 



131 




I 

I 



MEN'S SODALITY 



Prefect Robert St. John 

Cell Leader Vincent Gallegher 

Cell Leader Michael Reavey 

Cell Leader Lee Casanelli 

Moderator Rev. J. Francis Devine, S.J. 



The Church of today exists in an age of change and activity 
unknown to previous centuries. As it has undergone serious 
examination and renewal, so has the Sodality. Yet the basic 
foundation of the Sodality — the desire to strengthen one's 
life as a Christian — has not shifted with the evolution of 
Christianity. At Boston College, the Sodality expresses its 
concern for the world in four areas: Campus, Community, 
Ecumenics, and International Affairs. 

The Campus cells have been active in implementing the 
liturgical changes suggested by the Vatican Council. In their 
program of "Fourteen Flicks" the Sodality has attempted to 
present films of outstanding quality to the cultural life of the 
campus. 

In the Community, the challenge of the Roxbury slums is 
answered. Home visiting in which topics beyond religion are 
discussed, teenage athletic programs, and Project Opportunity, 
a program helpful to college admission, are facets of the 
Sodality work. 

The atmosphere of ecumenics has been concretized by the 
Sodality in their discussions with non-Catholic laymen. In the 
area of international concerns, the problems of South America 
and of Africa are of great interest, and efforts are being made 
to assist such South American colleges and universities as those 
of Brazil. 




132 




NURSING SODALITY 




Prefect Gen Foley 

Vice-Prefect Carol Fiorentino 

Senior Rep Peggy Embler 

Junior Rep Marian Mayer 

Sophomore Rep Moreen Owens 

Freshman Rep Pam Wilson 

Moderator Rev. Edward J. Gorman, S.J. 



EDUCATION SODALITY 





Prefect Carol Milan 

Vice-Prefect Marlene Gauthier 

Secretary Ann Abbot 

Treasurer Elizabeth Keaney 

Moderator Rev. William Fitzgerald, S.J. 



133 




UNIVERSITY CHORALE 




President Frank Pados 

Secretary Martin Paul 

Treasurer Frank Sousa 

Senior Manager John Coll 




134 






An organization devoted to the appreciation of good music, 
the University Chorale has grown during the ninety-nine years 
of its existence to the stature of a major coeducational Campus 
organization. For the past five years, the Chorale has presented 
such major works as the Berlioz Requiem, the Carmhia Biirana 
of Carl Orff, the Bach Magnificat in D, and Britten's St. 
Nicholas Cantata. 

The students who participate in the Chorale's activities are 
characterized by their true Boston College spirit. This is clearly 
observed in their enthusiasm and willingness to devote their 
time to preparing programs which are outstanding for their 
cultural, as well as their entertaining value. 

The central figure, directing and encouraging this group of 
students is Dr. C. Alexander Peloquin. In his eleventh year at 
Boston College, Dr. Peloquin could rightly look back at his 
career at the University as one of great renown, and of greater 
promise. 

There is a uniqueness in the University Chorale. There are 
many who are never known as individuals. Yet it is because of 
such as these that the Chorale is so successful. In the spirit of 
unity, they pay tribute to the great masters who are immortal- 
ized in the group's endeavors. The Chorale should thus be 
duly acknowledged for its contribution to the cultural educa- 
tion of the student body, and to the image that Boston College 
projects to the non-academic community. 



135 




BAND 



The Boston College Band consists of many bands, the larg- 
est of which is the famous B.C. Eagles' Marching Band which 
numbers 85 musicians, a drum major, a twenty man color 
guard, and this year's addition, a majorette. 

The Boston College Concert Band, now three years old, 
numbers about 75 musicians, including several young ladies. 

The winter athletics are enthusiastically backed by the B.C. 
Pep Band, a voluntary group ranging from 30-50 members, 
who play at the home and tournament games. 

The youngest member is the Eagles of Sound, a dance band 
which performs at formal and semi-formal affairs throughout 
the year. 

The Director of the Boston College Band is Mr. Peter C. 
Siragusa. All of the members contribute their time and talents 
on a voluntary basis. But without this contribution the col- 
legiate life at Boston College would indeed be lacking a vital 
part. 



President Robert Branca 

Vice-President Jack McCarthy 

Secretary Gail Janson 

Treasurer William McDermott 

Drum Major Dennis Nolan 

Senior Manager Edward Flynn 





136 






137 



R. O. T. C. 



The purpose of the Boston College Reserve Officer Training 
Corp Brigade is to train future officers in the United States 
Army. Because of the nature of the R.O.T.C. organization, the 
Brigade is a unique combination of time-honored tradition 
in both mihtary and academic spheres. If ever the concept 
of the citizen-soldier is realized, it is achieved here, as cadets 
study both military science and their chosen major fields. From 
this process, the Army derives a solid core of intelligent 
leaders and the Boston College student receives practical expe- 
rience in organization skills which cannot be taught in a 
classroom. 

As the Cold War grows hotter, especially in Southeast Asia, 
increasing numbers of Boston College men will be called to 
serve. Major James W. Clark, a member of the R.O.T.C. 
instructor group through first semester, was ordered to Viet 
Nam shortly after Christmas. Some of this year's class of 
lifty-three 2nd lieutenants expect to follow him after gradua- 
tion. No matter where they are ordered, however, Boston 
College R.O.T.C. graduates will serve with the distinction 
befitting both their Alma Mater and the Cadet Brigade. 






138 







Brigade Commander Cadet Lt. Col. Cassaletto 

Deputy Brig. Commander Cadet Major Callen 

Brigade Executive Clicer Cadet Major Geden 

Ass't Brig. Exec. Officer Cadet Capt. Hauser 



139 




Richard Barbieri 
Wendell Bowerman 
Joseph Connors 
Dennis McCarthy 
Ernest Moniz 
Albert Wagner 
Spencer Weig 
Dean of the College 



SCHOLARS OF 
THE COLLEGE 



Rev. John Willis, S.J. 



The University motto "Ever To Excel" finds its academic 
embodiment in the Scholars of the College. To be appointed a 
Scholar of the College is the highest award in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

Near the end of each academic year, several members of the 
Junior Class of the College of A&S who have demonstrated 
the highest level of academic ability, intellectural maturity, and 
scholarly achievement are appointed Scholars of the College. 

These scholars are given the assistance of an adviser under 
whose direction they are aHowed to select their own program 
of studies. The scholars are granted special academic privileges 
in recognition of their intellectual maturity. 

They are allowed to elect courses in some areas without 
fulfilling prerequisites, and attend classes at their own discre- 
tion. In addition the scholars may undertake the task of writing 
an honors thesis, which is presented to the University at grad- 
uation. Members of this group are of the highest caliber both 
in terms of intellectual achievement and service to the school. 




140 



LEWIS DRILL TEAM 




An integral part of the Boston College R.O.T.C. program 
is the Lewis Drill Team. Composed of cadets, they have 
represented the college on several occasions in the official 
capacity of Honor and Color Guards. This organization, 
commanded by Cadet Major Bernard Gattozzi, has also been 
active in the competitive field, evidenced by their participation 
in the annual Pershing Rifles Competition Drill Meet held at 
St. Peter's College, Jersey City, N.J. In the New England area 
the Drill Team has competed at both Northeastern and the 
University of Rhode Island. 



It has always been the aim of Jesuit education to produce 
men who are well-balanced morally, intellectually, and socially. 
In keeping with this ideal, the Order of Cross and Crown was 
established. It is the senior honor society in Arts & Sciences, 
and the first such society to be established at Boston College. 
Membership is restricted to Dean's List students, with a special 
emphasis on extracurricular activities. The society annually 
sponsors the popular Jesus Sanroma piano concert. 



CROSS AND CROWN 




141 



LAY APOSTOLATE 



The sun-kissed shores of Jamaica, the land of the Sultans 
in Baghdad, the mysteries or oriental Japan all sound romantic, 
but work, not romance is the milieu of the lay apostle in these 
areas. This year's 43 volunteers will bring B.C.'s all time total 
to 250. 

In 1957, two grads journeyed to Jamaica to teach at Annotto 
Bay. Each year the number has grown, and the commitments 
have widened. This year thirty-five volunteers will be sent to 
Jamaica, Iraq, Alaska, Japan, and New Mexico. The others 
will spend the summer in Kansas City, Missouri. 

What does a lay apostle do? Lay apostles gain practical 
experience in teaching on the high school and collegiate level. 
For nurses, there is experience as a visiting nurse and in clinic 
work. For those interested in travel, there are opportunities 
to become acquainted with different cultures and people. 






142 



BETA GAMMA SIGMA 




Beta Gamma Sigma, initiated at Boston College in 1957, 
is a national fraternity affording special recognition to those 
of outstanding academic achievement in the College of Business 
Administration. Its members comprise the top four percent 
of the junior class and the top six percent of the senior class. 
While scholastic achievement is the prime basis in determining 
acceptance, candidates must also manifest integrity of character 
and a knowledge and respect for business ethics. 

The fraternity thus produces men who will be a credit to 
the everyday business world and to the name of Boston College. 

President James H. Gaynor 

Vice President William Bond 

Student Secretary-Treasurer Bryan Gaynor 

Faculty Secretary-Treasurer Arthur Glynn 

Moderator Rev. Alfred Jolson, S.J. 




143 



MATER SPEI 



Inspired by the traditions of Jesuit excellence, the Mater 
Spei seeks to recognize outstanding achievement by senior 
graduate nurses. 





The Alpha and Omega Society, the official honor society of 
the School of Education was established in 1955 for the pur- 
pose of selecting scholar-teachers who have shown excellence in 
academic achievement, character and service to the University. 



ALPHA AND OMEGA 



144 



ALPHA SIGMA NU 



"Scholarship, loyalty and service" form the basis for selec- 
tion for the national honor society Alpha Sigma Nu. 





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After application, examination and interviews Senior Nurses 
with high scholastic averages who have shown interest in uni- 
versity activities are chosen as members of the Sienna Society. 



SIENNA SOCIETY 



145 



Celebrating one-hundred years of continually entertaining 
play production, the Dramatic Society under the direction of 
Dr. J. Paul Marcoux and moderated by Fr. Joseph Larkin, S.J. 
has provided Boston College the opportunity of viewing a 
vsLuety of theatrical works ranging from Shakespeare's Othello 
to Robert Bolt's A Man For All Seasons. 

The Student Activities Building is the home of the Dramatic 
Society, providing an opportunity for rehearsals and for build- 
ing sets. 

After the major productions of A Man For All Seasons and 
Antigone the aspiring actors were challenged by Thornton 
Wilder's Love and Hoiv to Cure It, and W. B. Yeats' Land 
of Hearts Desire, two workshop productions. 

Considering the superb quality of the plays of the past 
years, Boston College can look forward to many more success- 
ful productions — productions of a variety of works certain 
to win admiration from all who attend. 

President Arch Russell 

Vice-President Robert Sullivan 

Secretary Paul O'Brien 

Corresponding Secretary Spencer Weig 

Moderator Rev. Joseph Larkin, S.J. 




DRAMATIC SOCIETY 




146 





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GOLD 
KEY 





148 




The Gold Key Society is a fraternal organization dedicated 
to the service and sacrifice of Boston College. In the realm of 
service, the society serves as the official ambassador of good- 
will to notable personages who may visit the campus for various 
reasons. In the spirit of sacrifice, the Society assists in the 
guidance of the children at the Nazareth Home in Jamaica 
Plain, rendering a fatherly hand to the small children. 

Easily recognized by his gold arm band, the Key man is an 
integral part of the University structure, linking student and 
administration. From its inception twenty-five years ago, the 
Key has grown in size and scope with the University. This 
past year saw a record forty-two active members elevated to 
the office of keyholder. To achieve such a distinction juniors 
must compile a record of outstanding service and selfless gene- 
rosity to the University through participation in varied activities 
of the Key, which range from Orientation Week in the fall, to 
the Holy Cross Rally in the winter, to the Citizen Seminars in 
the spring. But, all is not work, for the keyholders and active 
members enjoy a healthy social life. From the freshman-junior 
banquet to a Halloween party to the annual awards dinner, the 
Key man integrates work and pleasure. The highlight of the 
social calendar is the Cotillion in the spring, when keyholders- 
elect are announced. 

Thus, in the spirit of Boston College, the Gold Key Society 
is ever trying to excel. Whether it be dedicated service to Alma 
Mater at seminars, or selfless sacrifice at Nazareth, the men of 
the Gold Key Society engender a spirit of love for Boston 
College. 



President Ralph Mulford 

Vice-President Tom Walsh 

Treasurer Charles Artesani 

Secretary Leon Bien 




149 



Alpha Kappa Psi, a charter member of the Professional 
Interfraternity Conference, is one of the twenty largest national 
college fraternities, and has been a leader in providing maxi- 
mum ser\'ices and benefits for its members. 

During the academic year. Alpha gives its members experi- 
ence in organization, administration, leadership training, public 
relations, and other activities which will be of value to them in 
their future business careers. Professional programs with speak- 
ers from the business world are featured, tours are made 
available, and research projects such as the Survey of Electives 
and the Survey of Majors are undertaken for reviewing and 
revision. 

The initiation period is designed to encourage members to 
obser\'e high ideals and ethics in business. Once initiated, each 
member has the satisfaction of knowing that he has attained 
the standard of scholarship, personality, ability and character 
required by the Fraternity. 

The highlight of the pledge period and the social calendar is 
the initiation Dinner Dance held in December. At this year's 
dance Rev. Robert J. Cheney, S.J., was formally initiated as a 
Faculty brother. Judy Lordan, a junior in the School of Educa- 
tion was chosen the Sweetheart of 1965, and congratulated by 
Pat Hanna, the sweetheart of 1964. An enjoyable evening 
ended to become another cherished memory for the brothers 
of Alpha Kappa Psi. 

President William Pacelli 

Vice-President Richard Cannon 

Treasurer David Mungovan 

Secretary Maurice Giguere 

Master of Rituals James Barry 




vy^PHA 

KAPPA 

PSI 




150 




DELTA SIGMA PI 



President Stephen P. Scibelli, Jr. 

Senior Vice-President David Patenoude 

Junior Vice-President Kevin Carmody 

Secretary Ronald Maclachlan 

Treasurer T. Joseph McKay 

Historian Charles Palmer 

Chancellor John E. Lynch, Jr. 

Moderator Frederick Zappala 




The Boston College chapter of Delta Sigma Pi, the profes- 
sional national business fraternity is in its ninth year of growth. 
Under the direction of President Stephen Scibelli and his 
officers, the fraternity has been demonstrating success in each 
of its programs. 

The central theme of this organization is action, succinctly 
shown through the pledge period, six demanding weeks of 
trial, after which the new brother shares professional and 
social fellowship. 

The Career Conference, sponsored in conjunction with the 
Alumni Association, invites prominent B.C. graduates to relate 
their experiences in the world of business. These lectures are 
complemented by tours of business organizations thereby 
affording the brothers first-hand observation of their chosen 
professions. 

The social aspect of the fraternity is highlighted by the 
Initiation Dinner-Dance which is held in December honoring 
the new brothers. This year the chapter welcomed honorary 
brother, Fr. John St. John, S.J., the spiritual guidance counselor 
in C.B.A. 

One of the most beneficial functions sponsored by Delta is 
the Annual Parents Week-End, in which parents, their sons 
and dates spend Saturday socializing and Sunday attending a 
community Mass and breakfast. Through efforts such as these 
Delta Sigma Pi helps in developing the complete Boston 
College professional man. 




151 



Circle K, the chief sen'ice organization of the College of 
Business Administration, is the collegiate branch of Kiwanis 
International. In the spirit of its worldwide counterpart, the 
organization is characterized by its selfless service. This year, 
in its responsible capacity, the group co-sponsored the C.B.A. 
Freshman Orientation Program. It also conducted both the 
C.B.A. student elections and the United Fund Drive. Its mem- 
bers also ser\'ed as ushers at the annual Sullivan Award 
Banquet — the major academic and social event on the C.B.A. 
calendar. Thus, in fulfilling its goal, the Circle K has proven 
a tremendous assistant in the success of many university 
activities. 



President George C. McMurtry, Jr. 

Vice-President Richard Smith 

Treasurer John T. Griflin, Jr. 

Secretary David O'Connell 

Corresponding Secretary Paul Bonner 



CIRCLE "K" 





COUNCIL FOR 
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 



The goal for which the Council for Exceptional Children 
strives is promoting the welfare of gifted, retarded, and de- 
prived children. Through various sales, funds are collected in 
order to send gifts to culturally deprived school districts. In an 
effort to cultivate stimulating material, guest speakers in various 
specialized fields are invited monthly, and the Council year is 
highlighted by a conference to which educators from the New 
England area attend. Acting as moderator is Dr. Katherine 
Cotter who is extremely helpful in her suggestions and con- 
tinuing interest. 

President Ettore Mortarelli 

Vice-President M. Jane Liddell 

Treasurer Larry Keough 

Secretary Marianne McGinnis 





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KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS 





The Knights of Columbus is a Cathohc fraternal organiza- 
tion open to all Catholic men over 18 years old. The Boston 
College Council was instituted May, 1962 and quickly became 
one of the most active and influential college councils in the 
country. It has received rewards annually for its outstanding 
six-point program. Among the many activities embraced by 
this program are: working with underprivileged orphans, 
teaching CCD programs in a local parish, co-ordination of the 
Boston College Blood Drive, and various social afFairs for its 
brothers. 

This year the B.C. Knights organized an unprecedented Col- 
lege Conference. Over seventy-five delegates from College 
Councils around the country spent a weekend applying their 
energies to the problems shared commonly by all College Coun- 
cils. The general result was a recommendation for a College 
Handbook to be printed exclusively for the specific needs of 
younger members of the Order. 



153 



Founded in 1867, the Fulton Debating Society has ever 
since been instrumental in developing articulate Catholic lead- 
ers and in bringing honor to Boston College. This year has 
been no exception. Consistently during this past season, the 
Fultonians won or placed high in major tournament competi- 
tion. Desire, ability and tradition have once again led the 
Society to a position of national prominence. The debaters 
have compiled impressive records in tournaments at Harvard, 
Chicago, Northwestern, Princeton and Dartmouth, true to the 
Fulton tradition of excellence. 

The success of the Society is a fine tribute to the coaching 
abilities of James Unger, and the moderation of Dr. John 
H. Lawton. 

The Fulton Debating Society is more than a collection of 
names and trophies. During the past few years it has come 
once again to symbolize on a national level the standard of 
intellectual achievement and excellence which Boston College 
highly claims to impart to her student. 



President Albert Wagner 

Vice-President Harry Attridge 

Secretary Robert Hally 

Coach James Unger 

Moderator John H. Lawton, Ph.D. 



FULTON 
DEBATING 

SOCIETY 





154 




COSMOS 



The Cosmos, founded in 1958, serves as the science journal 
for Boston College. While drawing most of its articles from the 
natural sciences, it also makes offering in the fields of math- 
ematics and psychology. 

The aims of this undergraduate journal are simple: to extend 
to the student body knowledge of recent research, and to 
develop an understanding of some of the most recent scientific 
endeavors. 

What the Cosmos demonstrates to the men of science in 
fellow Universities is the fact that BC men and women are 
researching and developing original thoughts in scientific 
pursuits. 

Editor Ernest J. Moniz 

Layout Editor Donald L. Kramer 

Faculty Moderator Andre J. deBethune Ph. D. 




POLITICAL 
CLUBS 

The three political clubs on campus represent both major 
political parties, plus the conservative element so evident in 
present-day thought. The Young Democrats, Young Republi- 
cans, and the Young Americans for Freedom all boast large 
memberships and loyal support; all three are active in flooding 
the campus with political pamphlets and booklets. 

The largest political organization on Campus is the Young 
Democrats. This past year they have proved to be extremely 
active in the field of government affairs, presenting such 
speakers as Robert Bidwell, a B.C. graduate seeking the 
governorship of the Commonwealth. The Dems, looking for- 
ward to growth in size, continue to attract membership during 
the year. 

The Young Republicans in the past year were reformed and 
reorganized by its president Tom Keller, and his able staff. 
They have taken an actively influential role in campus politics 
this year, co-sponsoring the pro-Vietnam policy rally, and 
holding voter registration drives for precinct voters. 

The B.C. chapter of the YAF is one of the largest active 
conservative organizations in New England. A bi-partisan 
student group dedicated to the principle of private enterprise, 
limited government, and individual responsibility, it has been 
over the years engaged in political campaigns, supporting 
candidates dedicated to Constitutional government and a 
strong American foreign policy. This year the YAF filled 
Bapst auditorium by presenting a debate on the U.S. position 
in Viet Nam, and drew large audiences for several of its 
conservative speakers. 






156 




Y.R. 

Pres Thomas Keller 

Vice-Pres Stan Bowker 

Sec Robert Larson 

Treas William Henry 

Exec. Off Larry Straw 

YD. 

Pres James Geary 

Exec. Vice-Pres John A. Businger 

Vice-Pres Thomas Dwyer 

Corr. Sec Robert McNulty 

Treas David T. Gary 

Exec. Bd. member Vincent Murry 

Y.A.F. 

Chm Larry Straw 

Co-Chm John Agresto 

Vice-Chm Charles Lynch 

Sec Margery Morgan 

Treas Richard Roth 

Exec. Off Leonard Sienko 




157 



WVBC 



From its studios located on the top floor of Fulton Hall, 
WVBC broadcasts programs for the dormitory residents. 

Since its inception in 1959, the station has operated with a 
two-fold purpose: to provide programs of special interest for 
the resident students, and to provide its members with experi- 
ence in all phases of radio broadcasting. Its first aim can be 
said to be accomplished by the varied programming of popular, 
folk, jazz and classical music as well as the live broadcasts of 
hockey and basketball games. The second aim is achieved by 
presenting to the station's members opportunities to learn, by 
actual experience, all aspects of radio broadcasting. 

By recently joining the University Broadcasting System 
WVBC has been able to provide a direct link between Boston 
College and the six leading universities of the Boston area. 

All would have to agree that WVBC is truly "The Voice of 
Boston College." 

Promotion Director James Smith 

Chief Engineer Michael F. X. Gigliotti 

Station Manager William R. Metzler 

Program Director William O. Wheatley Jr. 

Moderator Rev. Daniel J. Saunders, S.J. 





158 




Editors-in-Chief Ann O'Malley 

Frank Manning 

Business Manager Robert Hinson 

Managing Editor Daniel Driscoll Jr. 

Moderator Rev. Robert J. Cheney S.J. 



THE HEIGHTS 



The Heights reached to new heights in 1965-66, its 46th 
year of publication. From the retreat debate to the St. John's 
faculty strike, from the system of class cuts to the changes 
in the Theology and Philosophy Departments, the staff gave 
news and editorial coverage to every major issue affecting the 
academic community. It was an eventful year at Boston College, 
and The Heights served its function well by providing stimu- 
lating copy for its more than 7,000 readers. 

Co-Editors-in-Chief Frank Manning and Ann O'Malley, 
who assumed control of the paper at the beginning of the 
spring semester in 1965, directed a staff of 100 students from 
the four undergraduate day schools on campus. Managing 
Editor Dan Driscoll took complete charge of handling the 
type setting and layout specifications. Editors from the news, 
features, and sports departments spent long Tuesday nights, 
and oftentimes long Wednesdays and Thursdays, to complete 
their immense task of publishing more total pages and more 
exclusive stories than The Heights had ever done before. 

As the year ended for the senior editors in January, they 
felt a justifiable pride in what they have accomplished. Their 
policy on retreats, academic freedom, religious education, and 
the student disciplinary practices had been read and discussed 
throughout the campus community. And, as evidence of The 
Heights' influence, much of the changes they urged had 
actually come to pass. 





159 






160 






161 



The undergraduate publications of B.C. exist for the purpose 
of allowing interested students to assume positions of respon- 
sibility in the area of creation for publication. The three 
journals represented here have managed to cover much terri- 
tory and produce some work of excellent quality. 

The Journal of Business included in this year's issue an 
interesting account of the whereabouts of the members of the 
Class of 1965. The Graduate Schools and Law Schools attend- 
ed were cited, along with the average starting salaries of those 
who immediately entered the business field. 

The Stylus, by far the oldest and most venerable publication 
on Campus, once again proved that age is no hindrance to 
freshness and originality. Co-editors Wendell Bowerman arid 
Robert Lallamant were frequent contributors in both prose and 
poetry. However, the Stylus is far from a two man effort. All 
editors and contributors were responsible for quality writing 
and distinctive illustration. 

The Humanities Magazine is devoted to essays of research 
and criticism in the liberal arts. For twenty-five years, the 
Humanities Magazine has been dedicated to presenting the 
best of the scholarly writing undertaken by students in all 
schools of the University. It is the sincere belief of the editors 
that such essays are the best representation of the under- 
graduate progress in the liberal arts, and the clearest indication 
of his competence. For such essays are the fruits of courses 
offered in the arts, and therefore, a tribute to the professors 
teaching them. 



STYLUS 



Co-Editors Wendell Bowerman 

Robert Lallamant 

Senior Editors Richard Leskosky 

Phillippe Thibodeau 

Moderator Rev. Francis Sweeney, S.J. 





162 




HUMANITIES 



Co-Editors Robert Sullivan 

Thomas Cannon 



JOURNAL OF 
BUSINESS 

Editor-in-Chief Edward Lawson, Jr. 

Associate Editors Chris Bearing 

Thomas Warren 
Richard F. Landrigan 

Managing Editors Brian Hallahan 

James Monahan 

Art Editor Francis Mooney 

Editorial Assistant Doris Kastorf 

Moderator Prof. Jos. Devine 




163 





SUB TURRI 



164 






165 




■SJfeat 









167 



SPORTS 




Emphasis on the Heights during 
1965-66 has centered mostly upon 
the academic. But, many will not 
forget that the Towers also look 
down upon a vast and growing 
sports complex. It is right that as a 
university grows, it should grow as 
a whole, and the athletic program 
at Boston College has developed 
with the other phases of university 
life. 

The outstanding physical change 
on the lower campus is the new 
track inside Alumni Stadium, com- 
pleted late in the Spring of 1965. 
The first full season use will feature 
five major meets on the new facility. 

Athletic growth is probably most 
noticeable in the basketball program. 
This year's squad was the strongest 
in the University's history. It was 
ranked as one of the top twenty 
teams in the nation, and the 96-90 
win over Louisville in the N.I.T. 
showed that they could win the big 
one. 

The hockey season was marred 
by devastating injuries, with the 
result that a great team had only an 
average season. As for the football 
team, they continued their winning 
ways thus assuring this year's seniors 
of four winning seasons in the sport. 




169 



FOOTBALL 




Brendan McCarthy 
All-Sophomore 



170 



BUFFALO 






• 


DOWN •• 


YARDS TO SO 






QUARTER 
4 


BOSTON COLLEGE 18 
BUFFALO 6 


HH 









On September 18, 21,000 fans jammed Alumni Stadium to 
see a promising Eagles team and the highly touted Brendan 
McCarthy. After taking the kickoff, Eddie Foley moved the 
Eagles to the Buffalo 13, showing a balanced offense on the 
ground and in the air. Donovan crashed over from the one, 
following an interference call on the Buffalo 11. Marty Di- 
Mezza made the conversion, and B.C. led 7-0. After kicking-off 
the defense stiffened, and Jim Chevilott recovered a fumble on 
the Buffalo 23. Turning on his speed, Dick DeLeonardis skirted 
left end for the second Eagle score. Foley added two more, and 
the score at half-time read: B.C. 13 — Buffalo 0. Buffalo's only 
score came as a result of a blocked DeVito punt. John Leone 
picked off a pass and rambled to the Buffalo 17, to set up the 
final score of the day. Buffalo stiffened, and Marty DiMezza 
was called on to boot a 27 yard field goal to make the score, 
Boston 18 and Buffalo 6. 




"For Boston, for Boston 



'fT? 





Brendan driving 



Eddie back to pass 



171 



VILLANOVA 






DOWN 


• • 


YARDS TO 60 




QUARTER 




BOSTON C0LLE6E 25 




A 




VILLANOVA 





Bursting on to the scene in a blaze of glory was the bruising 
sophomore, Brendan McCarthy. The hard-running fullback 
carried the ball 34 times for 168 yards and a new record for 
the Maroon and Gold. The team also gained 26 first downs to 
add to this record breaking day. 

Bill Ladwig had to be carried off the field with a broken leg, 
but not before he had made several stops and recovered a 
Villanova fumble. 

This was also the last game of the season for Paul Delia 
Villa, who was hurt in practice in preparation for the Army 
game. Paul had a good game picking up 55 yards on the 
ground, and two touchdowns. He was also on the receiving end 
of a forty yard pass from Eddie Foley. 

Eddie Foley had a perfect day going five for five in the air 
for seventy five yards and a touchdown. 

After the dust had settled, it was seen to be an impressive 
28-0 win over Villanova, and the chant went up "Beat Army" 



Paul Delia Villa going away , 




ARMY 




Game three saw the Eagles looking to end a 5 game losing 
streak to Army. Evenly matched on defense, B.C. held the edge 
on offense. The game was to be a defensive battle with 19 
punts. Most of the first half was played in B.C. territory with 
the Eagles crossing the 50 only once in the entire game. Excite- 
ment rose when Boston made a 4th and 1 gamble on their own 
44. After a scoreless first-half, DeVito and Ruriko continued 
their punting duel. Then B.C. lost a fumble on their 22. The 
defense toughened and Army had to settle for a 3-0 lead. 
Pesapane ended an early fourth quarter threat with a fumble 
recovery on the B.C. 7. Tragedy struck again when a short 
DeVito punt only went to the B.C. 30. Seven plays later, Cook 
to Champi made it 10-0. Foley tried desperately to pass B.C. 
back into the game. A fumbled punt on the Army 30 was 
covered by the Cadets ending B.C.'s last chance to score. 




173 



PENN STATE 







DOWN 


00 


YARDS TO GO 






QUARTER 




BOSTON COLLEGE 
PENN STATE 




17 



Many times the final score of a football game is not very 
indicative of the real intensity of a contest. This was precisely 
the case in the 17-0 shutout of the Eagles by the Nittany Lions 
in the home game of the year. 

At the half time break the score stood Penn State 3-0 on a 
33 yard field goal at 9:19 of the initial period. In total offense 
B.C. actually held the edge 112-96 and the Maroon and Gold 
were very much in the ball game. 

After three quarters of action the point spread was still 3-0. 
Then the contest was decided in the first ten minutes of the 
final stanza. From his own ten yard line Joe DiVito punted 
one off the side of his foot that hit a Penn State man on the 
head and before it could be touched rolled out of bounds at 
the B.C. 21. From here the Lions drove in to make the score 
10-0. 

On the ensuing kickoff Dick DeLeonardis lost a fumbled 
ball to Penn whereupon they rolled into the Eagles end zone 
to ice the game 17-0 at 10:12 of the fourth period. 




Bobbie playing with fire in her debut 




174 




Ed bombs, Brendan blocks 



Brendan crunched after getting five 




175 



RICHMOND 




• DOWN •• 


5^ y ^<: 

YARDS TO GO 


" 




QUARTER 


BOSTON COLLEGE 


3S 




4 


RICHMOND 


7 






Charlie picks off another one. 




On a sunny, mild, autumn day the Eagles took on Richmond 
with ail the color and ceremony of Homecoming. Looking for 
a scoring punch, Coach Miller started John Blair at QB. The 
Junior put on a one man show in his first starting role. It took 
the help of McCarthy who ignited the slow starting Eagles, 
and Budzinski who played a great all-around game. Of course 
the defense was tops as usual, giving only 4 first downs and 
93 total yards. Late in the first period, after Richmond had 
scored on. an interception, McCarthy entered the game. After 
he carried 11 of 18 plays moving B.C. 85 yards, Budzinski 
scored. Then Blair broke loose and with great broken field 
running went 51 yards for a T.D. Half-time score was 12-7. 
Receiving the kickoff, B.C. went 75 yards with Blair faking 
to McCarthy and walking in from the two. He hit Budzinski 
for a 48 yard T.D. and made it 25-7. In the final quarter, 
Marzetti intercepted a pass and zig-zagged for a TD that 
was nullified on a clip. Blair then hit Budzinski for the 18 
and made it 32-7. Franco recovered a Richmond fumble on the 
B.C. 28, and Al Giardi guided the team in for the final score. 
He passed 20 yards to Persin, making it 38-7. The offense 
had come to life and B.C. had its Homecoming and third 
win of the year. 



Let me at him. 




Good game, coach! 



176 



V. M. I. 







DOWN 


00 


YARDS TO GO 






QUARTER 
4 




BOSTON COLLEGE 
VM! 


41 
12 




Mr. Budzinski makes it look easy. 





John Blair, qb, receiving instructions from 'upstairs'. 

The statistics at game's end read: first downs 17-17, yards 
gained passing 210-216, and total offense 416-373. The score- 
board, however, offered the score of 41-12. 

Installed as 14 point choices the Eagles found themselves 
behind 7-0 at 10:47 of the first period! Then came an un- 
believable skein of Kadet fumbles, six on six successive plays 
that they handled the pigskin. Sandwiched between these 
bobbles was a two yard plunge by Terry Erwin, which he 
matched at 5 :44 of the final stanza, for six points. 

After Erwin's tally the next 46 minutes brought an Eagle 
dominated display of football that was marked by its team 
balance: McCarthy blasted for a one yard TD and DiMezza 
converted at 6:22 of the second quarter and they duplicated 
exactly this scoring pattern at 6:22 of the third period. Then 
John Blair hit Dick DeLeonardis on a 39 yard scoring play 
with DiMezza again converting late in the first half. 

With the subs in at the start of the final quarter V.M.I. 
managed a 66 yard bomb and a P.A.T. which combined with 
Erwin's finishing tally to establish a decisive Maroon and Gold 



Another first down for the Eagles. 



MIAMI 






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Offensive line gets into the picture. 




Defense makes itself felt. 



For the second straight year the Eagles journeyed South to 
the Miami Orange Bowl only to play a brand of football that 
did not do themselves justice. 

The Eagles definitely were not blown off the field by the 
Hurricanes, they kind of walked off under their own power. 
The 27-6 final was most indicative of the general tone of the 
entire encounter. 

John Blair started at quarterback, but was replaced by Ed 
Foley after an intercepted pass before which he had completed 
three straight. Foley was also unable to get the Eagles rolling 
and they did not go past the Miami 30 yard marker until the 
fourth period. 

The lone B.C. marker came with Foley at the helm. After 
a pass interference penalty on Miami, Foley connected with 
Captain Charlie Smith on a 26 yard scoring play early in the 
fourth period. 

The two most exciting events of the evening were a record 
breaking 53 yard field goal in the middle of a rain shower by 
Curtwright and a 50 yard punt return by a pure-blooded 
Indian, Andy Sixkiller. 




"Smitty" snares one for a first down. 



178 



Mr. Seragusa in action. 



WILLIAM & MARY 




• 


DOWN 


• • 


YARDS TO &0 







QUARTER 




BOSTON COLLEGE 


30 




4 




WILLIAM S MARY 


17 





For many people Saturday, November 13 was the day for 
the Grad Record Exams or the Law Boards. However, for the 
17,527 fans that sat in a steady drizzle to watch the William 
and Mary — B.C. contest it was the day for Eddie Foley. 

For Ed it was his greatest day in a Maroon and Gold 
uniform. In 15 attempts Eddie completed 10 aerials, good for 
the fantastic total of 300 yards and three TD's. This sum 
combined with his 17 rushing yards gained for him two 
Boston College records: most yards gained passing in one 
game, beating Butch Songin's 299 in 1948; and total offense, 
17 ahead of Jack Concannon's 300 in 1963. 

On the first play of the game Foley hit Bob Budzinski 
behind the right safety and Bob went to the Wm. and Mary's 
16 before being stopped. On the 71 completion and the Eagles 
were off and running with Terry Erwin initiating the B.C. 
scoring on a one yard plunge at 2 : 59 of the first stanza. 

The Eagles ran up a 30-0 lead on scores by Erwin, Joe Pryor, 
and two by Dick Deleonardis before Wm. and Mary tallied 
on the reserves. 




"Yes, I will. No, you won't." 



Which way is the ball going.' 



179 



SYRACUSE 






'''mmiStbmiik 





The odds makers had installed the Orangemen from Syra- 
cuse as a 17 point choice over the visiting Eagles from B.C. 
What these "pros" had not considered was what every Maroon 
and Gold fan knew; the Eagles had a better ball club than 
they were being credited with, and they had never failed to be 
especially ready for the Saltine Warriors. 

As it turned out it was the B.C. partisanship that had called 
the game. The Eagles won the toss and elected to receive. Joe 
DiVito punted after B.C. was unable to move. When Syracuse 
could not penetrate B.C.'s defense they attempted a boot that 
was blocked by Nick Franco and recovered by Ed Lipson. 
From the Orangemen's 20 McCarthy hit for 5, Foley for 10, 
McCarthy for 2, and Ed for the TD. Marty DiMezza converted 
to make the score 7-0. 

After Floyd Little flashed a punt return 62 yards to tie 
the game, Dave Pesapaine made another break for the Eagles. 
He hit Larry Csonka causing a fumble that Ron Gentili picked 
off in mid-air and scooted 25 yards to pay dirt. 

The score stayed this way till 14:22 of the third period 
when Csonka finished off Syracuse's only extended drive of 
the afternoon with a 2 yard plunge. Now with the score at 
14-13 B.C. remained very much in the contest even after Little 
slashed 45 yards with a screen pass to mark the score 21-13 
with 2:30 left in the game. But on seven passes B.C. could 
only move from their own 14 to the Syracuse 47 before they 
were forced to give up possession. 

In the end it was another bitter defeat, but the Eagles had 
played their finest game of the season, by far. 





HOLY CROSS 










The day of the 1965 annual B.C.-Holy Cross encounter was 
the day that the rains came down. It was also the day that the 
B.C. A. A. asked that the game be rescheduled to the following 
afternoon. However, neither element was successful in stopping 
the imminent disaster that the Eagles had in store for the 
Crusaders. 

Late in the first quarter the H.C. punter fumbled the snap 
from center which was recovered by Bill Stetz on the Crusaders 
9. In three plays Deleonardis, McCarthy, and Erwin combined 
for the tally at the 38 second mark of the second period. 

At the half the score was 14-0 on the basis of an Ed Foley 9 
yard roll out around the left end, and a Foley to Charlie 
Smith conversion. 

Terry Erwin registered two more TD's and Brendan Mc- 
Carthy smacked for one six-pointer as the Eagles practically 
named their score. On the final three Eagle markers Marty 
DiMezza converted like clock work. 

It was a scoreless final stanza as Coach Jim Miller mercifully 
gave all his players a chance to get some game action under 
their belts. 

The highlight of this dull afternoon, weather wise that is, 
was the superb play of Soph fullback Brendan McCarthy, 
although that of Ed Foley was worthy of much comment also. 
Brendan carried the pigskin 20 times amassing 139 yards and 
one TD to go along with his 6.9 average gain. 

The sports writers thought enough of Brendan's display, 
which was capped by a 57 yard jaunt to the H.C. four early 
in the third period, to vote him the O'Melia Award given each 
year to the outstanding player in the Boston College-Holy 
Cross football game. 

And so it ended, a football season of mixed emotions. One 
marked by its initial optimism and its later disappointments 
along with its final moments of glory. 



183 



HOCKEY 




John Cunniff 
All-American 



184 



"Everything's Coming Up Roses" was the song that the B.C. 
hockey fans were humming as they thought of the upcoming 
1965-66 season. From the 1964-65 edition of the Eagles but 
four lettermen had been lost and this was the group that had 
amassed a 24-7 slate, Beanpot and E.C.A.C. Championships 
and a runner-up spot in the N.C.A.A. Tourney. Awaiting the 
26 game schedule that began the first week in December with 
R.P.I, was the fantastic first wave composed of John Cunniff, 
Phil Dyer and Jim Mullen which, as a group, had led the 
country in scoring in '64-'65. From the Frosh were coming 
much sought-after Paul "The Shot" Hurley, Steve Dowling, 
Whitey Allen and Goalie Jeff Cohen. 

Off their 9-0 trouncing of R.P.I, it looked like a repeat of 
the previous season's winning ways and a correct pre-season 
first place ranking in the East. John Cunniff accounted for a 
pair of goals and two assists to lead the scorers and Jeff Cohen 
racked up a shutout in his very first varsity assignment. 

At Ithaca, N.Y. versus a Cornell squad with 16 lettermen, 
was ranked pre-season third in the East, the Maroon and Gold 
were edged 3-1, but no one was hitting the panic button. 
However, at :30 of the first period at McHugh versus a 
tough Brown sextet the B.C. hockey picture for the '65-'66 
campaign suddenly changed. On his first rush down his 
left wing, John Cunniff was sandwiched between Dennis 
"Diesel" Macks and the Bruins' left defensemen, crashing 
heavily into the boards behind the Brown nets. Grimacing, 
John skated back to the B.C. bench shaking his head dis- 
gustingly, helmet in hand. To the press row the word was 
flashed — "separated shoulder; possibly out for the season." 




Cunniff nets another 




Gordie Clarke rushes with Paul Hurley trailing 



185 




mmmmmmmmim 




Dartmouth drive smothered by "Murph" 




York in patented swing around the Army defense 




Woody from Mullen and Cunniff 



Despite continuing on for a 3-0 win over the Bruins the 
Eagles were "down" for their encounter with the Terriers of 
B.U. at the Arena and were clobbered 9-2. Princeton at 
McHugh registered as a 6-2 win. At the Boston Garden in 
the Christmas Festival, Dartmouth bit the dust 10-1. In the 
E.C.A.C. Holiday Tourney in New York, the Eagles were 
beaten in a real tight contest 5-3 with the decisive score 
coming with only 30 seconds remaining in the game. Pat 
Murphy faced the flying rubber initially in this contest in the 
third period in which the Redmen were shut-out except for an 
open net tally at game's end. 

The three Canadian schools made their annual excursions 
to McHugh during the Christmas break and were handled 
well by the Eagle six. Brian Hughes of McGill was the most 
colorful backstop seen in McHugh this season. With leaps, 
dives, circus catches and flamboyant tosses he endeared him- 
self to the B.C. fans. The University of Montreal provided 
not only a tense 3-2 overtime victory, but also was the cause of 
a most unique incident between their coach. Dr. Dion, and 
Referee Bill Cleary. As Cleary skated by the Montreal bench 
after assessing the Carabins with a delay-of-game penalty, Dion 
lashed out with a left hook that found its way to deary's jaw 
and precipitated his ejection to the dressing room and a ten- 
minute misconduct and a five-minute major team penalty. 
10-1 was the margin of victory over a previously undefeated 
Loyola unit. 

Upstate New York was unhospitable for the Maroon and 
Gold icemen as they dropped 5-0 and 9-3 games on successive 
evenings to Clarkson and St. Lawrence. 

At the Arena, Northeastern scraped by an injury-riddled 
Eagle six 3-2. On the shelf were Phil Dyer, Woody Johnson, 
John Moylan and Tom Lufkin, besides John Cunniff with a 
variety of ailments. 

Contributing to the tying of the B.C. record for most suc- 
cessive losses (5) were Harvard, 4-7 and Brown 1-3. This 
streak was broken when the Eagles slipped by a vastly under- 
rated Colgate team 5-4. The following night this Colgate 
squad gave B.U. its first Eastern loss of the season. 




Jim Mullen down the right wing 




Ferriera and Ross stop York and Clarke in the Garden's 
Beanpot action 



187 



Providence fell 5-4 in a vicious game that saw blood drawn 
more than once and a post game mashing of sticks. In the 
Beanpot consolation, the B.C. six were winners 5-3. 

With the E.C.A.C. playoffs resting on each game the 
Eagles smashed Army 6-2 and, on Washington's Birthday, 
presented John "Snooks" Kelley with his 400th win. Coinci- 
dentally this landmark occurred against the only collegiate 
hockey coach who has 300 victories, Eddie Jerimiah, and 
against the same team that was the 300th victim of "Snooks". 

In their final appearance of the 1965-66 schedule in Mc- 
Hugh, the Eagles were again paired with their Comm. Ave. 
neighbors, B.U. At no time in the game was either team 
ahead by more than a single goal and at the end of of sixty 
minutes of play it was all even 4-4. Neither team had much 
of a scoring opportunity in the first two minutes, but at 2:10, 
Pat Murphy made a sensational stop of two shots in succession 
from less than 15 feet before Jim Quinn lifted one over the 
helpless and unprotected Murphy at 2:16 of the overtime 
period. 

The contest with the Red Raiders from Colgate was signif- 
icant also in that it marked the return of John Cunniff and 
the rest of the injured Eagles to the starting lineup. On their 
return, B.C. fans felt, rested the Beanpot and whatever else 
could be salvaged from the remaining schedule. In this, his 
first game of his "second season", John tallied his fourth 
lamplighter of his abbreviated campaign. 

In Beanpot warmups, B.C. rolled over Yale 8-0 and topped 
N.U. at McHugh 5-3. It was now the first week in February: 
Beanpot time at the Garden. In the opening game of the eve- 
ning, Harvard upset N.U. and prepared the crowd for the key 
encounter of the night, B.C. vs. B.U. Midway through the 
second stanza the Eagles had moved in front 3-0 on goals by 
John Cunniff, Jerry York, and Dick Fuller and were flying 
high, as were their fans. By the 20:00 mark of this same 
period the scoreboard read 3-3 and all the beans rested on 
the outcome of the final twenty minutes. Scoring first in this 
period, the Terriers took the play away from the Eagles and 
iced the game and the 'Pot 6-4 with John Moylan netting the 
other B.C. score late in the third period. 





Whitey slips one in 




188 





Not quite by Clarke and Kupka 



y. 



Fuller on the face oflf 




Moylan digging — Dartmouth diving 



189 




John from 20 feet 




The third hne foiled in 400th win for "Snooks' 



190 



At Providence it was the Eagles on top 14-5 and at Colby 
the Eagles were winners 10-4 to pave the way to the first 
round of the E.C.A.C. In these two contests two B.C. records 
were matched. John Cunniff tied the all time career scoring 
mark of Billy Daley, 153 points (52 - 67 - 34) and against 
Providence Jerry York became the third man in B.C. history 
to tally five goals in a game. 

Their second trip of the season to Ithaca was no more 
successful than the first as the Redmen from Cornell skated 
the Eagles off the ice in the opening round of the E.C.A.C. 9-0. 

And so it ended; a season by Boston College standards less 
than successful, but by any other criteria very respectable. 




Phil and Jim in front with John on the wing 





York tallies against B.U. in Beanpot, assisted by "Kup" and Whitey 




Cunniff from Dyer in season's finale at McHugh 




B.C. Sport Fans' presentation to Pat and the other seniors Woody closes in to cover for Murph 

pre-B.U. 



191 




Disputed decision • on Whitey's blast that was disallowed as Clarke awaits rebound 






The windup and the pitch 



192 





Post game chatter by Snooks as Mullen, Cornish, and Dowling look on 





B.C. penalty upcoming versus B.U. in the Arena Dyer's backhand smothered 



193 




Close, but no cigar for Clarke from Allen 





York clears as Dowling and Hurley effectively check the wings 



Snooks at home 



194 




1965-1966 VARSITY HOCKEY TEAM 

Front Row, Left to Right: Mgr. Chuck Hibbett, Jim Mullen, Pat 
Dyer, John Cunniff, Capt. Allan Keirstead, John Moylan, Bob 
Cornish, Tom Lufkin, Mgr. Walt Kirby. 
Second Row, Left to Right: Coach "Snooks" Kelley, Dick Fuller, 



Bob Kupka, JefF Cohen, Pat Murphy, Ken Allan, Fred Kinsman, 

Jerry York, Equip. Mgr. Jack Tighe. 

Third Row, Left to Right: Art Byrne, Jim Green, Gordie Clarke, 

Joe Valle, Paul Hurley, Steve Dowling, Dave Allen, Woody 

Johnson. 



BOSTON 


COLLEGE HOCKEY — 


FINAL 




Won 


17, Lost 10 




B.C. 


9 


R.P.L 





B.C. 


1 


Cornell 


3 


B.C. 


3 


Brown 





B.C. 


2 


B.U. 


9 


B.C. 


6 


Princeton 


2 


B.C. 


10 


Dartmouth 


1 


B.C. 


3 


St. Lawrence 


5 


B.C. 


5 


McGiU 


1 


B.C. 


3 


Montreal 


2(OT) 


B.C. 


10 


Loyola 


2 


B.C. 


2 


Northeastern 


3 


B.C. 





Clarkson 


5 


B.C. 


3 


St. Lawrence 


9 


B.C. 


4 


Harvard 


7 


B.C. 


1 


Brown 


3 


B.C. 


5 


Colgate 


4 


B.C. 


8 


Yale 





B.C. 


5 


Northeastern 


3 


B.C. 


4 


B.U. 


6 * 


B.C. 


5 


Providence 


4 


B.C. 


5 


Northeastern 


3 * 


B.C. 


6 


Army 


2 


B.C. 


6 


Dartmouth 


2 


B.C. 


4 


B.U. 


5 (OT) 


B.C. 


14 


Providence 


5 


B.C. 


10 


Colby 


4 


B.C. 





Cornell 


C) ** 







Individual Scoring 






NAME 


GAMES 


GOALS ASSISTS 


POINTS 


Jerry York 


26 




21 


16 


37 


Paul Hurley 


26 




9 


26 


35 


John Cunniff 


14 




13 


21 


34 


Jim Mullen 


26 




21 


13 


34 


Phil Dyer 


21 




11 


18 


29 


Whitey Allen 


25 




8 


19 


27 


Gordie Clark 


26 




15 


9 


24 


Woody Johnson 


26 




4 


15 


19 


John Moylan 


21 




5 


13 


18 


Bob Kupka 


26 




11 


5 


16 


Dick Fuller 


26 




5 


7 


12 


Steve Dowling 


26 




3 


9 


12 


Allan Keirstead 


26 




1 


4 


5 


Jim Greene 


14 




2 


2 


4 


Art Byrne 


14 




1 


2 


3 


Fred Kinsman 


8 




1 


2 


3 


Ty Anderson 


5 







1 


1 


Bob Cornish 


5 







1 


1 


TOTALS 






131 


183 


314 




Goalie Records 






GAMES PERIODS GOALS 


SAVES 


AVG. 


Pat Murphy 20 




48 


62 


481 


3.10 


Jeff Cohen 16 




32 


35 


277 


2.18 


Ken Allan 1 




1 


1 


3 


1.00 



*Beanpot Tournament 
**E.C.A.C. Playoffs 



195 



BASKETBALL 




John Austin 
Ail-American 



196 



As the 1965-66 basketball season got underway optimism 
in all quarters was rampant. All the preseason polls had rated 
the Eagles among the top twenty in the country and with the 
loss of but three members from the '64-'65 club, leaving a 
nucleus of Captain Ed Hockenbury, John Austin, Willie 
Wolters and Doug Hice, these estimations seemed well found- 
ed. Considering the newcomers, Steve Adelman, Jim Kissane, 
Jack Kvancz, and Steve Kelliher from last year's 20-0 Frosh 
outfit, nothing but the best seemed to lay in store for the 
Maroon and Gold. 

The initial encounter of the campaign produced a 107-84 
breeze over Dartmouth with Junior letterman Ted Carter on 
the sidelines with a broken finger. The home opener was a 
stunning upset loss to a highly underrated Fairfield quintet 
100-93. Fouls were a factor, but the Eagles just didn't have 
it that night. 




John from the circle hits another. 



197 



The pendulum swung the other way at Storrs, Conn, as the 
B.C. squad blasted U.Conn. off the court with a late surge for 
a 90-74 win. St. Mary's from the West Coast showed little in 
their losing effort. 

At South Bend, the Fighting Irish came up with their best 
try of the season but it was not enough as the Eagles triumphed 
93-89. In Roberts' Center, a highly regarded team from 
Georgetown played the Maroon and Gold evenly most of the 
game, but were not quite good enough as Willie Wolters 
stuffed in the game winner with one second remaining. 

At the E.C.A.C. Holiday Festival in Madison Square Garden, 
"Cooz" and Company went to the finals beating Colorado 
State 86-64 and Army 92-85. Versus the Friars of Providence, 
Jimmy Walker with 50 points proved too much as the Eagles 
fell short of the championship 91-86. 





'Cooz" and Company. 



Austin headed for two of 30 versus Seton Hall. 





Adelman and Kelleher team up for a rebound. 



Steve crashes for the hoop. 



198 




Rossi and Kissane fight Fairfield for the bail. 




Off the pick by Adelman and Kelleher goes John. 



199 




I thought they weren't supposed to start without the captain. 





Mr. Outside and Mr. Inside Combine. 



200 




Able to leap tall buildings at a single bound. 





Willie overpowers the Cross for two. 



B.C.'s ever-smiling Director of Sports Information 
Eddie Miller courtside in New York. 



201 




Doug Hice is too quick for St. Mary's 




John gets some words from the master. 




One on three and John tallys. 





Another bound to Willie's all time Eagle rebound record. 



Bill Dwyer gets baseline and scores. 




Basket good — one shot to U. Mass. 




No rebound on this one. 




Willie and Steve Kelleher converge for this hoop. 




204 



All's fair in love and war. 




At home Rhode Island ran with the Eagles, but not as well, 
and dropped a 99-91 decision. Coinciding with the first major 
snowstorm of the winter was N.Y.U.'s appearance in Roberts. 
Holding a 62-38 advantage on the boards proved decisive for 
B.C. as they grabbed the win 88-75. 

Northeastern proved a tough nut to crack as they forced 
the Eagles' game at Cabot Gym all the way before falling 
70-63. Then came the most exciting of all the regular season 
contests. Providence at Providence. For those Eagle fans that 
could not make the trip, the E.C.A.C. Game of the Week fed 
it back to Boston via the T.V. circuit. In a final three minutes 
that few people will ever forget with the score tied 77-77, the 
Friars froze the ball for 2:30 before calling for a time out. 

Jim Walker threw the ball in bounds and received a return 
pass with 20 seconds left. At the 10 second mark with defen- 
sive ace Doug Hice on him like a glove he made his move 
for the basket. As he went up for the shot a personal was 
whistled on Doug. Walker hit on both shots and the game 
went into the record books 79-77 for Providence. 

Colby provided little competition losing 95-79. In the home 
game of the year, St. Joseph's ranked sixth in the nation, cut 
down the Eagles 107-89. 

After the B.C. Frosh had beaten a previously undefeated 
H.C. Frosh five, the varsity followed suit over the H.C upper- 
classmen 98-68. U. Mass. fell easily 100-80. Four successive 
away games did not faze the poised Eagles as they beat 



WVBC scoops with an interview with "Red" Auerbach. 




"Buzz" Chaney pops from way down town for a couple. 



205 



Fordham 96-86, B.U. 73-62, Navy 94-78 and Tufts 94-66. 

The home finale against Seton Hall was John Austin night 
and the script was nearly perfect. The Maroon and Gold ran 
wild 112-77 and John tallied 30 markers. However, half way 
through the final period John came down hard on his right 
foot and had to leave the game. What was initially regarded 
as minor turned out to be a major break and John had played 
his last game in a B.C. uniform. 

Wins over Northeastern and Holy Cross finished out the 
regular season which was capped by an N.I.T. bid. 

Records were numerous during this '65-'66 season. John 
Austin now held every Boston College scoring record. Willie 
Wolters had the school rebound record with another season 
remaining. Ed Hockenbury set a B.C. assist mark for both a 
career and a single game. And that's the way it happened — 
moving to the top. 





Sf^^ 


BO^IK: ^ggggj^ 


FT 




'Cooz" and his inseparable program call the shots. 



Hock pulls it down and the fast break is in the making. 




John flashes down the lane. 



206 




Kneeling, Left to Right: Tom Kelly, Coach Bob Cousy, Capt. Ed 
Hockenbury, Assistant Coach Jack Magee, John Austin. 
Back Row, Left to Right: Senior Mgr. Jeff Muth, John Hoff, 
Buzz Chaney, Manny Papoula, Bob Rossi, Steve Adelman, Willie 



Wolters, Tom Pacynski, Jim Kissane, Ted Carter, Doug Hice, Ed 
Rooney, Steve Kelleher, Bill Dwyer, Bob Ward, Asst. Mgr. Fran 
Coffee. 



Won 


21, Lost 5 








Percentage .808 


*B.C. 


107 


Dartmouth 


84 


*B.C. 


95 


Colby 


79 


B.C. 


93 


Fairfield 


100 


B.C. 


89 


St. Joseph's 


107 


*B.C. 


90 


U. Conn. 


74 


B.C. 


98 


Holy Cross 


68 


B.C. 


95 


St. Mary's 


72 


B.C. 


101 


Massachusetts 


80 


*B.C. 


93 


Notre Dame 


89 


*B.C. 


96 


Fordham 


86 


B.C. 


87 


Georgetown 


85 


*B.C. 


73 


Boston Univ. 


62 


*B.C. 


86 


Colorado St. 


64# 


*B.C. 


94 


Navy 


78 


*B.C. 


92 


Army 


85# 


*B.C. 


94 


Tufts 


66t 


*B.C. 


86 


Providence 


91# 


B.C. 


112 


Seton Hall 


77 


B.C. 


99 


Rhode Island 


91 


*B.C. 


85 


Northeastern 


78t 


B.C. 


88 


N.Y.U. 


75 


*B.C. 


87 


Holy Cross 


83 


*B.C. 


70 


Northeastern 


63 


*B.C. 


96 


Louisville 


90** 


*B.C. 


77 


Providence 


79 






(3 0T) 










*B.C. 


85 


Villanova 


86** 



''Away Games — ^Holiday Festival — fBeanpot Tournament — **N.LT. 









Individual Scoring 














G 


FGA 


FGM 


FG% 


FTA 


FTM 


FT% 


RB 


PF 


PTS 


AVE 


John Austin 


22 


470 


189 


.402 


202 


170 


.812 


75 


58 


558 


25.4 


Steve Adelman 


26 


455 


241 


.530 


70 


40 


.571 


202 


63 


522 


20.1 


Willie Wolters 


26 


269 


142 


.528 


122 


82 


.672 


431 


82 


365 


14.1 


Doug Hice 


25 


161 


80 


.497 


86 


56 


.651 


76 


66 


216 


8.6 


Ed Hockenbury 


26 


172 


71 


.413 


56 


40 


.714 


89 


Ti 


183 


7.0 


Jim Kissane 


22 


120 


57 


.475 


53 


29 


.547 


140 


77 


143 


6.5 


Steve Kelleher 


23 


124 


50 


.403 


28 


16 


.572 


40 


59 


116 


5.0 


Jack Kvancz 


26 


85 


32 


.376 


59 


45 


.776 


34 


55 


109 


4.2 


Ted Carter 


13 


42 


13 


.309 


11 


7 


.636 


28 


16 


33 


2.5 


Bob Rossi 


22 


35 


14 


.400 


31 


19 


.613 


61 


29 


47 


2.1 


TEAM 


26: 


2017 


929 


.465 


753 


510 


.677 1394 611 2368 


91.1 


OPPONENTS 


26 1732 


751 


.445 


825 


590 


.715 1156 556 2092 


80.5 



207 



TRACK 




John Fiore 

All-American 





209 





210 



JSC'T^I ■'»^^ 







W^Tcp% 












212 





213 





Mark Sherwood and Charlie Babine 




Chuck Zaikowski, Joe Kopka, Larry Jeffers, and John Lyons. 
N.Y.C. K. of C. Mile Relay Champs 




Mike Connolly 



Billy Norris 



214 




Front Row (left to right) 

John Fiore, Paul Delaney, Mike Connolly, Charlie Babine. 

2nd Row (left to right) 

Andy Walsh, Terry Cochran, Jack Whelan, Cliff O'Brien, 

Tom Warwick, Clint O'Brien, Kevin O'Malley, Joe Teresi, 

John Lyons, Mark Sherwood, John Whelan, Dick Walsh, 

Joe D'Amico. 

Buoyed by outstanding performances by Kevin Killelea, 
Rick Reinhart, and Dan Cronin the 1965-66 edition of the 
B.C. Sailing team breezed to new heights. 

In all of the eight tourneys that the Maroon and Gold 
sailors entered they placed with a slate of one win, four 
seconds and two third place finishes. The victory was in the 
Potomac Frostbite Regatta against Georgetown and six other 
schools. 

In the meet that ranks at the top of the annual sailing 
campaign, the Greater Boston Dingy Championship, the 
Eagles grabbed the second place slot and became the runner 
up for the Orburg Trophy led by skippers Killelea and Hurley. 



3rd Row (left to right) 

John Normant, Art Kelly, Harry Fish, Billy Norris, Brian 
McNamara, Keith Lawrence, Joe Kupka, Larry Jeffers, Chuck 
Zaikowski, James Cavenaugh, William McTiernan, Chris 
Lane (Asst. Coach). 



SAILING 



TEAM 



(Left to Right) 

Emmet Logue, Tod Makley, Chuck Lamsr, Pete Gingras, Cathy 
King, Rick Reinhard, Jim Hayes, Jim Dinneen, Tom Connolly, 
Dan Cronin. 




During the relatively short time since its inception, the 
Boston College wrestling team has made remarkable strides. 
At seasons end, the squad was sporting an 8-2 slate, and sent 
a fine corps of entries into the New England Championships 
at M.I.T. 

The wrestlers won their meets over the likes of Holy Cross, 
U. Mass., Brandeis, and U.R.I, by wide margins, while their 
two defeats to the perennially strong Coast Guard Academy 
and a top rated Tufts team were by the narrowest of differ- 
ences. 

To the New England finals, B.C. sent two undefeated can- 
didates for the top spots in Dick Moses and Brian Froelich. 
Both of these matmen had brilliant seasons, Dick in the 
middleweight class and Brian in the 191 pound division. 
While neither had the fine fortune to place in the finals, they 
did much to increase the prestige of Boston College on the 
wrestling scene. With a potent nucleus returning next cam- 
paign, the outlook in this sport is nothing but bright. 




WRESTLING 



Varsity Wrestling Team 






Freshman Wrestling Team 




216 



BASEBALL 






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219 









220 







221 



SOCCER 



The number of minor sports continued to grow during the 
1965-66 sports seasons. Making the most progress during the 
year was the Soccer Club. Still on a "shoe-string" basis as the 
season opened, the Club played six scrimmage matches and 
was officially organized as a club. 

The opening and closing games of the season were the high- 
lights as the team defeated M.I.T.'s junior varsity, 4-1, and the 
Stonehill College varsity, 2-1, in scrimmages. The exciting play 
of goalie Matt Runci, fullback Rich Quinn, halfbacks Peter 
Ojinnaka, Carmine Sarno, and Pat O'Mahoney, and forwards 
Skip Gostyla, Charlie Ponera, Frank Mwaura, and Alex 
Kalindawalo accounted for the good showing by the Club. 

The future of the Club is bright as only one player, Captain 
Peter Ojinnaka, will be lost through graduation. Following the 
season, officers were elected to establish the Club as a recog- 
nized campus organization and arrange for the 1966 season. 
The officers are: Carmine Sarno, '68, President; Rich Quinn, 
'67, Treasurer; and Dan Connolly, '68, Secretary. Moderator 
for the Club and a guiding influence since the Club's founding 
is Prof. J. David Suarez of the Modern Language Department. 

Eventually, it is hoped that soccer will become a fully recog- 
nized varsity sport; but until such time it remains a student- 
supported Club that is serving as an example for others inter- 
ested in improving minor sports at B.C. 





Peter Ojinnaka, one of the Club founders, 
served as Captain during the 1965 season 
and was the top halfback on the team. 




Carmine "Saab" Sarno was elected President 
of the Club for the 1966 season and is one 
of the top halfbacks on the team. 



Top scorer on the team from his right inside 
position was Frank Mwaura, a sophomore, 
with eight goals in six games. 





SCRIMMAGE RESULTS 

B.C. 4 M.I.T. JUN. VARSITY 

B.C. 6 NEWTON HIGH 

B.C. 1 HARVARD JUN. VAR. 

B.C. 7 TUFTS LAW SCHOOL 

B.C. 6 BRANDEIS JUN. VAR. 

B.C. 2 STONEHILL 



Rich Quinn was the team's leading fullback 
and was elected Treasurer for the coming 
year. 



Charlie Ponera, another Club founder, was 
the center forward who finished second in 
scoring statistics. 





Boston College Rifle Team 



Dead-Eye Annie 



RIFLE CLUB 



The Boston College Rifle Club is operated under the super- 
vision of the Department of Military Science. The club's main 
objective is to encourage organized rifle shooting among the 
student body as well as to educate members in the safe handling 
and proper care of firearms. Improved marksmanship is fos- 
tered through intramural, intercollegiate and interclub com- 
petition. 

The Varsity Team ended a winning season by placing fourth 
in competition at the New England College Sectionals held at 
the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. The team 
also placed in the upper half of competition in a noncoUegiate 
professional league. 




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CHEERLEADERS 





224 



FEATURES 




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The Features section of the Sub 
Turri tends to be a rather nebulous 
division of the Yearbook. In it are 
contained sporting events, social oc- 
casions, cultural programs and resi- 
dent students — a seeming catch-all 
for unassorted odds-and-ends. 

Yet there remains a thematic unity 
running throughout this section. All 
of the various subjects included are 
bound together by the fact that they 
are a direct result of the extra effort 
expended by the students to make 
Boston College more than just a 
school ... to make it a life. 

Although all the subjects deserve 
explicit mention here, one stands 
out: the Boston College Humanities 
Series, which presented its most im- 
pressive array of speakers and per- 
formers to date, during the 1965-66 
year. 

It is our hope that in the remain- 
ing pages of this section we have 
adequately represented all those 
people, events and programs that, 
due to the added effort of Boston 
College students, were enabled to 
appear, or take place, this year at 
Boston College. 







conr'^"! 




THE BOSTON COLLEGE 
HUMANITIES SERUMS 

presents 



W. H. Auden 

q^eading from his poans 

Wednesday, February 23 r 

8-.00 P.M. 

WinlcrfeU 

Grand Ba»r.,om, Shcnuon Boston Hotel 

F ^ 




225 



Tuesday night, February 22, marked a milestone in the 
Boston College career of Coach John "Snooks" Kelley — his 
four -hundredth victory with the Eagles. 

The Dartmouth College hockey team was the losing team 
in an impressive Eagle game. Goals by Johnson, York, Mullen, 
Cunniff (2), and Clarke celebrated Snooks' four-hundredth 
victory with a 6-2 final tally. 

Over the years at Boston College, Coach Kelley has achieved 
a reputation which no other collegiate coach has ever come 
close to attaining. He is known by his fellow coaches as the 
"Dean of American Hockey", a title which is justly deserved 
on the testimony of his fine career record. 

Our sincere wishes for the best of luck in the future, 
Snooks ! 




The best "Congratulations" of all. 





Coach Kelley, in pensive mood. 



"400" 




'Thank You!' 



226 



Snooks Kelley with his "Victory Cake". 



J.A. 





John Austin and favorite fan Elliot "Hello" Davis. 



John Austin has meant a lot of things to Boston College 
basketball: broken records, All- American recognition, and post- 
season tournaments — all these hardly need mentioning. Be- 
yond these visible results, John has done something to B.C. 
basketball that no one else has been able to do — he has suc- 
ceeded in bringing "Big Time" basketball to the Heights, 
a nebulous phrase which describes an atmosphere more than 
something concrete. For instance, when B.C. is playing a top,- 
nationally ranked college, the fans knew that B.C. was cap- 
able of beating that team if everyone performed to capacity. 
This atmosphere of the possibility of beating a top team was 
lacking when John Austin first arrived at B.C. During the 
course of his four years John has produced this atmosphere 
which is here to stay ! 

The B.C. fans paid tribute to John following his scoring 
of thirty-one points against Seton Hall in the highest scoring 
game of the season. The score read: 112-77. John Austin 
received a tumultuous ovation for twenty minutes and was 
awarded a plaque on behalf of the student body as a token 
of its appreciation for making B.C. basketball "Big Time". 



John Austin's All-American form. 



R C A. C. 





Willie Wolters outjumping opponent. 



John Austin for two. 









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Doug Hice passing off. 




The week following Christmas has been an important one 
for Boston College during the past two years, since this is the 
week of the E.C.A.C. Basketball Tournament. And this year 
the BC Hoopsters wended their way to the finals before losing 
to Providence College. 

In the qualifying quarter-final round of play the Eagles 
faced a well-publicized Colorado State team led by Lonnie 
Wright. B.C. quickly deflated the Colorado State team by 
downing them 86-64. All American John Austin sparked the 
Eagles with 24 points, while Adelman and Wolters contributed 
16 points apiece. 

Following this the Eagles were up against the West Point 
Team, featuring Mike Silliman, and Bill Schutsky. B.C. was 
forced to hustle to beat an aggressive Army team by a final 
score of 92-85. Once again Austin led the scoring for B.C. 
with 25 points, while Captain Ed Hockenbury and Wolters 
each totaled 14 points. 

Providence College was the Eagles' final opponent in the 
tournament. Jim Walker of the winning Friars was the out- 
standing player of the game, scoring 50 points against the 
Eagles. This performance overshadowed B.C.'s team play which 
was climaxed by Willie Wolters' 26 points. 

Outstanding in the tournament was B.C.'s center Willie 
Wolters who, during the course of three games, scored 56 
points and brought down 63 rebounds. 



Wolters hooking for a deuce. 




Ed Hockenbury from outside. 



229 




Steve Adelman laying it up for two. 




Austin jumps for a pair. 




230 



Willie's newly-developed and effective hook. 



1 




John Austin accepts ninners-up award. 




Captain Ed Hockenbury accepts presentation on behalf of the team. 



231 



N. I. T. 



For the second time this season B.C. invaded Madison Square 
Garden for the National Invitational Tournament, providing 
another commendable exhibition for the 1965-66 season. 

The New York Times began its report of the qualifying 
game against Louisville in the following way: "It was incredi- 
ble. Not even in his finest hour as the basketball star of the 
Boston Celtics had Bob Cousy gone through such a night. 
. . . the final and most exciting game of day-night double- 
headers to advance to the quarter-final round of this 29th 
annual National Invitational Tournament last night in Madi- 
son Square Garden." 

At the end of the first half the Eagles and Louisville were 
tied up at 35 points apiece. With one second to play the score 
was 72-74 and it looked as though it were all over for the 
Eagles . . . until Captain Ed Hockenbury scored with a lay-up 
to tie the game and send it into three overtime periods before 
the Eagles finally won by a score of 96-90. Adelman, Hocken- 
bury and Wolters scored 32, 22 and 19 points, respectively; 
Wolters also came down with 20 rebounds to top-ranked 
Westley Unseld's 26. 

Indeed, it was a "most exciting game" for everyone at the 
Garden. 

Playing against Villanova University in the quarter-final 
round, Boston College did not fare so well. Villanova star 
Bill Melchionni had an outstanding game, scoring 30 points 
for the Wildcats and dominating the floor with his fine ball- 
handling. Although Steve Adelman outscored Melchionni with 
32 points and the Eagles closed up a 15-point gap to a single 
point in the second half, B.C. ran out of time with the final 
score remaining at 86-85. The absence of All- American John 
Austin, due to a foot injury, was sorely felt in this game. 

The unstoppable jump shot of Steve Adelman. 





Willie Wolters blocking Westley Unseld's pass. 



232 




Sophomore ball-handler Jack Kvancz passing to Steve 
Kelleher. 





Adelman scrambling for a loose ball. 




Hice up and in for two. 

Willie Welters, towering over his opponents' heads, for a pair. 



Adelman looking to pass off. 




233 




The Sheraton Plaza Ballroom. 



JUNIOR WEEK '65 



The Larry Elgart Orchestra. 



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"To the class of '66." 




After a period of nearly three full years the Class of '66 
climaxed its junior year's social season with the traditional 
Junior Week. The most memorable event of Junior Week was 
of course the Junior Prom staged in the ballroom of the 
Sheraton Plaza Hotel on Friday night, May 7. To the ac- 
companiment of the society music of the Les and Larry Elgart 
Orchestra and the society spirits of Johnnie Walker nearly 
five hundred couples enjoyed an evening not soon to be for- 
gotten. The crowning of Miss Mary Halligan as the Junior 
Class Queen culminated the evening. 

On Saturday night the Junior Class presented a distinctive 
concert incorporating a variety of entertainment. Opening the 
evening, the Charlie Byrd Trio performed a number of jazz 
scores for which the Trio is especially noted. But that was 
not nearly all: Charlie Byrd, exhibiting his versatility, played 
both classical and Flamenco guitar in addition to the jazz num- 
bers. Comedian Nipsey Russell then provided an interesting 
diversion from the musical portion of the concert with his 
comic and dance routines. Hi-lighting the evening was Astrud 
Gilberto singing Portugese and American numbers in her 
unique mesmerizing voice to the accompaniment of the Charlie 
Byrd Trio. 

Possibly the most entertaining event of Junior Week was 
the Junior Show Lil'l Abner presented on Thursday evening in 
Campion auditorium. Following upon long months of careful 
preparation under the direction of John Teter the show be- 
came a complete success. From the action of the Sadie Hawkins' 
Day scene to the intimate, harmonious tenderness of "Love in 
a Home" to the wedding finale the cast emanated such a spirit 
of having a ball on the stage that this feeling flowed over into 
the audience and contributed magnificently to the show's im- 
mense success. Especially to be complimented are the stars 
Kathy Maroney, Ed O'Reilly, and Jim Lennertz. 



'But Bob, it's a Waltz." 



235 




Happiness is . . . The Junior Prom 



Junior Week Queen, Miss Mary Halligan. 




236 




Miss Astrud Gilberto, headline attraction at concert. 



237 




namely you.' 




■'Jubilation T. Conpone, . . . The greatest.' 




The Dogpatch Stomp. 



A job well done. 




238 




JUNIOR SHOW 



"You think you're past -^our prime" ? 





'Hey, Mary's gonna put our town on the map." 



"Apassionata, you've got what it takes.' 



239 




FEATURED 
SPEAKERS 



Samuel Noah Kramer 





H. D. F. Kitto 



Jotham Johnson 




Poet W. H. Auden, reading his poems at Winterfest. 




Mr. William Sullivan, F. B. I. 



241 



DISTINGUISHED 

PERFORMERS 





Don Cossack "Knife Dance.' 



Grainne Yeats, harpist. 




Don Cossack Chorus. 



242 




The University Chorale, in concert 

Director of Chorale, Mr. C. Alexander Peloquin. 




243 



Deserving special praise for their role in presenting dis- 
tinctive concerts and eminent performers to the Boston College 
community are the Boston College Chorale and their director 
Mr. Alexander C. Peloquin. Ever since Mr. Peloquin has been 
at B.C. his main purpose has been to help students begin to 
gain an appreciation for the music of the great composers. 
In line with this policy Mr. Peloquin and the Chorale present- 
ed Miss Eileen Farrell on March 31, 1966. Perhaps Mr. Pelo- 
quin's philosophy is best expressed in his own words: "I don't 
care how much we lose financially — if the students turn out, 
then the concert is a success." Incidentally, the concert paid 
for itself. 






244 



JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD 




Dennis Amato. 




Fran Lynch. 




John Siebold. 



245 




THE CREATIVE t^TS 



Having an artist in residence on the Boston College campus 
presents a unique opportunity to any student inclined to ex- 
press himself in the plastic arts or in any of a number of 
mediums on canvas or paper. Mr. Allison Macomber, himself 
a distinguished portrait sculptor, has inaugurated a program 
to guide and assist aspiring artists. The first year student is led 
through an informal course of lectures and exercises introduc- 
ing him to the various basic mediums. In later courses, which 
are accredited, Mr. Macomber allows the student to work on 
individual projects and is always available to advise the student 
and criticize his work at any time during the creation. 

Mr. Macomber is presently at work upon a greater-than-life 
size bronze statue of former President Kennedy to be situated 
in front of the School of Social Sciences, soon to be erected. 






Antigone 




DRAMA 




A Phoenix Too Frequent. 





A Shadoiv in the Glen. 



A Phoenix Too Frequent. 



249 




"He really thinks he can build THE GREAT CAMPUS SOCIETY. 





'Ditch it Pax, here comes Handyman." 



TELEPHONE 






'■'•d. 




'And the Duke threw us out of honors.' 




Studying is easy once Denis is gone. 




SENIOR 
DORMS 





SENIOR 
APARTMENTS 




'This picture was real classy, until I stepped in." 



"Not another". 






Talk about "the life" 



'Sorry Sue, \'\c already got a date this w cckciul. 




Why didn't he go off-campus ? 




70 HOURS 




Thanks to the insomnious efforts of sophomore Bill 
McTague (alias Jerry Reynolds), WVBC of Boston College 
now holds the record, for college radio stations, of longest 
continuous broadcasting by one disc jockey, the record being 
seventy hours. Bill attributed this feat to the students who 
visited and phoned him and, of course, to those two unfailing 
friends, coffee and cigarettes. 

Rumor has it that Holy Cross, feeling extremely spiteful 
about repeated Boston College victories over them, decided to 
exceed Bill's record. Employing an assortment of pep pills, 
ice bags, and electric shock treatments Holy Cross was ru- 
mored to have continued for 75 hours. We here at B.C. find 
this hard to believe since the Holy Cross station was the only 
news medium to announce its dubious accomplishment. 





254 




The Highwaymen in concert. 



HOMECOMING '65 



Ullet and Hendra, also in concert. 




255 



Homecoming Weekend 1965, proved to be an exciting addi- 
tion to this year's social calendar. 

Friday e\ening featured an enjoyable concert given by the 
well known folk group, the Highwaymen. Also included in 
the program was the electrifying British comedy team of Ullet 
and Hendra. 

A thumping 38-7 victory over homesick Richmond high- 
lighted the gala festivities of Saturday afternoon. Halftime was 
graced by the presence of the Homecoming Queen and mem- 
bers of her court, escorted by members of B.C.'s 1940 Orange 
Bowl Team. The B.C. Band saluted the Class of '22; Charles 
Heffernan, Chairman of the Senior Interclass Council, pre- 
sented the "Favorite Son" award to Nat Hasenfus. After the 
accompanying pageant, spirits were high and certain to ignite 
the evening's activities at Victory Road. 

Dancing, gaiety and socializing were the order of entertain- 
ment Saturday night. The Boston College Dance Band, the 
Eagles of Sound, rendered one of its finest performances in 
flowing renditions found most enjoyable to the free-swinging 
crowd. An added touch of 'Rockin Rhythm' was provided by 
jimmy and the Jades. 

One sentiment pervaded the evening air, — another mem- 
or)-, but not just another Homecoming. 




Judy Burns, Homecoming Queen, and her escort. 



■Who cares if it is an armory ; 




256 




Homecoming Queen and her Court. 



"You've got a better idea?" 





"After the Ball is over . 



257 



EDUCATION SKITS 




Senior Skit: Off-W-^h/te and the Seven Dwarfs, with best actress Cece O'Malley. 




Junior Skit: The Sweet Sting of Romance. 



258 




Winning Sophomore Skit: Days of Wine and Robes. 




Frosh Skit: The Cat in the Hat Goes Back. 



259 




Mary Bishop in her winning mermaid costume at the Mardi Gras Ball. 




A soporific couple enraptured by the Shah of Iran 
and his favorite wife. 





Nice head ! 



The Lionel Hampton Band at the Statier Hilton 
Ballroom. 




W. E. R. M. Week King Art Kelly and half of U. C. O. C, George Billings. 



WINTER WEEKEND 





The Dave Brubeck Quartet who performed at Winter Weekend. 



261 




Queen Marilyn Benjamin and escort John Hauser. 



262 



MILITARY 
BALL 




The Grand March 




Capt. and Mrs. Schaefer and Maj. and Mrs Clark 



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Cadet Bob Cartwright and the "orders of the evening". 



263 



FUTURES 



The school year 1965-66 has marked an important turning 
point in the history of student-administration relations at 
Boston College. Following upon mounting resident student 
discontent over the food services at Boston College, an ad hoc 
committee was formed by Pete Driscoll, Tony De Luca, Jim 
Malone, Lenny Sienko and numerous associates toward the 
end of March. The committee, immediately coordinating its 
activities with those of the Council of Resident Men, proceeded 
to organize several orderly demonstrations to impress upon 
the administration the gravity of the situation and the neces- 
sity of immediate action. In response to these demonstrations 
Father Walsh, President of the University, met with a joint 
committee consisting of members of the ad hoc committee and 
the officers of the Council of Resident Men. At that time 
Fr. Walsh announced his decision to completely revamp the 
food services by hiring a national concessionaire and by mak- 
ing available a pay-as-you-go system if the students wished it. 

The implications of this action for the future of Boston 
College are many; we would like to emphasize several. That 
the administration can act quickly, when it wants to, is self- 
evident; we hope that such immediate attention will become 
policy, and not remain aberration, in the future. Likewise, we 
hope that the intimate and direct contact established between 
the top echelon of the administration and the students will 
continue as the norm, not the exception — which is only as 
it should be. We hope too that the attention and action of 
the administration will not have to be gained by demonstra- 
tions in the future — sincere interest on the part of the 
administration should suffice. Lastly, we hope that the general 
apathy which has characterized the student body in the past 
has been broken forever. If the members of the ad hoc com- 
mittee and those who marched are a true indication, then we 
can be sure that the apathy has died. 




Pete Driscoll. 




Tony De Luca. 



264 



GRADUATES 



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On the following pages you will 
find pictures of your classmates — 
fellow Seniors of the Class of 1966. 
Some you know well, others are 
barely familiar to you, and many 
you may not even realize are part of 
your class. But each one has made 
your years at Boston College among 
the best and most interesting of your 
life. The people you see on these 
pages may have danced with you 
at the Orientation Mixer, given you 
a ride when you were hitchhiking 
in the rain, or may be your closest 
friends for the rest of your life. 
Whether you know them or not, 
without any one of them, there 
would be something lacking from 
your conception of Boston College, 
Class of 1966. 



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265 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE 



266 




RICHARD E. BATSAVAGE 

A.B. Economics 



JOSEPH A. AUTH 
B.S. Mathematics 



PAUL K. BAILEY 
A.B. History 



267 




ALFRED R. BLAUVELT 

A.B. History 



"O Sole Mio" 



268 




GREGORY P. BURKE 

BS. Biology 



Visiting dignitaries 



269 




JAMES W. BUSH 

A.B. Classics 



THOMAS J. BURKE, JR 

A.B. History 



ROBERT E. BURNETT 

B.S. Chemistry 





THOMAS F. CANNON, JR. 

A.B. English and French 



WILLIAM S. CAREY 
A.B. English 



DAVID J. CALCHERA 

A.B. Psychology 



JOSEPH T. CAMPBELL 

A.B. Economics 




JAMES J. CASALETTO 
B.S. Mathematics 



JAMES J. CARROL 
A.B. English 



ROBERT J. CARROL 

A.B. English 





'Vox Populi" 






tf&fik 



JAMES D. CASHMAN CHARLES L CHANEY 

A.B. French B.S. Mathematics 




/- 



mk 



THOMAS J. CIGAS 
B.S. Chemistry 




THOMAS F. CLAFFEY 
B.S. Biology 





FRANCIS R. COFFEY 

A.B. Political Science 



JOHN T. COLL 

A.B. History 



ROBERT J. COAKLEY 

A.B. Economics 



JOSEPH J. COCOZZA 

A.B. Sociology 



271 




FELIX J. CONSILVIO DAVID G. CONSTANTINE 

A.B. History A.B. English 



Senior intramurals 




RICHARD COSKREN 

A.Ei Economics 



MICHAEL COSTELLO 

A.B. Political Science 



ROBERT V. COSTELLO 

A.B. Mathematics 



273 




WILLIAM H. COTTER, JR. 

A.B. Economics 



IP 



PAUL J. COUGHLAN 

A.B. History 




ROBERT A. CREEDEN 
A.B. Biology 




DANIEL I. CRONIN 

A.B. History 





"I just flunked theology.' 



FRANCIS A. CRONIN 
A.B. English 



DAVID M. CROWLEY 

A.B. Slavic Studies 



274 




JOSEPH D. DENUCCI 

A.B. Psycho. 



JAMES E. DESHARNAIS 
A.B. English 



JAMES K. DEVENEY 

B.S. Mathematics 




JOHN P. DOCHERTY 
B.S. Psychology 




JAMES B. DOLAN, JR. 
A.B. English 



MICHAEL R. DOHERTY 
B.S. Mathematics 



EDWARD J. DOLAN 
A.B. Sociology 



JOHN F. DOUCETTE 
A.B. Economics 





EDWARD R. DOWNES 

A.B. Mathematics, Philosophy 



JOHN J. DOYLE 

A.B. Economics 



276 




RICHARD J. FARRICKER 

A.B. History 



RICHARD J. FALCO 

A.B. English 



WILLIAM J. FALLON 
B.S. Mathematics 



111 



mmk 



LAWRENCE J. FEENEY 
A.B. Sociology 




ARTHUR A. FERRANCE 
A.B. Economics 



ROBERT V. FERNANDEZ 
B.S. Natural Sciences 



RICHARD P. FINN 
A.B. Mathematics 




OWEN J. FLANNERY 

A.B. History 



"Big boys like you shouldn't cry." 



278 




CARMEN R. FUCILLO 

A.B. Psychology 



JOHN J. FORDE 
A.B. Economics 



MARTIN J. FORREST 
A.B. Economics 



279 




LOUIS C. GABORIAULT 

A.B. Economics 



THOMAS J. GALLIGAN 
B.S. Biology 





mkmk 



RONALD A. GAUDETTE 
A.B. Mathematics 



EDWARD F. GAVIN 
B.S. Biology 






ROBERT F. GEARY 
A.B. English 






i\k 



VINCENT J. GENNACO 

A.B. Psychology 




RICHARD J. GERRIOR 

A.B. Political Science 



LAURENCE W. GIBSON, JR. 

A.B. Government 




THOMAS J. GOGER 
A.B. English 



JOHN 1. GORMAN 
A.B. English 



PAUL J. GRAMLING 
B.S. Biology 




LUBOMYR ANDRI J. HAJDA THOMAS F. HANLEY 

A.B. History A.B. Sociology 



RICHARD K. GROSS 

A.B. History 






JAMES E. GUSTAFERRO 
A.B. English 




ii 




CHARLES H. HANSON 
A.B. Mathematics 



JOHN R. HAUSER Education seminar 



A.B. Economics 




JOSEPH A. HAYDEN 

A.B. English 



P^^^ 



THOMAS A. HEALY CHARLES J. HEFFERNAN, JR 

A.B. History A.B. Political Science 




ROBERT W. HINSON 

A.B. Economics 



JOHN F. HODGMAN 

A.B. Political Science 



283 




JOHN E. HUNT, JR 

A.B. Biology 



CARLETON D. JOHNSON 

A.B. History 



REGINALD H. JONES 
B.S. Biology 



284 





KEVIN P. KEENE 

A.B. Economics 



JAMES E. KEHOE 

A.B. Economics 




GEOFFREY P. KANE WILLIAM M. KEANE 

B.S. Biology B.S. Biology 



JOSEPH T. KELLEY 

B.S. Mathematics 




ALAN E. KELIHER 
B.S. Biology 




THOMAS E. KELLY 

A.B. English 



THOMAS J. KELLER 

A.B. History 



GERALD K. KELLEY 

A.B. History 




JOHN R. KILXGOAR 

A.B. Political Science 



Experimental kitchen 





at^ ^S"* 



KEVIN M. KILLILEA 
A.B. Economics 



^ 



JOSEPH A. KING 

A.B. History 




MICHAEL L. KINSELLA 

A.B. Economics 



EDWARD W. KIRK 

A.B. History 





JOHN T. KORYTOWSKI 

A.B. Political Science 



PAUL B. KOURTZ 

B.S. Physics 




CARL F. KOWALSKI 

A.B. English 



DONALD L. KRAMER 

B.S. Biology 



Education seminar 



287 




"No more calls, we have a winner 




MICHAEL J. KURYLO 
B.S. Chemistry 




ANDREW V. LaCROIX 

BS. Geology 




P. MICHAEL LAHAN 

BS. Biology 



WILLIAM F. LALLY 

A.B. English 




WILLIAM F. LAMOND 

A.B. History 




JAMES D. LAWLOR 
B.S. Biology 



FRANCIS GRAHAM LEE 
A.B. Political Science 




PAUL F. L'ESPERANCE 

A.B. Economics 



SAMUEL J. LEVIS, JR. 

A.B. History 



PAUL W. LANGLOIS 
B.S. Biology 



ROBERT LELIEUVRE 

A.B. Psyc 



JOHN J. LANGONE 

B.S. Chemistry 




JAMES E. LENNERTZ 
A.B. Political Science 




RICHARD H. LEWIN 

B.S. Biology 



ADAM J. LEWIS, JR. 
B.S. Physics 



289 




JAMES M. MAFFEI 
A.B. Economics 



LAWRENCE S. MAGDALENSKI 
A.B. Economics 



290 




EDWARD B. MANNING 
A.B. Economics 



FRANK E. MANNING, JR. 

A.B. English 



291 




DENNIS M. McCarthy 

A.B. History 



JAMES T. McCarthy 

A.B. Sociology 



RICHARD McCarthy 

A.B. En dish 



292 




BRIAN E. McFARLAND 

A.B. Economics 



JAMES L. McDonald 

A.B. Economics 



WILLIAM J. Mcdonald 

A.B. Economics 



293 




STEPHEN M. MILLER 
A.B. Asian Studies 



DANIEL J. MINAHAN 
B.S. Geology 



"I drempt I was at the Tarn in my maiden-form bra.' 



294 




JEFFREY B. MUTH 

A.B. English 



RICHARD E. MULCAHY, JR. RALPH K. MULFORD, III 

B.S. Physics A.B. Political Science 



295 





THOMAS M. NEVILLE 

A.B. Political Science 




DENNIS M. NOLAN 

A.B. Economics 



Okay girls, take it from the top 




FRANCIS X. NOLAN 

A.B. Economics 



RICHARD D. NORBERG 

B.S. Biology 



296 







PAUL F. O'BRIEN 
A.B. Economics 



PETER S. I. OJINNAKA 

A.B. Economics 



FRANK J. PADOS, JR. 

A.B. Economics 



PAUL F.X. O'BRIEN 

A.B. English 




JAMES F. O'CONNOR 

A.B. Ma/hematics 




EDWARD F. OLOSKEY 

A.B. Political Science 



RICHARD J. PALMACCIO 

B.S. Mathematics 



ROGER O. PAQUIN 
A.B. Economics 



THOMAS P. O'CONNOR 

B.S. Chemistry 




EDWARD J. O'REILLY 

A.B. Ecotiomics 




PAUL K. PATTENGALE 

B.S. Biology 



297 




JOSEPH K. PHIPPS 

A.B. French 



DONALD J. PERREAULT 
A.B. History 



JAY S. PERREAULT 
A.B. English 



298 




JOSEPH A. RAFFAELE 

A.B. Economics 



WILLIAM A. RAMBLER 

A.B. Political Science 



EDWARD J. REARDON 

B.S. Biology 



299 





ROBERT F. REYNOLDS 

A.B. History 



LAWRENCE E. RICCI 
A.B. Economics 





DONALD P. RICKLEFS 

A.B. Economics 



JAMES E. RITACCO 

B.S. Biology 



DAVID M. ROCHE 
A.B. Economics 



FRANCIS J. ROCHE 
A.B. History 





WILLIAM J. ROMAN, JR. 
A.B. Economics 



WILLIAM S. ROONEY 
B.S. Geology 



300 




HENRY M. SCHLIFF, JR. LUCIAN J. SCLAFANI, JR. 

A.B. Psychology , B.S. Biology 



RICHARD R. SANTERRE RALPH A. SANTOPIETRO, JR. 

A.B. French A.B. Economics 



301 




MICHAEL A. SICILIANO FRANK A. SIKORA 

A.B. French B. 



302 




GEORGE W. ST. GEORGE 

A.B. Mathematics 



ALEXANDER R. STANKUNAS 
B.S. Chemistry 



CYRIL J. STATT 
B.S. Biology 



303 




JOSEPH F. SZYMANSKI 
A.B. Sociology 



ALBERT F. TEBBETTS 
A.B. English 



JOHN M. TETER 

A.B. English 



304 




RICHARD C. TURNER 

A.B. Classics 



Eagles fly higher 



305 




ROBERT GUNNIP 
A.B. Psychology 



DENIS E. WALSH 
A.B. Economics 



THOMAS A. WALSH 
A.B. Economics 



306 




DAVID W. WHELAN 

A.B. Economics 



JOHN M. WOOD 

A.B. Political Science 



WILLIAM F. ZAK 
A.B. English 



307 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 



308 




JAMES F. BARRY 
B.S. Market! )!g 



CHARLES F. BABIN 

BS. Accounting 



DANE E. BAIRD 

BS. Economics 



309 




THOMAS V. BENNETT 
B.S. Economics 



GUID BERAK 
B.S. Production 




RONALD J. BLFAKNEY 
B.S. Production 



JOHN W. BIGGS 
B.S. Accounting 



HENRY C. BLAHA 
B.S. Marketing 



310 




GERARD F. BOUDREAU 
B.S. Accounting 




JOHN M. BROSNAN 
B.S. Economics 



PAUL F. BRAUNEIS 
B.S. Accounting 



JAMES M. BRYAN 
B.S. Marketing 



JOHN B. BRAWLEY 
B.S. Marketing 




"Check the babe on the right.' 



311 




JOHN J. CANNON 

BS. Finance 



PAUL W. CARDELLO 
BS. Production 



KEVIN W. CARMODY 
B.S. Economics 



312 





ANDREW L. CARNEGIE, JR. LAWRENCE D. CARUSO 
B.S. Accounting B.S. Accounting 




EDWARD F. CASEY 

B.S. Production 



WALTER J. CASEY 

B.S. Accounting 




RICHARD E. CHIOZZI 

B.S. Finance 



LEE FRANCIS CIULLA 

B.S. Marketing 



313 




JAMES E. CLEARY 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL T. CLIFFORD 

B.S. Accounting 




JOHN E. COLEMAN 
BS. Accounting 



TOMOTHY K. COLLINS 
B.S. Accounting 






n ik 



JAY KENNETH CONKLIN MICHAEL JAMES CONLEY 
B.S. Economics B.S. Finance 




Another can of alumni spirit 




THOMAS J. CONNELLY 
B.S. Marketing 



GRAFTON J. CORBETT III 

B.S. Accounting 



314 





ROBERT H. CORNISH 
B.S. Marketing 



MORGAN J. COSTELLO 
B.S. Marketing 



ANDREW C. CORRINET 
B.S. Finance 




RICHARD L. COUTO 
B.S. Finance 




RICHARD S. DANIELS 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN F. CREEDON 
B.S. Economics 



MICHAEL P. CRESPI 

B.S. Finance 



315 




"Hmm, two bedrooms, 130 dollars per month.' 



THOMAS L. DAY 

B.S. Marketing 



JOHN M. DEAN 
B.S. Acco»niing 




PAUL G. DELANEY 
B.S. Marketing 



CHARLES J. DEEGAN CHRISTOPHER P. DEERING 

B.S. Economics B.S. Production 




'Wk if^' 



ik 



ANTHONY L. DeLUCA 
B.S. Finance 



316 





I 






LARRY T. DeSILVA 
B.S. Accoinitinii 



JOHN B. DeLUCA 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT D. DiLORETO 

B.S. Accounting 



STEPHEN A. DEMPSEY 
B.S. Production 




DAVID A. DiMUZIO 
B.S. Accounting 



MARTIN D. DiMEZZA 

B.S. Marketing 



ANTHONY V. DeSIMONE 
B.S. Finance 




EDWARD F. DOHERTY 

B.S. Marketing 




CHARLES F. DOLAN 
B.S. Finance 



317 





MICHAEL D. DONOVAN VICTOR G. DRAGONE, JR. 

B.S. Finance B.S. Finance 




DANIEL M. DRISCOLL 
BS. Production 



CHARLES J. EAGAN 

BS. Accounting 




CHRISTIAN H. EIDT 
B.S. Accounting 




^ iM 



MARTIN J. FEENEY JOHN C. FERNEY 

B.S. Accounting B.S. Marketing 




Intellectual stimulation 



318 




C. J. FITZPATRICK 
B.S. Accounting 



mk^ 



FREDERICK A. FLAVIN 
B.S. Marketing 



PAUL J. FLEMING 

B.S. Production 




THOMAS J. FLINN III 
B.S. Accounting 



EDWARD C. FOLEY 

B.S. Marketing 



319 




KEVIN R. GEANEY 
B.S. Finance 



RONALD A. GENTILI 
B.S. Marketing 



MAURICE L. GIGUERE 
B.S. Finance 



320 




■i^ Hk 



WILLIAM A. GILBERT EDWARD M. GLASHEEN, JR. 

BS. Marketing B.S. Finance 




THEODORE H. GOGUEN 

BS. Economics 



WILLIAM F. GOUR 
B.S. Marketing 





MARK A. GRAY, JR. 
B.S. Economics 



PAUL E. GRICUS 
B.S. Finance 



321 




One more for the zoo 



KEVIN F. HARRINGTON 

B.S. Finance 



PAUL S. HARTWELL 
B.S. Accounting 



322 




DANIEL C. HOSTETTER 

B.S. Marketing 



CHARLES W. HIBBETT 
B.S. Finance 



EDWARD J. HOCKENBURY 
B.S. Finance 



323 




WILLIAM P. JOHNSON 

B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD F. HURLEY 

B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM S. HURLEY 
B.S. Accounting 





dk£i 




RICHARD W. JONES 
B.S. Accounting 



WADE JONES 
B.S. Marketing 



'Why don't the three of us take over the school : 



324 




KEVIN T. KELLEY 

B.S. Accomiting 



WALTER H. KELLEHER 

B.S. Marketing 



JOHN B. KELLEY 

B.S. Production 



325 




DONALD J. KELLIHER 

BS. Accounthig 



JOHN F. KELLY 
B.S. Accounting 



HENRY K. KELLY 

BS. Accounting 




WALTER H. KIRBY 
B.S. Finance 






JOHN R. LAMONT 

B.S. Finance 



RICHARD F. LANDRIGAN 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM J. KRACKELER 
B.S. Accounting 



DOUGLAS G. KREIN 
B.S. Marketing 



326 





CARL A. LANZILLI 
B.S. Finance 



Seven-Up . . . where there's action ! 



WILLIAM E. LAUER, JR. 
B.S. Marketing 



ALAN WAYNE LEAFFER 
B.S. Accounting 



JEFFREY C. LAPOINTE 

B.S. Economics 




EDWARD G. LAWSON 

B.S. Accounting 




JOHN F. LEAHY 
B.S. Production 



RICHARD J. LEETCH 

B.S. Marketing 



327 




"But mother, I can't come home for dinner!' 



THOMAS P. LUFKIN 

B.S. Marketing 



FRANCIS C. LYNCH 

B.S. Economics 



328 




JOHN E. LYNCH 

B.S. Accouitting 




CHESTER J. MACIEROWSKI EDMUND A. MACKSOUD 
B.S. Economics B.S. Marketing 





RONALD S. MacLACHLAN LESLIE L MADDEN, JR. 

B.S: Marketing B.S. Finance 



KENNETH M. MAFFEI STEPHEN P. MAHONEY 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Accounting 




ROBERT E. MALONEY MICHAEL T. MANNING 

B.S. Finance B.S. Economics 



329 




PAUL F. McCarthy 

B.S. Prod/iction 



PAUL V. McCarthy 

B.S. General Business 



imMm 



GREGORY A. McCORMACK JOSEPH L. McCORMACK 

B.S. Finance B.S. Production 



330 




EDWARD J. McELANEY RICHARD F. McGOWAN 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Marketing 



RICHARD H. McCORMACK 

B.S. Finance 



BRIAN D. McDERMOTT 
B.S. Finance 





STUART J. McGregor 

B.S. Accounting 



JOSEPH J. McGRATH 
B.S. Marketing 




GEORGE C McMURTRY 

B.S. Marketing 



JEFFREY J. McNAMARA 
B.S. Finance 



All the news that's fit to print 



331 




CHARLES E. MORRISON 

B.S. Marketing 



GERALD F. MOORE 
B.S. Accounting 



MAURICE P. MORIARTY 
B.S. Accounting 



332 




THOMAS B. MULHEARN CHRISTOPHER O. MULLANEY 
BS. Economics B.S. Marketing 



333 




CHRISTOPHER C. MUNGOVAN DAVID J. MUNGOVAN 
B.S. Economics B.S. Accounting 




RICHARD G. MURPHY 

B.S. Finance 



BRIAN M. MURPHY 
B.S. Acconntinv 



JOHN J. MURPHY, JR. 

B.S. Marketing 



334 




JAMES L. O'CONNOR 
B.S. Acco»nthig 



JOSEPH T. O'CONNOR 
BS. Marketing 



ROGER P. O'CONNOR 

B.S. Finance 



EDWARD J. O'DONNELL 
B.S. Marketing 




335 




BRIAN T. O'NEILL 
BS. Finance 



Reader of the Week 



336 




GERALD J. PASQUANTONIO DAVID I. PATENAUDE 
B.S. Finance B.S. Finance 



PAUL J. PATTURELLI 
B.S. Accounting 



JAMES E. PERRY 
B.S, Finance 



337 




ANTHONY R. PICARELLO PHILIP A. PISANO, JR 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD J. POPE 
B.S. Production 



JOHN R. POWERS 

B.S. Accounting 




MICHAEL P. PUCCIA 
B.S. Marketing 



"You're ugly . . . and your mother dresses you funny.' 



338 




ALAN C. RENDA 
D.S. Production 



339 




ARTHUR S. RYAN, JR. 
B.S. Fitiance 



"Sure, there's gonna be a referendum.' 



340 




JAY A. SCHMITT 

BS. Finance 



CHARLES H. SAMPSON 

BS. Finance 



JOHN R. SATTELMAIR 
BS. Marketing 





'*'~«l^ STEPHEN P. SCIBELLI, JR. 
-'-<2>0 * B.S. Marketing 



JOSEPH A. SERGI 
B.S. Marketing 



"This little piggy went to market." 



341 




CHARLES P. SMITH 
B.S. Finance 



RICHARD C. SMITH 

B.S. Finance 



342 




JOHN E. SUMM 
B.S. Marketing 



WILLIAM F. SWIFT 

B.S. -Marketing 



343 





RICHARD F. SYRON 
B.S. Economics 



DONALD D. TARZIA 
B.S. General Business 




JOSEPH P. TA VILLA 
B.S. Marketing 



RICHARD S. TAYLOR 
B.S. Finance 




Hully , 



Aii 



PAUL B. TIERNEY 
B.S. Economics 




RICHARD J. TOBIN 

B.S. Marketing 



344 




GEORGE W. TODD 
B.S. Accounting 



BRYON G. TOSI, JR. 

BS. Marketing 



DAVID P. ULIN 
B.S. Accounting 



EDWARD W. TOOMEY 
B.S. Marketing 




NEIL P. TRUMBOUR 
B.S. Market 171 g 




DALE F. URBANIK 
B.S. Marketing 




Gully 



345 




*^, 




f TCT ' 



ji 




PETER J. VENETO 
B.S. General B?/smess 



RICHARD G. WALSH 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN JOSEPH VANBUREN CHARLES H VAIIGHN, JR 
B.S. Accounting BS hcononms 




ROBERT R. WHEELER JOHN P. WILKINS 

B.S. Finance B.S. Production 



546 




JOHN A. WILLIAMSON 
B.S. Markethig 



ROBERT A. WILSON 
B.S. Marketing 




THOMAS J. WILSON 
B.S. Economics 



THEODOR C. ZIZLSPERGER 

B.S, Economics 




'Just ignore the windows. 



347 




SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 




PATRICIA C. BELLEW 
B.S. English 



CLAIRE L. BOCCIA 

B.S. English 



ELLEN G. BOWLER 
B.S. English 



349 




KATHLEEN M. BROWN 
BS. History 



KATHLEEN A. BRENNAN 
B.S. Elementary Education 



CAROL A. BROWN 
5.5. Elementary Education 




DANIEL C. BUCCI 

BS. History 



MAURA D. BUCKLEY 
BS. Elementary Education 





Dedication of Roncalli Hall 



THOMAS L. BULGAR 

BS. History 



EDMUND S. BURKE 
B.S. English 



350 




KATHLEEN A. CANAVAN 
B.S. English 



MARGARET A. CANTY 
B.S. Elementary Education 



351 




ELIZABETH M. CARBONE 
B.S. Elementary Education 



JANE E. CARON 
B.S. Elementary Education 




JOYCE C. CANTANZANO 

B.S. Mathematics 



JOYCE M. CHAPMAN 
B.S. Eletnentary Education 




MARTHA L. COLLINS 
B.S. Elementary Education 



PATRICIA E. COMISKEY 
B.S. French 




CATHERINE A. CARTY 
B.S. Eletnentary Education 



FRANK C. CASTALDO 

B.S. English 





JOAN R. CICCHETTI 
B.S. English 



JEAN E. COLLINS 
B.S. Elementary Education 




PAULA M. CORBETT 
B.S. Elementary Education 



MELANIE A. CORONETZ 
B.S. French 



352 




'Forsooth" 




JAMES W. COTTON 
B.S. His/orj 




PAMELA E. CRONIN 
B.S. Elementary Education 



ELLEN M. COYNE 
1.5. Elementary Education 




^ «n 


f 






>• 


/ 








1 









ANNE MARIE P. CYR 
B.S. Elementary Education 




LOUIS A. D'AGNESE 
B.S. History 



JOSEPH A. D'AMICO 
B.S. History 



353 




Zounds 




JOANN T. DiPERNA 
B.S. Elementary Education 



FRANCES E. DELANY 
B.S. Special Education 



JOHN J. DOHERTY 

B.S. History 



JOAN M. DEL SORDO 
B.S. English 




MARY T. DOLAN 
B.S. History 



JANET R. DOYLE 
B.S. Chemistry 



354 




RONALD GARIBOTTO 
B.S. Latin 



CLARE A. GASPARI 
5.5. Elementary Education 



355 




MAUREEN F. GLYNN 
B.S. Mathematics 



ROSE M. GENOVA 
B.S. Alathetnatics 



ANN D. GIESEN 
B.S. Elet?ientary Education 





PATRICIA M. GUILFOYLE 
B.S. History 



CLAIRE P. HALEY 
B.S. Elementary Education 



SISTER MARIE GORETTI GREY HAROLD M. GRODEN 
B.S. English B.S. English 



f 




MARY C. HALLIGAN 
B.S. Chemistry 



KENNETH M. HAMILTON 
B.S. English 



356 




DEBORAH S. HARRIS SISTER MARY CECELIA, F.M.S. 
B.S. History B.S. English 





MARY ANN C. HAYES 
BS. English 



ROBERT A. HAYES 
B.S. History 




i^ik 



DANIEL X. HEALEY 

BS. English 





BERNADINE C. HUGHES RICHARD J. HUTCHINSON 

B.S. English B.S. English 



KATHERINE M. HOSIE 

B.S. English 



357 




DORIS P. KASTORF 
B.S. Elementary Education 



PAULA B. JUDGE 
B.S. Eiii^lish 



BARBARA A. KANE 
B.S. Elementary Education 



338 




Seniors at Syracuse 



ELIZABETH M. LANDRY 
B.S. Elemei2/ary Education 



DIANE E. LEE 

'.5. Elementary Education 



559 




PATRICIA A. LENTINE 
BS. Mathematics 



JOHN H. L'HEUREUX 

BS. History 



MARIANNE T. MAHONEY 
BS Special Education 




JANET M. LIBBEY 
S. Blementarj Education 



MARY B. LOHOSKI 

BS. Elementary Education 




MARGUERITE M. MAZZONE JANICE A. MAZZOTTA 

B.S. Elementary Education B.S. French 



360 




JOAN M. McAULIFFE 
B.S. Elementary Education 




MICHAEL B. McCarthy 

B.S. Spanish 










mk 



JOHN A. Mcdonald 

B.S. History 





MAUREEN T. McCARTHY 
B.S. Elementary Education 




MARYELLEN McCLUSKEY 
B.S. French 




Study break 



ANNE M. McDonnell 

B.S. English 



361 




MAUREEN J. MOLONEY 
B.S. Elementary Education 



DAVID E. MOORE 

B.S. History 



PAMELA E. MOORE 
B.S. Mathematics 



I 



362 




GRACE M. OBERHAUSER 
B.S. Elementary Education 



ANN MARIE O'BRIEN 

B.S. Elementary Education 



363 




NANCY M. O'BRIEN 
B.S. Elementary Education 




KAREN A. O'LEARY 

5.5. Elementary Education 





CECELIA R. O'MALLEY 
B.S. English 



ROBERT H. ONEIL 
B.S. Latin 



364 




GLORIA E. RAZUAD 
B.S. Elemei?fai-y Education 



LEONA P. POPLAWSKI ELAINE M. PRENDERGAST 

B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Elementary Education 



JEANNE G. RICCI 
B.S. Elementary Education 




BARBARA A. ST. PIERRE 
B.S. Elementary Education 



FRANCIS L. RILEY 
B.S. Mathematics 



THOMAS W. ROYLES 
B.S. German 



365 




MAURA C. SULLIVAN 

BS. English 



JOANNE E. STRAGGAS 
BS. Mathematics 



MARY J. STRUZZIERY 

BS. English 



566 




MAUREEN E. SULLIVAN 
B.S. Elementary Education 




JOAN V. SZYNAL 
B.S. Elementary Education 




RICHARD L. THORNE 

B.S. Mathematics 



PATRICIA E. SULLIVAN 
B.S. Mathematics 




RAYMOND J. TOMBARI 
B.S. Mathematics 



ROBERT N. TORAN 
B.S. English 



MARGUERITE R. TORTORICI 
B.S. Enalish 



367 




DAVID TRA VERSO 
B.S. History 







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JAN A. VAN DEN BERGHE MARK H. VAN DEN BERGHE 
BS. History B.S. History 




KATHLEEN M. WALSH 
B.S. English 



PAUL F. WHITE 
5.5. German 




THOMAS K. YOUNG, JR. 

B.S. English 



LORRAINE E. ZAILSKAS 
B.S. Biology 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 




KATHLEEN M. AHEARN 
B.S. Nursing 



DENISE M. BARBARA 
B.S. Nursing 






MARY A. BISHOP 
B.S. Nursing 




ROSE MARIE BRAULT 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY E. BARTER 

B.S. Nursing 




MARIA C. CHINES 
B.S. Nursing 



CECELIA M. BRODNER 

B.S. Nursing 



CLAUDIA S. COLLINS 
B.S. Nursing 



SHEILA A. BELANGER 
B.S. Nursing 













PATRICIA R. BURTON 
B.S. Nursing 




DIANE K. CONNOR 
B.S. Nursing 



JANE M. COUGHLIN 
B.S. Nursing 



371 




JACQUELINE E. DANSEREAU PATRICIA M. DONOVAN 
B.S. Nursing BS. Nursing 



KATHLEEN P. CURLEY 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN M. CUSTEAU 
B.S. Nursing 




V^ 



MARY ELLEN DRISCOLL 
B.S. Nursing 



PAULA M. DUMAS 
B.S. Nursing 





'Why do I always have to play on the boy's team ': 



DORIS G. ELKEVICH 
B.S. Nursing 



MARGARET E. EMBLER 
B.S. Nursing 



372 




KATHLEEN M. GAUMONT 
B.S. Nursing 



ANNE I. GLASER 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY M. GORMAN 
B.S. Nursini' 



ELEANOR G. HACKING 
B.S. Nursintr 



373 



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BARBARA L. HALL 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA W. HAMMOND 
BS. Nursing 





VIRGINIA M. HEALY 

B.S. Nursing 



MARYELLEN HERLIHY 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY A. HEFFERNAN 
B.S. Nursing 




JEANNE M. HOLLAND 
B.S. Nursing 




DOROTHY E. HORGAN KATHRYN M. KARPAWICH 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 



"How can they skate on a wooden floor?' 



374 




MARGARET E. KEEFFE 
B.S. Nursing 



MARGERY B. LALLAS 
B.S. Nursing 



DOROTHY M. KILEY 

B.S. Nursing 





JEANNINE C. LAPIERRE 
B.S. Nursitig 



ALMA T. LAVALLEE 
B.S. Nursing 




BARBARA A. MAGGIACOMO JANE M. MALONEY 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 



Speechless — as usual. 



375 




ROSEMARY E. McCOLGAN KATHRYN L. McENELLY 

BS. Nz/rshig B.S. Nursing 



1,16 



I 




DENISE A Ml'RRAY 
S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN P. MURRAY 
B.S. Nursing 



CAROLYN A. MEEGAN 
B.S. Nursing 



CORRINE R. MENDOLIA 
B.S. Nursing 



377 




ULANA N. MUSIJ 
BS. Nursing 



ANNMARIE O'CONNOR 
B.S. Nursing 



CAREN M. O'BRIEN 
B.S. Nursing 




MARY-ANN OSKINIS 

B.S. Nursing 




MARY E. PADLON 
B.S. Nursing 



JANICE M. PATALANO 
B.S. Nursing 




"Where?" 



378 




EVA MARIE REDD 
B.S. Nursing 



DONNA J. RENZ 
B.S. Nursing 



379 




CYNTHIA C. SCALZI 
B.S. Nursing 




SANDRA H. STEFANICK 
B.S. Nursing 




MARTHA TILLEY 
B.S. Nursing 



EMILIE F. SUCHNICKI 
B.S. Nursing 



HELEN TARAZEWICH 
B.S. Nursing 



380 








VALERIE A. TUSCHMANN DOROTHY A. TYNDALL 
5.5. Nursing B.S. Nursing 



MARTHA L. TRIBBLE 
B.S. Nursing 



LOUISE J. TRIFILO 
B.S, Nursing 




CHRISTINE M. WEAFER 
B.S. Nursing 



JUDITH A. WISOWATY 
B.S. Nursing 





SUSAN M. YERBURGH 
B.S. Nursing 



DANIELLE A. ZENOBI 
B.S. Nursing 



381 




GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 




JOAN M. DUANE 
B.S. Nursing 



ELIZABETH M. FOLEY 
B.S. Nursing 



BARBARA E. HANLEY 
B.S. Nursing 



383 




CALLISTA A. RASICOT 
B.S. Nursing 



DONA A. McGEE 
BS. Nursing 



CAROL JEAN MOLINO 
B.S. Nursing 



384 




MARIA L. SANTOPIETRO 
B.S. Nursing 



SISTER MARGUERITE TYRRELL 
B.S. N ursine 



'Here, let Mama wipe your nose.' 



385 




EVENING COLLEGE 



386 




RICHARD W. FINNEGAN 
A.B. Social Science 



MAUREEN B. FORDE 
B.S. Education 



WARREN J. COSTEDIO 
B.S. General Business 



MARGARET A. EMINIAN 

A.B. French 





MARY ELLEN HALLION MARGUERITE F. HYLAND 

B.S. Education B.S. Education 



DANIEL A. FRAZER 
B.S. General Business 



NORMAN J. HALL 
B.S. General Business 



387 




JEAN L. MORRISSEY 

A.B. English 



ANNE M. McNICHOL 
A.B. History 



PAUL F. McPARTLIN 
A.B. History 



388 




ROBERT H. PENDER 
B.S. General Bushiess 



'Whadda ya mean, 'What's the Winter Whirl' 



389 




GABRIELLE SULLIVAN 
A.B. English 



MARGARET M. WALSH 

A.B. English 



JOHN S. YOCUM 
B.S. General Business 







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PATRONS AND 
ADVERTISMENTS 



PATRONS 



Mr. Edward R. Ahearn 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Airasian 

Mr. Joseph W. Aldonis 

Patsey R. Ambrose 

Mrs. John J. Amero 

Mr. and Mrs. Americo Amodio 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. Amorosi 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Anastasio 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Anton 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Antonucci 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Anzalotti 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Aarlinghaus 

Judge Charles J. Artesani 

Alexander T. Arthurs, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Aurilio 

Mr. Anthony S. Avallone 

Mr. Lawrence P. Avery 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard J. Aylward 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Baichi 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. George Baler 

Mr. John J. Balfe, Jr. 

Mrs. John Ballantine 

Gerald J. Barry 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Barry 

Paul E. Barber, M.D. 

Edward I. Barton 

John C. Barzen 

Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Bates 

Mr. and Mrs. Emmette W. Beauchamp 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard W. Belter 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Bench 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Bergeron 

Jorge Bermudez 

George H. Barry 

Dr. and Mrs. Anacheto Berillo 

Norman N. Berube 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. Bien 

Mrs. John W. Biggs 

Edward T. Bigham, Jr., Atty. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. O. Blanchard 

Herbert Block 

Dominick Wm. Boccia 

Mr. and Mrs. James O. Boisi 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Bond 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph O. Bonin 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Bouchoux 

Mr. and Mrs. Fernano A. Boudreau 

Mr. Clifford Boutwell 

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Bowen 



Alfred W. Branca, M.D. 

Rosa and William H. Brand 

Mrs. Mary R. Brawn 

Daniel Breslin and Associates 

Mr. Gerard A. Brillon 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Brogan 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernie A. Bromka 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Brosky 

John R. Brunner 

Stephen P. Budassi 

Mr. and Mrs. Olin J. Calchera 

Mr. John J. Callahan 

Anthony P. Camarra 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Capalbo 

Salvatore E. Carbone 

Douglas Carnival 

W. C. Carney 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Caron 

Mrs. Ann C. Casey 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Casey 

Alfred S. Cavaretta 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Chase 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel T. Church 

Dr. and Mrs. John R. Cicchetti 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cigas 

Mrs. Richard A. Clemens 

Robert L. Clifford 

Al Coakley 

Salvador Colom 

John Conley 

Frank Connell 

Mr. and Mrs. Grafton J. Corbett, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Corrigan 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Couto 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Coyne 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Croce 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene A. Cronin 

Thomas J. Cudmore 

Leo Darr 

Mr. and Mrs. William W. Davison 

Mr. and Mrs. Ignatius DeCicco 

Charles F. Decker, S.M. 

C. J. Delaney 

George V. Dennison 

John S. Denworth 

Arthur Desharnais 

Francis E. DeSilva 

Thomas E. Desmond 

Arthur E. Desrosiers 

Phyllis Diamond 



Mrs. Joseph R. DiMeo 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph DiMezza 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. DiMuzio 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. DiPerna 

Hugh F. Doherty 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Dolan 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Donovan 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth T. Doran 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Dorff 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M. Driscoll 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Driscoll 

Francis Drohan 

D. J. Duane 

John Dunbar 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Durkin 

Mrs. Arthur D. Duvall 

Mr. and Mrs. Roderick J. Dwyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Eagan 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Egan 

Mrs. Christian H. Eidt 

Carl Joseph Eisert 

Mr. John Elenewski 

Howard Embler 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry V. Esposito 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Fackelman 

Mrs. Rena Faraci 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Ferraro 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Fiore 

William Fisher 

Mrs. Jane C. Fletcher 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Ford 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Fornal 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Forrest 

Nicholas A. Forsyte 

Mr. Harry C. Forsyth 

Mr. and Mrs. August R. Funke 

Mrs. Mary R. Galotta 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Gangi 

Mr. and Mrs. Domenic F. Gattozzi 

Adolph and Pauline Gawlak 

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Genatt 

Mr. W. F. Giesen 

Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Giguere 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Gilarde 

Gately, Morgan, and Gilfoyle Insurance 

Dr. and Mrs. A. J. Gingras 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Glasheen 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Glennon 

Mr. and Mrs. Omer R. Godin 

Mrs. S. J. Gopin 



PATRONS 



Mr. and Mrs. John T. Gorman 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Gramling, Jr. 

Mr. Henry Q. Grant 

Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Green 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Griffin 

Mr. J. M. Guzman 

Mr. and Mrs. George Habian 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hacking 

Mr. HoUis Hall 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hallahan 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Halli, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Halton 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Hanke 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Hanley 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Hanna 

Manser Hapcook 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Harrington 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Hasselmann 

Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Hauck 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Hazlin 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Heffernan 

Robert V. Anderson, '40 

Joseph C. Higgins 

Mr. and Mrs. Christian Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Holland 

Albert Horman 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Home 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Hughes 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Iwanicki 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Jacquette 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Jordan 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Kabisaitis 

Mr. Francis Kaczmarek 

Col. and Mrs. John F. Kane 

Dr. and Mrs. Peter P. Karpawich 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Kearney 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Kehos 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Kelly 

Hon. Paul Kelly 

Robert A. Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Kervick 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Ketterer 

Mrs. Marion A. Kiley 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Kilmartin 

Mrs. John W. King 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. King 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Kinnally 

Michael Leo Kinsella 

Mr. and Mrs. I. J. Kloner 



William Korytowski 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Kroner 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Kuharich 

Mrs. Edwin R. Kulckak 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Kurylo 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon R. Kutz 

Mr. Raymond A. LaCourse 

Gerard A. Langlois 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Laver, Sr. 

Mr. Thomas F. Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Leen 

Mr. and Mrs. William P. Leetch 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Lentine 

Leonard Fuel Company 

Mr. Thomas D. Lewis 

Dr. and Mrs. Francis T. Linder 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon A. Lizdavinis 

Mr. Vincent A. Lopez 

Mr. and Mrs. Brunic Luboyeski 

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Lutz 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Lydon 

Dr. George W. Lynch 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Lynch 

Mrs. Walter J. Lyons 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald J. Lyons 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Lyons 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Lyons 

Mr. Joseph A. MacDonald 

Dr. and Mrs. Julian R. Macierowski 

James J. Macklin, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric C. Maclachlan 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Madden 

Mr. Leslie I. Madden, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald J. Magilligan 

Mr. Walter J. Mahoney 

Mr. Eugene F. Major 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Malone 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard C. Maloney 

Mr. Kenneth V. Malsch 

Mr. and Mrs. William Manzi 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald F. Markey 

Dr. and Mrs. Vincent Maroney 

Angel M. Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. Roman Martinez 

Mr. and Mrs. John Marysz 

Mr. and Mrs. Armand J. Massaro 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Matthews, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs.-^medeo J. Matteo 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. McCafferty, Sr, 

Edward H. McCall, D.D.S. 



Mr. James C. McCall 

Mr. Frank M. McCann 

Mr. Samuel L. McCormack 

Mr. Charles J. McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. McCorry 

Mr. Harold F. McDermott 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph J. McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. McDonnell 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. McFarland 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis X. McGinley 

Mr. and Mrs. James McGregor 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. McGuire, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William McKenna, Jr. 

Mr. Charles S. Mclaughlin 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. McLaughlin 

Mr. Hugh J. McMackin 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Carleton McMurtry 

Mr. Urban McNally 

Mr. R. M. McNamara 

Mr. John J. McN aught 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Meara 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph X. Meehan 

Mr. William M. Meehan 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. Melaragni 

Mr. Jose M. Menendez 

Mrs. Statia Michalaz 

Mr. and Mrs. James S. Millea 

Mr. Edwin L. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy F. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Minahan 

Mrs. Mollie S. Missan 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Molica 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Michael Montanari 

Mr. Philip F. Mooney, Jr. 

Edward J. and Emily Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Morgo 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Moriarty 

Mr. George F. Moriarty 

Mr. Matthew M. Moriarty 

Mr. Edward F. Morrissey 

Mr. George Moses 

Mr. Arnold L. Morton, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Mulcahy 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Mulcahy 

Mr. Ralph K. Mulford, Jr. 

Mr. Edward P. Mullen 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Murphy 

Joseph T. Murphy, M.D. 



PATRONS 



Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Murphy 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Murray 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Murray 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Nelpi 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Nelson 

Robert E. Neville 

Mrs. George E. Newbury 

Joseph Niedermaier 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Nolan 

Thomas E. Norton 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Novak 

Mrs. Charles F. Oberhauser 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. O'Brien '33 

Mr. William M. O'Brien 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph O'Dowd 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis X. O'Leary 

Mr. and Mrs. J. O'Malley 

Mrs. Adele E. Ordzie 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. O'Reilly 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruno A. Oskinis 

Col. and Mrs. Joseph F. Padlon 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Palmer 

Capt. and Mrs. George W. Parcels 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Parrillo 

Mr. and Mrs. Liberato Parrillo 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Patenaude 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander J. Patrick 

Charles Pattavina 

Guarino Pasquantonio 

Mr. and Mrs. Dominic L. Pepi 

Dr. and Mrs. Elmer L. Perron 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony J. Peters 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Phalen 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Pindar 

Pasquale Pitocco 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Porcari, Sr. 

Mrs. Harold W. Porter 

Mrs. Jean Lionel Pouliot 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Powell 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. A. Proal 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond L. Proulx 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert F. Provencher 

Harold A. Putnam 

Dr. and Mrs. L. J. Pyrtek 

Mr. Michael D. Quatrale 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael R. Quinn 

Mr. Norman F. X. Rahill 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony F. Rambler 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Randall 

Mr. John A. Rayll 



Mr. and Mrs. R. I. Reardon 

Mr. Frank Recupero 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Reimers 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert W. Reinhard 

Mr. Armand J. Riccardo 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Reihl 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent E. Rigler 

Mr. Stephen J. Riordan 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Ritacco 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Roche 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Rooney 

Mr. D. "V. Rosato 

Mr. Andrew J. Rogers 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rossi 

Mr. Jacob L. Rudd 

Captain William J. Rush, Jr., U.S.N. 

Mr. Fred W. Rusiecki 

Mr. and Mrs. Leland G. Ryan 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Ryan 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles X. Sampson 

Rugo Santini 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Santora 

Mr, and Mrs. Henry S. Saracusa 

Raymond M. Sarno, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson T. Sarrasin 

Mr. and Mrs. John Sattelmair 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Scalzo 

Kurt P. Schaffenberger 

Thomas B. Schmidt 

S. J. Schoenfeld 

Dr. and Mrs. George C. Schulte 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Schultheis 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis J. Scotto 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Shea 

Joseph Claude Shea 

Michael J. Shea 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Shea 

Dr. and Mrs. George A. Sirignano 

Mr. and Mrs. Elbridge H. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Smith 

Reginald E. Smith 

Dr. and Mrs. A. Shieska 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Snodgras 

Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Snyder 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Spenlmhaur 

Mrs. Josephine Sproule 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry N. Stamm 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Stearns 

Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Stefanick 

Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Stetz 



Mr. David Stevens 

Mr. Hilary Stevens 

Mrs. Aldora Stronach 

Mrs. J. Burke Sullivan 

Robert F. Sullivan 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Sullivan 

Mr, and Mrs. Elwyn M. Summ 

P. C. Symmons 

Arthur Tanger 

Mr, and Mrs. Frank E. Taylor 

Dr. Nicholas P. Teresi 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Tharp 

Francis J. Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Roy Thompson, Jr. 

Frederick C. Tilley 

Mr. and Mrs. Hermon L. Toof 

Andres Luis de Torres 

Mr. and Mrs, Peter Torrisi 

Mr. and Mrs. Byron G. Tosi 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Trudeau 

Mr, and Mrs. J. Edmund Trumbour 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Tulis 

Ricardo Vela, Jr. 

Francis A. Vitello 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew E. Vrabel 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick J. Waite 

Mr. James R. Wall, M.D. 

Mr. Edwin D. Walsh 

Dr. William L. Walsh 

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Ward 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Ward 

Mr. Ernest W. Warnke, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Warren 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Waurin 

Mr. Ronald J. Weafer 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl H. Weidling 

Mr. William Francis Welch 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley V. Wells 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Weschler 

Mr. Robert A. Westervelt 

Captain and Mrs. Herman L. White 

Mr. Joseph E. White 

Lillian J. Whiteway 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles E. Wiles 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome J. Yakel, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Zaikowski 

Gene J. Zaino, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodor Zizlsperger 



UNITED 



TOOL ANlQipUMRAL SUPPLY COMPANY., INC. 



BOSTON AREA 665-8458 




PHONES (AREA CODE 617) ^^^^JilMHBi 239 MARKET STREET 

LAWRENCE 683-954, g LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS 

LOWELL 452-7651 



01842 



■-JujnjJ /J. /'7L 



I a 7X Cla^cJ /m, 



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<n JiiLcr^ jjru (X.I I LjCrUAj J^JUL-hujuu jtnn cl j^cuTiztiMJ 



^uriCMVLUj UOixAJl) 



HOWLAND LINEN SUPPLY CO. 
INCORPORATED 

40 Bristol Street 

BOSTON 18, MASS. 

HAncock 6-6630 



73 Chancery Street 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

WYman 2-4981 



Comer Rt. No. 28 and Bearse's Way 

HYANNIS, MASS. 

spring 5-2245 




S.S. PIERCE 



Importers & Grocers 

Since 1831 
S. S. Pierce has become America's pacesetter 
for first quality food products and convenient 
service. At S. S. Pierce stores, you will find 
adventure and excitement — and a wide selection 
of unique foods and delicacies. 



TERRACE MOTEL 

75 AIR-CONDITIONED UNITS 

FREE TV AND PARKING 

FAMILY PLAN 

RECOMMENDED AAA - ALA 

MEMBER SUPERIOR MOTELS, INC. 

Convenient To Boston College 

1650 Commonwealth Avenue 

Brighton - Tel. 566-6260 



THE 

WARREN KAY VANTINE 

STUDIO, INC. 

OFFICIALLY SERVING 
THE 1966 



SUB TURRI 



TONY'S ITALIAN VILLA 

Route #9, Newton 

LA 7-2320 

Italian Veal Dishes 

Pasta 

Cacciatore 

Business Lunches 



TONY'S JUNIOR VILLA 
71 Union St., Newton Centre 

Frosty Ice Cream 

Hot Italian Subs 

Pizza 

Italian Dishes 



Best Wishes 



M. B. FOSTER ELECTRIC CO. 

368 CONGRESS ST. 

BOSTON 



Electrical Contractors 



NEW HAVEN 
CONNECTICUT 



PORTSMOUTH 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



COMPLIMENTS 



of 



PEPSI-COLA 



Compliments 



of the 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST'WI,. 
TO THE CLASS OF l^^*' 

from '^iP 

THE OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY-^EVIlOPMENT -^ 












V. . 






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I 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1966 

From 

the book store 
Mcelroy commons • boston college 
the bookstore is a true academic branch of any university 

Textbooks • Required and Recommended 
Paperbacks From All Publishers • Reference Books 
Sportswear • Jewelry • Stationery • Glassware 
Health and Beauty Aids • Prints of Famous Paintings 

Greeting Cards • Supplies 
Boston College Songs Recorded by the University Chorale 
Classical & Popular Records 

GIFT ITEMS FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS 



Campus Gift Tray 
Cigarette Music Box 
Desk Clock 
Scrap Books 
College Pets 



Ceramic Coffee & Tea Set 

(five pieces) 

Desk Sets 
Ash Trays 
Campus Pillow 
Song Books 



WELCOME 

CLASS OF 1966 

TO THE 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

ALUMNI HALL 
CHESTNUT HILL 
MASSACHUSETTS 



THE STUDENT SENATE 



of the 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



School of Education 



Extends Its Congratulations 



to the 1966 



GRADUATING CLASS 



of 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



lfHRER.™MADDIN 




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Reading at its best for the summer 

THE CREED OF A CATHOLIC 

Why Catholics can live unafraid in a world of violence 
and hatred, in any nation no matter what are the conditions, 
is explained in easy, understandable terms. Because of 
their Creed, in their minds are the Truths of God and in 
their hearts the realization of His love and care. This is 
the story of that Creed. 

by noted author Wilfred Hurley, CSP 
CATHOLIC DEVOTIONAL LIFE 

The why and wherefore of Catholic religious exercises are 
reviewed, explaining how they make life worth living— 
because they help us know God better and, incidentally, 
know ourselves better. 

2 intriguing books, each $2 paper $3 cloth 

WOMAN: HER INFLUENCE AND ZEAL As An 
Aid To The Priesthood 

by Very Rev. James Alberione, SSP, STD. 

"Father Alberione sets forth precisely what the Christian 

woman— regardless of her age or station— should be 

In the opinion of this reviewer. Father Alberione has pre- 
sented a superb study of the potentialities of the Christian 
woman, and with suggestions, that could, if they were 
really followed, change the whole face of a society which 
badly needs a facelifting." (The Priest) 

316 pages $3.50 cloth - $2.50 paper 
ARE AVAILABLE AT THE 
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YEARBOOKS 




SENIOR INDEX 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



ADAMS, DANIEL T. 

37 Waldo Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

267 



BENT, ANTHONY J. 

17 Liana Street, Woburn, Massachusetts 

268 



BURNETT, ROBERT E. 

16 Givens Ave., Wappingers Falls, N.Y. 

270, 286 



ALBERL ALBERT D. 

4401 South 36th St., Arlington, Virginia 

15, 139, 166, 267 

ALDRIDGE, MARTIN M. 

257 Wall Street, Meriden, Connecticut 
267 

AMATO, DENNIS J. 

36 Brookside Dr., Manhasset, L.I., N.Y. 
141, 245, 267 

ANDARY, JAMES F. 

1308 N. Quintana St., Arlington, Virginia 

267 

ANDERSON, BARRY 

22 Leroy Drive, Burlington, Massachusetts 

267 

ANDERSON, JOSEPH A. 

159 Warren Rd., Framingham, Massachusetts 

ANDERSON, STEPHEN 

37 Ardmore St., E. Braintree, Massachusetts 

ANSELLO, EDWARD F. 

625 Adams Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

125,266,267,269 

ARLINGHAUS, STEPHEN C 
22 Elm Street, Tenafly, New Jersey 
267 

ARNOLD, MICHAEL A. 

22 Murray Hill Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 

AUTH, JOSEPH A. 

260 Hopkins PI., Longmeadow, Mass. 

267 

BAILEY, P. KENT 

3100 Holly Street, Alexandria, Virginia 

267 

BAKER, JAMES F, 

84 Nichols Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 

BALLANTINE, JOHN J. 

42 Robinson St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 
267 

BARBIERI, RICHARD E. 

159-30 96th St., Howard Beach, New York 

141 



BERMUDEZ, JORGE, JR. 

2012 Italia Street, Santurce, Puerto Rico 

BERTSCH, GREGORY J. 

1799 Stanford Ave., Menlo Park, California 

268 

BIEN, LEON J. 

30 Fletcher St., Whitinsville, Massachusetts 

141, 148, 149, 235, 239, 268 

BILLINGS, GEORGE W. 

176 Roxbury Road, Stamford, Connecticut 

15, 153, 261,268 

BIRCH, DAVID A. 

310 North Day Street, Orange, New Jersey 
250, 268 

BLAUVELT, ALFRED R. 

184 Jefferson Ave., River Edge, New Jersey 
268 

BOLOGNINI, JOSEPH N. 

731 Park Avenue, Hoboken, New Jersey 

BOND, ROBERT J. 

184 Wren Street, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

l4l, 268 

BONIN, JOHN P. 

14 Pinedale Avenue, Methuen, Massachusetts 
141, 269 

BOWEN, ROBERT B. 

15 Macarthur Rd., North Haven, Conn. 
150, 269 

BOWERMAN, WENDELL J. 

28 Ashbrook Place, Moraga, California 

140, 141, 162, 269 

BOYLE, WILLIAM F. 

17 Garden Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

BRADY, JOHN D. 

1 54 Centre Street, N. Easton, Massachusetts 
15, 148, 238,269 

BRAND, CURTIS W. 

31-29 69th St., Jackson Heights, New York 

269 

BREEN, WILLIAM C 

4 St. Catherine Rd., Norwood, Massachusetts 

269 



BURWELL, RICHARD A. 

147 Cherry St., W. Newton, Massachusetts 

BUSCONI, RONALD G. 

16 California Park, Watertown, Mass. 

148, 270 

BUSH, JAMES W., JR. 

1712 Ruth Drive, Indianapolis, Indiana 

270 

CALCHERA, DAVID J. 

450 Woodstock Ave., Stratford, Connecticut 

148, 153, 164, 324, 326,343 

CAMPBELL, JOSEPH T. 

10 Harrison Street, Stoneham, Massachusetts 

270 

CANNON, THOMAS F., JR. 

9 Courtnay Circle, Pittsford, New York 

163, 270 

CAREY, WILLIAM S. 

21 Westwood Rd., Shrewsbury, Mass. 

238, 239, 270 

CARROLL, JAMES J. 

316 Franklin Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

270 

CARROLL, ROBERT J. 

207 Highland Ave., Winchester, Mass. 
270 

CARTER, FRANK T. 

41 Wilkins Street, Hamden, Connecticut 
270, 279, 305 

CARUSO, RICHARD F. 

325 Vermont St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

CASALETTO, JAMES J. 

23 Brooks Street, E. Boston, Massachusetts 

137, 141,270 

CASHMAN, JAMES D. 

71 Mall Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

271 

CASPER, MICHAEL V. 

187 Dorchester St., S. Boston, Mass. 

CHANEY, CHARLES 

201 Newburg Ave., Catonsville, Maryland 
251, 271 



BATSAVAGE, RICHARD E. 

304 Burnsford Ave., Bridgeport, Connecticut 

239, 267 



BURKE, GERARD J., JR. 

Old Bedford Road, Concord, Massachusetts 

269 



CIGAS, THOMAS J. 

5 Broc Terrace, Shelton, Connecticut 

271 



BAXTER, ROBERT A., JR. 

964 Washington Street, Bath, Maine 

361 

BENCH, LAWRENCE T. 

2 Upland Rd., W. Arlington, Massachusetts 

268 



BURKE, GREGORY P. 

16 Greenview Way, Upper Montclair, N.J. 

141, 269 

BURKE, THOMAS J., JR. 

45 Berlin Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 

270 



CLAFFEY, THOMAS F. 

19 Morgan Circle, Wethersfield, Connecticut 

141, 271 

COAKLEY, ROBERT J. 

l6l Foster St., Brighton, Massachusetts 
271 



COCOZZA, JOSEPH J. 

175 Elm Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

271 



COSTELLO, MICHAEL 

192 Boylston St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

273 



DELLO RUSSO, NICHOLAS M. 
3 Lewis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

275 



COFFEY, FRANCIS R. 

59 Goodenough St., Brighton, Massachusetts 

271 



COSTELLO, ROBERT V. 

1132 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 
273 



DENUCCI, JOSEPH D. 

861 Main Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

275 



COLL, JOHN T. 

92 Pomeroy Road, Madison, New Jersey 
134, 141, 271 

COLLINS, GERALD J. 

19 Leslie Avenue, Troy, New York 

130, 238, 272 

COLLINS, HUGH M. 

9 Egret Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 

COLLINS, WILLIAM J. 

79 Centre Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 

CONGO, CHARLES W. 

524 E. Brewster St., Appleton, Wisconsin 
272 

CONNERY, WILLIAM J. 

22 Lawton Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 

272 

CONNOR, JOHN J. 

243 Hancock St., S. Braintree, Massachusetts 

272 

CONNORS, JOSEPH J. 

1010 Bergen Blvd., Palisade, New Jersey 

140, 141, 272 

CONNORS, RICHARD M. 

84 Martin Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

CONRY, JAMES M. 

87 Harvard Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

272 

CONSILVIO, FELIX J. 

493 Main Street, Medford, Massachusetts 
148, 272 

CONSTANTINE, DAVID G. 

81 Church Street, Marlboro, Massachusetts 

272 

CONWAY, EDWARD C. 

79 Walworth St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

273 

COOGAN, EDMOND G. 

120 Westchester Rd., Boston, Massachusetts 

273 

COOGAN, JAMES J. 

Main Street, Brewster, Massachusetts 

273 



COTTER, WILLIAM H., JR. 

114 Lancaster Rd., W. Hartford, Conn. 

274 

COUGHLAN, PAUL J. 

1 307 Nelson Avenue, New York, New York 

15, 238,239, 274 

COUSINEAU, THOMAS J. 

107 Prospect Hill St., Newport, R.I. 

CREEDEN, ROBERT A. 

4 Kimball Road, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

274, 359 

CRONIN, DANIEL I. 

54 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

274 

CRONIN, JOHN M. 

100 Winslow Ave., Norwood, Massachusetts 

CRONIN, FRANCIS A. 

39 Summer Street, Braintree, Massachusetts 
274, 298, 299, 324 

CROWLEY, DAVID M. 

42 Mount Vernon St., Charlestown, Mass. 

141, 274 

CURRY, JAMES E. 

16 Hopedale Street, Alston, Massachusetts 

DAIGLE, RONALD A. 

29 Elm Street, Fort Kent, Maine 

275 

DAILEADER, PHILIP H. 

60 Hudson Road, Bellerose, New York 

275 

DALEY, KEVIN J. 

40 Playstead Road, Newton, Massachusetts 
148 

DALTON, EDWARD P. 

12 Chestnut Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 

130, 141, 164, 166, 275 

DALTON, THOMAS J. F. 

1 5 Summer Street, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

D'AMBRUOSO, DOM S. 

30 Glen Hallow, W. Hartford, Connecticut 
130, 275 



DERBY, JOHN H. 

237 Appleton St., Arlington, Massachusetts 
90, 238, 239, 275 

DESHARNAIS, JAMES E. 

237 Walden St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

275 

DEVENY, JAMES K. 

38 Percival Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

275 

DEVYLDER, JOSEPH J. 

298 French St., Watertown, Connecticut 
276 

DILLMUTH, JOHN W. 

173 Sunset Avenue, Meriden, Connecticut 

276 

DION, DAVID R. 

24 Tremont Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

DOCHERTY, JOHN P. 

74-40 62nd Street, Brooklyn, New York 

141, 276 

DOHERTY, JOHN C. 

44 Irving Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
141, 148, 276 

DOHERTY, MICHAEL R. 

3 Meadowbank Ave., Mattapan, Mass. 
276 

DOLAN, EDWARD J. 

10 Drayton Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

276 

DOLAN, JAMES B., JR. 

23 Bushnell St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

276 

DOLAN, WILLIAM S. 

27 Woodlawn St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



DOUCETTE, JOHN F. 

24 Lawrence St., Boston, Massachusetts 

276 

DOWNES, EDWARD R. 

9 Mallard Street, Yarmouth, Massachusetts 

141,236 



COOK, GERALD J. 

56 Union Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 

273, 284 

COSKREN, RICHARD 

113 Berkeley Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

273 

COSTA, DAVID E. 

9 Maynard Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

273 



DAVIS, WILLIAM G. 

2444 76th Ave., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

275 

DAVISON, WILLIAM R. 

146 Hutton Street, Jersey City, New Jersey 

155,275, 329 

DEBASSIO, ALLAN J. 

134 Stoughton St., Stoughton, Massachusetts 

275 



DOYLE, JOHN J. 

Carven Road, Milford, Massachusetts 

276 

DRISCOLL, JOSEPH R. 

67 Thetford Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

277 

DUFFY, EDWARD L. 

35 Granite Place, Milton, Massachusetts 

277 



DUHAIME, WALTER B. 

R.F.D. 1, Box 37s C, Manchester, N.H. 

277 

DUNCAN, LAWRENCE H. 

5 Evergolln Ave., Somerville, Massachusetts 

DURKIN, ANDREW R. 

Shelter Rock Road, Danbury, Connecticut 

277 

DUSEAU, JOSEPH O. 

54 Kenwood St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

277 

DWYER, RODERICK T. 

179 Lanier Place, Westbury, New York 

139, 141, 277 

FALCO, RICHARD J. 

187 Jewett Ave., Bridgeport, Connecticut 
238, 277 

FALLON, WILLIAM J. 

46 Glen Road, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

277 

FARRELL, EDMOND J. 

82 Dustin Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

148, 277 

FARRICKER, RICHARD J. 

Rock Ridge Avenue, Greenwich, Connecticut 

277 



FEELY, FREDERICK G. 

70 Tuttle Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

FEENEY, LAWRENCE J. 

52 Boutwell Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

278 

FERNANDEZ, ROBERT V. 

44 Robeson St., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

278 



FERRANCE, ARTHUR A. 

22 Hunter Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

278 

FINN, RICHARD P. 

220 Cottage Street, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

278 

FIORE, JOHN W. 

44 Merchant St., N. Providence, R.I. 

12, 208, 213, 215, 278 

FITZGERALD, JOHN F. 

68 Marymount Rd., Quincy, Massachusetts 

278 

FITZGERALD, RICHARD H. 

62 G Street, S. Boston, Massachusetts 

278 

FLANNERY, OWEN J. 

24 Wadsworth Ave., Winthrop, Mass. 

278, 329 

FLEMING, BERNARD S., JR. 

9 Doran Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

141, 279 



FLYNN, EDWARD C. 

202 Edge Hill Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

279, 282 

FOLAN, THOMAS 

24 Adams Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 
148, 279 

FORD, THOMAS J. 

37 Chase St., Newton Centre, Massachusetts 
279 

FORDE, JOHN J. 

31 Hunnewell Ave., Brighton, Massachusetts 

279 

FORREST, MARTIN J. 

173 Beech Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 

279 

FREED, EDWARD J. 

140 Vista Drive, East Haven, Connecticut 

279 

FUCILLO, CARMEN R. 

156 Weld Street, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

l4l, 279 

GABORIAULT, LOUIS C. 

9 Summer Street, Attleboro, Massachusetts 

280, 355 



GAIN, DAVID C 

137 N. Quincy St., Brockton, Massachusetts 

GALLIGAN, THOMAS J. 

1806 Beacon Street, Waban, Massachusetts 

280 

GAUDETTE, RONALD A. 

125 Willard Circle, Islington, Massachusetts 

280 

GAVIN, EDWARD F. 

344 Union Street, Millis, Massachusetts 

280 

GEARY, ROBERT F. 

47 Tower Street, Forest Hills, Massachusetts 
280 

GENNACO, VINCENT J. 

12 Eaton Street, Revere, Massachusetts 



GERRIOR, RICHARD J. 

64 Charles Street, Reading, Massachusetts 

280 

GIBLIN, DENNIS 

221 Hopkins Road, Baltimore, Maryland 

141 

GIBSON, LAURENCE W., JR. 

6 Hawthorne Pk., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

280 

GIGLIOTTI, MICHAEL F. X. 

28 Ridge Crest Drive, Chesterfield, Missouri 

281 

GILARDE, THOMAS J. 

24 Lyne Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

281 



GILMORE, THOMAS E. 

150 Tyndale St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

281 

GIUSIANA, ALDO J. 

115 Dorchester Road, Rochester, New York 

141 

GLENNON, ROBERT J., JR. 

110 Standish Rd., Watertown, Massachusetts 

281 



GOGER, THOMAS J. 

615 Locust Street, Roselle, New Jersey 

281 

GOODRICH, JULIAN R. 

5 Marvin Street, Montpelier, Vermont 

281 



GOOKIN, VINCENT L. 

416 Spring Street, Marshfield, Massachusetts 

GORMAN, JOHN T. 

36l4 TuUamore Rd., University Hghts., Ohio 

281 

GRAMLING, PAUL J. 

7504 Maple Terrace, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 

l4l, 281 

GRAVEL, WARD F. 

65 Center Street, Adams, Massachusetts 

282 

GREEN, ERNEST A. 

24 Dix Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

282 

GREEN, JOSEPH E. 

30 Amsden Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
282 

GREENE, THOMAS J. 

4l W. Walnut Rd., Roxbury, Massachusetts 

282 

GROSS, RICHARD K. 

172 Thurston St., Wrentham, Massachusetts 

282 

GUAY, JOHN W. 

2 Greenway Circle, Glens Falls, New York 

342 

GUNNIP, ROBERT 

529 Rothbury Road, Wilmington, Delaware 

148, 234, 306 

GUSTAFERRO, JAMES E. 

2 Leonard Circle, Medford, Massachusetts 

282 

HAJDA, LUBOMYR ANDRIJ 

16 Glade Ave., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

141, 282 

HANLEY, THOMAS F. 

15 Rosselerin Rd., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

282 

HANNOLD, HOWARD R. 

201 Ellis Road, Havertown, Pennsylvania 



HANSON, CHARLES H. 

54 Samoset Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 

282 



HUARD, PAUL R. 

219 Mammoth Rd., Manchester, N.H. 



KENEALLY, FRANCIS J. 

64 Plandome Court, Manhasset, New York 

286 



HARRIES, RICHARD J., JR. 

86 Davis Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 

HARRINGTON, DAVID S. 

1 1 Elmdale Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

HAUSER, JOHN R. 

231 Guthrie Avenue, Alexandria, Virginia 

250,262, 282 

HAYDEN, JOSEPH A. 

283 Richmond Ave., S. Orange, New Jersey 

104, 283 

HAYES, LAURENCE F., JR. 

281 Park Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

283 

HEALY, THOMAS A. 

404 Lake View Park, Rochester, New York 

283 

HEFFERNAN, CHARLES J. 

20 Haven Esplanade, Staten Island, N.Y. 

125,256, 266,283 

HERATY, JOHN E. 

27 Lyon Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
283 

HERMANN, JOHN A. 

216 Bellevue St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

148 

HESLIN, DAVID J. 

4 Muriel Avenue, Wakefield, Massachusetts 

283 

HIGGINS, JOHN J. 

15 Adanac Ter., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

150,283 

HINES, EDWARD F., JR. 

15 Lakeview Ter., Woburn, Massachusetts 
283 

HINSON, ROBERT W. 

514 Corlies Ave., Allenhurst, New Jersey 

160, 283 

HODGMAN, JOHN F. 

71 Frankfort St., Fitchburg, Massachusetts 
250, 283, 340 

HOFFMAN, CHRISTIAN M. 

3900 Greystone Ave., Bronx, New York 

164, 166, 284 

HOGAN, JOHN R. 

28 Berkeley Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
284 

HOGAN, PAUL F. 

72 High Street, Exeter, New Hampshire 
284 

HOULE, DENNIS R. 

8 Beech Circle, Andover, Massachusetts 

284 



HUBBARD, FRANCIS J. 

161 Senator Street, Brooklyn, New York 

155 

HUNT, JOHN E. 

10 Walters Road, Norwood, Massachusetts 

JAEGER, RICHARD M. 

9265 Shore Road, Brooklyn, New York 

JALKUT, RICHARD A. 

33 Himoor Circle, Randolph, Massachusetts 
284 

JOHNSON, CARLETON D. 

84 Herman Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

284 

JONES, REGINALD H. 

5 Jones Ave., W. Lebanon, New Hampshire 
148, 284 

JULIAN, JOHN J. 

121 Hartford Ter., Springfield, Massachusetts 

KANE, GEOFFREY P. 

381 Willow Street, Mansfield, Massachusetts 

141, 285 

KEANE, WILLIAM M. 

137 Ashcroft Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

141, 285 

KEENE, KEVIN P. 

126 Park Avenue, Cranston, Rhode Island 

148, 234, 285 

KEHOE, JAMES E. 

90 Whitman Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 

285 

KEITH, ROGER WILLIAM 

442 Lynnfield Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

285 

KELIHER, ALAN E. 

5 Shawnlee Road, Canton, Massachusetts 

285 

KELLER, THOMAS J. 

870 South Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

156,285 

KELLEY, GERALD K. 

158 Foster Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

285 

KELLEY, JOSEPH T. 

34 Prince Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
141, 285 

KELLEY, THOMAS E. 

5841 Tyndall Avenue, Bronx, New York 

281, 285 

KELMON, RALPH M. 

156 Middlesex Ave., Wilmington, Mass. 

286 



KENIRY, DAVID I. 

49 Farwell Street, Natick, Massachusetts 

KENNEALEY, GERARD T. 

9 Mission Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

141, 286 

KENNY, PATRICK J. 

27 Upton Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 



KENNY, PETER J. 

673 Deming Street, Wapping, Connecticut 

142, 286 

KEOUGH, JAMES E. 

49 Academy St., Manchester, Connecticut 

KILLELEA, JOHN R. 

56 Scotch Pond Place, Quincy, Massachusetts 

286 

KILLGOAR, JOHN R. 

33 Radford Lane, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

286 

KILLILEA, KEVIN M. 

59 Winthrop Drive, Riverside, Connecticut 

287 

KING, JOSEPH A. 

94 Union Street, Bristol, Rhode Island 

148, 287 

KING, JOSEPH D. 

98 F Street, S. Boston, Massachusetts 

KINSELLA, MICHAEL L. 

7 Belmont Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 

287 

KIRK, EDWARD W. 

180 Franklin Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

287, 369 

KORYTOWSKI, JOHN T. 

24l4 E. Cumberland St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

287 

KOSTIZAK, WILLIAM J., JR. 

225 Newcastle Road, Rochester, New York 
141, 142 

KOURTZ, PAUL B. 

24 Elm Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 
282 

KOWALSKI, CARL F. 

42 Talbot Road, Braintree, Massachusetts 
141, 287 

KRAMER, DONALD L. 

25 Brightside Dr., Stamford, Connecticut 

14I, 287 

KROPP, DAVID R. 

1903 Hyde Park Ave., Readville, Mass. 



HOYT, PHILIP A. 

246 Winfield Road, Rochester, New York 

284 



KENDELLEN, GARY T. 

114-12 197th St., St. Albans, L.I., N.Y. 

286 



KURYLO, MICHAEL J. 

675 N. Elm St., Wallingford, Connecticut 
l4l, 288 



LaBRECQUE, ROBERT E. 

132 Columbia Blvd., Waterbury, Connecticut 
288 

LaCROIX, ANDREW V. 

155 Tyler Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

288 

LAHAN, P. MICHAEL 

44 Currier Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

153, 166, 288 

LALLAMANT, ROBERT J. 

1595 Kensington Cir., Los Altos, California 

162 

LALLY, WILLIAM F. 

82 Otis Street, Newtonville, Massachusetts 

148, 288 

LAMOND, WILLIAM F. 

564 Cummins Hway., Mattapan, Mass. 

289 

LANDRY, RAYMOND A. 

30 Torrey Street, Portland, Maine 

289 

LANGLOIS, PAUL W. 

90 Hillman St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 

142, 289 

LANGONE, JOHN J. 

i486 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 

289 

LAWLOR, JAMES D. 

201 Beach Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

289 

LEE, FRANCIS GRAHAM 

44 Quint Avenue, Allston, Massachusetts 

141,289 

LELIEUVRE, ROBERT 

376 River Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

15, 125, 266, 269, 289, 359 

LENNERTZ, JAMES E. 

4205 Homerlee Avenue, E. Chicago, Indiana 

125, 141, 266, 289, 321 

LESKOSKY, RICHARD J. 

1323 Winstanley Ave. E., St. Louis, 111. 

LESPERANCE, PAUL F. 

32 Barbara Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

289 

LEVIS, SAMUEL J., JR. 

181 S. Pleasant St., Haverhill, Massachusetts 

289, 302 

LEWIN, RICHARD H. 

23 Whitson St., Forest Hills, New York 

289 

LEWIS, ADAM J., JR. 

8906 Jasper Lane, Baltimore, Maryland 

141, 148, 289 

LINEHAN, DANIEL M. 

640 Hale St., Prides Crossing, Massachusetts 

290 



LOBAN, MICHAEL L. 

214 Davenport St., Bridgeport, Connecticut 
150,290 

LOUGHLIN, JOHN J. 

76 Crescent Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

290 

LUTZ, THOMAS G. 

1070 Brierwood Blvd., Schenectady, N.Y. 

290 

LYNCH, JOHN M. 

80 St. Brendan Rd., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

MacCORMACK, ROBERT D. 

30 Randolph Street, Canton, Massachusetts 

MACKIN, GERARD F., JR. 

1744 Columbia Rd., S. Boston, Massachusetts 

MacMASTER, ANGUS M. 

24 Sycamore Lane, Hingham, Massachusetts 

290 

MADDEN, DANIEL R. 

6 Bradley Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

141 

MADDEN, MICHAEL F. 

643 Orange Center Rd., Orange, Connecticut 

290 

MAFFEI, JAMES M. 

197 Thacher Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

290 

MAGDALENSKI, LAWRENCE S. 
Prospect St., Box 405, Housatonic, Mass. 
290, 329 

MAGILLIGAN, JOHN F. 

540 Third Street, Brooklyn, New York 

166, 236, 359, 272, 291, 336 

MAHONEY, JOHN J. 

73 Holyoke Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

291 

MAHONEY, JOSEPH W. 

99 Plain Street, Stoughton, Massachusetts 

MALLOY, ROBERT J. 

107 N Street, S. Boston, Massachusetts 
291 

MALONEY, MARTIN D. 

2517 Crest Street, Alexandria, Virginia 

95, 141,291 

MALONEY, TERENCE 

18 James Street, N. Attleboro, Massachusetts 

MANCINI, JOSEPH C 

26 Harwood Lane, E. Rochester, New York 

141, 268, 291 

MANISTER, DREW M. 

18 Tenby Drive, Wilmington, Delaware 

291 

MANNING, EDWARD B. 

244 Highland Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

276, 291 



MANNING, FRANK E., JR. 

3 Oak Tree Road, Dedham, Massachusetts 

141, 159, 291 

MANNING, MICHAEL J. 

35 Loyed Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 

MANTOS, JOHN J. 

124 Anawan Ave., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

141,291 

MARKEL, FRED B. 

37 Bellevue Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 

MARREC, ANTHONY F. 

1 1 Overlook Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

292 

MARSHALL, PAUL C. 

R.D. 2, Box 180, Pottstown, Pennsylvania 

148, 165, 292, 296 

MARZETTI, LAWRENCE A. 
5932 25th Ave. SE, Washington, D.C. 
292 

MASSARO, WILLIAM J. 

17 Crown Street, Bristol, Connecticut 

292,325 

MASTERSON, PAUL F. 

234 Clark Avenue, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

292 

MAYNARD, JOHN F. 

146 Maynard St., Springfield, Massachusetts 

148, 292 

McCarthy, charles j. jr. 

20 Howell Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
292 

McCarthy, daniel g. 

23 Ruskin St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

McCarthy, dennis m. 

3945 Bluestone Rd., Cleveland Hghts., Ohio 
140, 141, 292 

McCarthy, eugene m. 

37 Arlington Dr., Battle Creek, Michigan 
292 

McCarthy, james t. 

11 Hardwick Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
165, 292 

McCarthy, richard 

106 Huntington Rd., Garden City, L.I., N.Y. 
140, 253, 292 

McCREESH, DAVID P. 

187 Mercier Avenue, Bristol, Connecticut 

148, 153, 293 

McDERMOTT, THOMAS F. 
East Street, Litchfield, Connecticut 
293 

McDEVITT, JAMES F. 

25 St. Mark Rd., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

293 

McDonald, brian p. 

279 Walton Street, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 
130, 148, 293 



McDonald, james l. 

10 Oak Street, Danvers, Massachusetts 
293 

Mcdonald, william j. 

25 Thompson St., Araesbury, Massachusetts 
130,272, 293 

Mcelroy, Joseph e. 

65 Caldwell St., N. Weymouth, Mass. 
293 

McFARLAND, BRIAN E. 

135 Theodore Parker Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 
293 

McGEE, RICHARD J. 

136 Beardsworth Rd., Tiverton, R.I. 
294 

McGRATH, ROGER H. 

110 Lawrence PI., New Rochelle, New York 

294 

Mclaughlin, james w. 

6956 Bradley Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 
294 

McLean, Robert t. 

62 Calvary Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

McNAMARA, JOHN F. 

530 Ridge Road, Hamden, Connecticut 

McNEIL, THOMAS P. 

351 Cornell Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

294 

MEGLEY, DAVID J. 

32 Wells Ave., Croton-Hudson, New York 

MEEHAN, GREGORY A. 

14 Fernald Ter., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

METZLER, WILLIAM R. 

486 Jarvis Street, Cheshire, Connecticut 
294 

MILLEA, JAMES S. 

1807 Ninth Street, Rensselaer, New York 

281, 294 

MILLER, STEPHEN M. 

13 Everett Road, Salem, Massachusetts 

130, 294 

MINAHAN, DANIEL J. 

15 Mt. Bowdoin Ter., Dorchester, Mass. 
294 

MISS AN, ARTHUR I. 

12 Robin Road, Hartford, Connecticut 

295 



MITCHELL, MARK L. Ill 

1724 E. McMillan Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 



MONIZ, ERNEST J. 

195 Diman Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

140, 141, 155,295 

MONTANARI, ROBERT M. 

30 Atlantic Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts 

295 

MORAVITZ, RONALD S. 

45 Villanova Lane, Huntington, New York 

MORELLI, JOSEPH M. 

24 Dale Street, Revere, Massachusetts 

148, 295 

MORGO, JAMES M. 

16 Fyrbeck Ave., Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 

238, 295 

MORLEY, PAUL B. 

272 Dana Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 

295 

MULCAHY, RICHARD E., JR. 

86 Mendon Street, Uxbridge, Massachusetts 
295 

MULFORD, RALPH K. Ill 

4 Retrop Road, Natick, Massachusetts 
148, 149, 288, 295 

MURPHY, THOMAS M., JR. 

205 Ledyard St., New London, Connecticut 

295 

MUTH, JEFFREY B. 

5 Ellsworth Ave., Morristown, New Jersey 
295 

NAPOLI, JAMES J. 

12 Currier Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

295 

NEVILLE, THOMAS M. 

12 Hammond Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

296 

NIXON, JOHN P. 

166 Medford St., Arlington, Massachusetts 

296 

NOLAN, DENNIS M. 

19 Indian Hill Rd., Arlington, Massachusetts 

296 

NOLAN, FRANCIS X. 

35 Park Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

296 

NORBERG, RICHARD D. 

4. Blossom Hill Rd., Winchester, Mass. 

296 

NORTON, ARTHUR J. 

160 High Street, Reading, Massachusetts 

O'BRIEN, GEORGE J. 

8 Mill Lane, E. Braintree, Massachusetts 



O'CONNOR, EDWARD L. 

122 A Washington St., Maiden, Mass. 

O'CONNOR, JAMES F. 

346 Buna Road, Fort Lee, Virginia 

297 

O'CONNOR, JAMES M. 

27 Royal Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

238, 239 

O'CONNOR, THOMAS P. 

346 Temple St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

297 

OJINNAKA, PETER S. I. 
Umuaka Pa, Orlu, Nigeria 
222, 297 

OLEARY, TIMOTHY F. 

241 Elliot Street, Newton, Massachusetts 
297 

OLOSKEY, EDWARD F. 

78 Antwerp Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
297 

O'NEILL, WILLIAM J., JR. 

27 Colonial Drive, Arlington, Massachusetts 

O'REILLY, EDWARD J. 

840 Grand Concourse, New York 

15, 130, 238, 297, 321, 324, 350 

PADOS, FRANK J., JR. 

1100 Central Avenue, Alpha, New Jersey 

134, 159,272,297 

PALMACCIO, RICHARD J. 

789 Commonw'lth Ave., Newton Ctr., Mass. 

297 

PAQUIN, ROGER O. 

186 Lincoln St., Winthrop, Massachusetts 

297 

PATTENGALE, PAUL K. 

9 Brightside PI., Webster Grove, Missouri 

141, 297 

PAXTON, JOHN P. 

567 Olympia Ave., Cliffside Park, N.J. 
238, 250, 298, 361 

PEPI, LOUIS R. 

25 Russell Rd., Framingham Center, Mass. 

298 

PERI, FRANCIS W. 

33 Charles St., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

298 

PERKINS, GEORGE M. 

60 Berwick Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 

298 

PERREAULT, DONALD J. 

79 Camp Street, New Britain, Connecticut 
298 



MOLLOY, JOHN J. 

85 Brook Farm Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

295 



O'BRIEN, PAUL F. 

30 North Avenue, Weston, Massachusetts 

297 



PERREAULT, JAY S. 

835 Mammoth Road, Dracut, Massachusetts 

298 



MONACO, MICHAEL P. 

85-52 213th St., Queens Village, New York 

148, 295 



O'BRIEN, PAUL F. X. 

215 Corey St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

15, 146,297 



PETRILLO, LOUIS J. 

40 Pardee Place, New Haven, Connecticut 

298 



PHIPPS, JOSEPH K. 

48 Maple Square, Franklin, New Hampshire 
298 

PORCARO, EUGENE J. 

2897 Dudley Avenue, New York, New York 

141, 284, 299 



ROCHE, FRANCIS J. 

21 Main Street, Merrimac, Massachusetts 
300 

ROONEY, WILLIAM J., JR. 

63 Cabot Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

300 



SICILIANO, MICHAEL A. 

61 Pelham St., Newton Center, Massachusetts 

302 

SIKORA, FRANK A. 

74 Clement Ave., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

302 



PORPER, RUSSELL D. 

6 Poplar Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

299 



ROMAN, WILLIAM S. 

98 Meadowland Street, Delmar, New York 

300 



SILK, JOHN W. 

71 Fernwood Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 



PORTER, JOHN H. 

220 Overland Drive, Stratford, Connecticut 

299 

QUINN, MICHAEL F. 

198 Lynnfield St., Peabody, Massachusetts 

299 

RAFFAELE, JOSEPH A. 

86 Pleasant View St., Roslindale, Mass. 

299 

RAFFERTY, EDWARD J. 

42 Forest Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 
299 

RAMBLER, WILLIAM A. 

14 Ryan Street, Danvers, Massachusetts 

299 

REARDON, EDWARD J. 

647 Main Street, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 
141, 252, 299 

REILLY, STEPHEN E. 

13160 Lee Court, Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

15, 300 

REYNOLDS, JOHN F. 

31 Claremont Ave., Holyoke, Massachusetts 

300 

REYNOLDS, JOHN P. 

28 Paulina Street, SomerviUe, Massachusetts 

300 

REYNOLDS, ROBERT F. 

6 Wildwood Rd., Medford, Massachusetts 

300 



ROY, MICHAEL A. 

39 Bond Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

130, 301 

RUSSELL, ARCH J. 

910 Vicar Lane, Alexandria, Virginia 

146 

RUSSELL, ROBERT J. 

20 Aukland Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

301 

RUTKOWSKI, HENRY J. 

385 Knowlton Street, Stratford, Connecticut 

RYAN, ROBERT F. 

34 Sixth Street, Providence, Rhode Island 

301 

SABINI, FREDERICK D. 

1560 Metropolitan Ave., New York, N.Y. 

278,301,359 

SANTERRE, RICHARD R. 

83 Pawtucket Drive, Lowell, Massachusetts 

301 

SANTOPIETRO, RALPH A. 

67 Francis Street, Waterbury, Connecticut 

130,301 

SCHAFFNER, GEOFFREY J. 

400 Mt. Wayne Ave., Framingham, Mass. 

SCHLIFF, HENRY M. 

89 N. Elm Street, Schenectady, New York 
301 

SCLAFANI, LUCIAN J. 

75 Long Hill Drive, Stamford, Connecticut 

301 



SOCHACKI, DAVID M. 

535 Westfield Ave., Bridgeport, Connecticut 

303 

SORIANO, ANDREW B. 

406 William St., SomerviUe, New Jersey 

89, 148, 303 

SPADA, SALVATORE 

21 Dorchester Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

SPICER, DENZIL D. 

6601 Karlson Ct., W. Hyattsville, Maryland 

303 

SPINELLI, FRANCIS J. 

95 Fox Hill Road, Nahant, Massachusetts 

303 

STANKUNAS, ALEXANDER R. 

65 Lincoln Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

303 

STATT, CYRIL J. 

500 W. Wagon Wheel Dr., Phoenix, Ariz. 

14l,^273, 303 

STEADMAN, HENRY J. 

37 Woodland Rd., Wakefield, Massachusetts 

166, 303, 362 

ST. GEORGES, GEORGE W. 

7 Victoria Lane, S. Hadley Falls, Mass. 

303 

ST. JOHN, ROBERT L. 

Victory Highway, Coventry, Rhode Island 

132, 148, 304 



RICCI, LAWRENCE E. 

62 Woodville Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

300 



SCOFIELD, LAWRENCE F. 

131 Linden Avenue, Maiden, Massachusetts 

302 



STONE, JOSEPH L., JR. 

233 Little Falls Rd., Cedar Grove, N.J. 

304 



RICE, DAVID G. 

20 Bonner Avenue, SomerviUe, Massachusetts 

141 



SHANAHAN, ALLAN R. 

57 Garland Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

302 



STONE, R. TIMOTHY 

6081 Arlington Blvd., Falls Church, Va. 

304 



RICK, JAMES H. 

10 Wildrose Lane, Levittown, Pennsylvania 

300 



SHATTUCK, THEODORE G. 

1566 Barnum Ave., Bridgeport, Connecticut 

302 



STORLAZZI, EDMUND G. 

81 Old Mystic St., Arlington, Massachusetts 

304 



RICKLEFS, DONALD P. 

27 Verdun Ave., Portsmouth, N.H. 

141, 148, 300 



SHEA, WILLIAM M. 

17 Winsor Ave., Watertown, Massachusetts 

302 



SUGNET, CHARLES J. 

1720 Amherst Street, Buffalo, New York 

304 



RITACCO, JAMES E. 

343 Willett Ave., Port Chester, New York 

153,300 

ROCHE, DAVID M. 

Rocky Brooks Farm, S. Newbury, N.H. 

141, 300 



SHEEHAN, ROBERT C 

212 West Shore Dr., Massapequa, L.I., N.Y. 

250, 302 

SHELDON, PAUL G. 

dS) Blanchard Blvd., Braintree, Massachusetts 

302 



SULLIVAN, GEORGE P. 

93 South Cliff Street, Ansonia, Connecticut 

304 

SULLIVAN, ROBERT J. 

311 W. 24th St., Apt. 5F, New York, N.Y. 

146, 163, 304 



SULLIVAN, ROBERT S. 

35 Newell Rd., Auburndale, Massachusetts 

304 



SZYMANSKI, JOSEPH F. 

4 Cedar Place, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

304 

TAKACS, ROBERT P. 

13 Glendenning St., Norwalk, Connecticut 
304, 342, 359 

TEBBETTS, ALBERT F. 

297 Sumner Street, E. Boston, Massachusetts 

304 

TETER, JOHN M. 

3100 Cherry Creek Dr., Denver, Colorado 

250, 256, 261, 294, 304 

THOMPSON, JOHN R. 

5214 Portsmouth Rd., Washington, D.C. 

305 

THOMPSON, JOSEPH F. 

15 Southmere Rd., Mattapan, Massachusetts 

305 

THOMSON, LAURENCE E. 

60 Manthorne Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

148, 305 

TINKER, PETER M. 

22 Bemis Rd., Newtonville, Massachusetts 

305 

TORRISI, CARMINE R. 

1 Thorndike St., Lawrence, Massachusetts 

141, 148, 305 

TORRISI, THOMAS P. 

37 Houston Ave., Methuen, Massachusetts 

164, 305, 324, 372, 389 

TRUDEAU, RICHARD 

3 Page Court, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

141 

TSAKOS, PAUL R. 

62 71st Street, Brooklyn, New York 

TURNER, RICHARD C. 

14 Churchill Ter., Newtonville, Mass. 
305 

OURBAN, STANLEY T. 

60 Parker Avenue, Buffalo, New York 

305 

VAIL, CHARLES C. 

601 Mantauk Highway, Bay Shore, New York 

VERNIER, EDWARD M. 

1040 Thomas Avenue, Baldwin, New York 

306 

VRABEL, JOHN M. 

Ash Street, Webster, Massachusetts 

306 

WAGNER, ALBERT F. 

98 Washington Rd., Pittsford, New York 

140, 141, 154, 155, 306 



WAGNER, EDWARD R. 

5 Beach Street, Farmingdale, Ne* York 

306 

WALSH, E. DENIS 

882 Mayer Dr., Wantagh, Long Island, N.Y. 

306 

WALSH, THOMAS A. 

41 Perham St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

15, 306 

WALSH, THOMAS M. 

26 Aldworth St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

148, 149, 306 

WARD, EDMUND J. 

312 Rock Island Rd., Quincy, Massachusetts 

307 

WARNKE, WILLIAM J. 

26 S. Hillside Ave.. Elmsford, New York 

307 

WARREN, THOMAS L. 

5 Cedar Avenue, Arlington, Massachusetts 

148, 163, 307 

WAURIN, LAWRENCE W. 

19 Surrey Lane, Clifton, New Jersey 

167, 307 

WEIDLING, KEVIN H. 

225 Linden St., Massapequa Pk., New York 

124,271,307,336,367 

WEIG, SPENCER G. 

32-14 Parson's Blvd., Flushing, New York 

140, 141, 146, 307 

WELLS, THOMAS M. 

6672 32nd PI. N.W., Washington, D.C. 

164, 272, 307, 326, 359 

WENT, JOHN E. 

RED 1, New Milford, Connecticut 

165, 269, 307, 336, 359, 372 

WENTHE, JOHN F. 

269 Winfield Road, Rochester, New York 

WEST, RICHARD C 

32 Blecher Circle, Milton, Massachusetts 

WHEATLEY, WILLIAM O., JR. 

1670 Metropolitan Ave., Bronx, New York 

307 

WHELAN, DAVID W. 

212 Norfolk St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

307 

WOOD. JOHN M. 

229 Whaley Street, Freeport, New York 

282, 307 

WUNDERLICH, RUEDIGER O. 

4 Roxbury Avenue, Natick, Massachusetts 

YALMOKAS, JOSEPH A. 

13 Linley Terrace, S. Boston, Massachusetts 

ZAK, WLLLIAM F. 

2831 Burden Drive, Parma, Ohio 

141, 167, 250, 307 



COLLEGE OF 

BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 

ABBOTT, ALLEN C. 
291 N. High View Ave., Pearl River, N.Y. 
309 

AHERN, RICHARD J. 

45 Norton Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

309 

AIRASIAN, JOHN S. 

23 Oakley Road, Watertown, Massachusetts 

126, 308, 309 

ALLENDORF, JOSEPH F. 

79 Harvard Ave., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

309 

ANSARA, ERNEST L. 

142 Ravenswood Rd., Waltham, Mass. 

309 

ARCAND, JAMES H. 

Box 174, Juniper St., Beverley Farms, Mass. 

309 

ARENA, SALVATORE C 

22 Maple Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 

309 

ARTESANl, CHARLES J. 

175 Commonw'lth Ave., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

148, 309 

BABIN, CHARLES F. 

6 Winthrop Rd., Lexington. Massachusetts 

214, 215, 309 

BAIRD, DANE E. 

259 Douglass Drive, Bay Village, Ohio 

150,309 

BALFE, JOSEPH M. 

1520 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 

309 

BARRY, JAMES F. 

12 Columbus Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 

150, 309 

BARRY, WILLIAM P. 

40 Richwood St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

310 

BATES, CARLTON F. 

109 Green Street, Woburn, Massachusetts 

310 

BENNETT, THOMAS V. 

505 Baker Street, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

310 

BERAK, GUIDO 

1 5 Lorraine Terrace, Brighton, Massachusetts 

150, 310 

BIGGS, JOHN W. 

56 Winthrop Ave., Braintree, Massachusetts 

310 



BLAHA, HENRY C. 

1529 GreendaJe Rd., Baltimore, Maryland 

176, 310, 369 

BLASSER, RICHARD H. 

129 Academy Ave., Weymouth, Mass. 
310 

BLEAKNEY, RONALD J. 

4 Westwood Road, Natick, Massachusetts 

310 

BOND, WILLIAM B. 

5335 Duke St., Apt. 5, Alexandria, Va. 

143, 311 

BONNER, PAUL A. 

6 Newcroft Circle, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

311 

BOROWICK, JOSEPH J. 

Route 28, Box 357, W. Harwich, Mass. 
311 

BORSA, WILLIAM J. 

1360 Berkshire Ave., Indian Orchard, Mass. 

311 

BOUDREAU, GERARD F. 

607 Watertown St., Newtonville, Mass. 
311 

BRANCA, ROBERT E. 

29 Alameda Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

136, 303, 311,357 

BRAUNEIS, PAUL F. 

1099 Fellsway, Maiden, Massachusetts 

311 

BRAWLEY, JOHN B. 

660 Prospect Drive, Stratford, Connecticut 

311 

BROSNAN, JOHN M. 

59 Bradford Rd., Watertown, Massachusetts 

148, 311 

BRYAN, JAMES M. 

40 Merrill Road, Watertown, Massachusetts 

311 

BUCK, PETER F. 

1 Fairfax Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

312 

BUCKLEY, JOHN S. 

68 Jamaica St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

312 

BUDZINSKI, ROBERT C. 

4 English Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

177,312 

BURKE, JOHN T. 

89 Glendale Rd., Needham, Massachusetts 

312 

BUTTACAVOLI, THOMAS P. 
26 Peck Street, Norwich, Connecticut 
312 

CAHILL, JOHN B. 

22 Davis Avenue, Brookline, Massachusetts 

312 



CALIRI, DOMENIC S. 

12 College Hill Rd., Somerville, Mass. 

312 

CALLEN, CHARLES L. 

30 Lambert Street, Medford, Massachusetts 
139, 312 

CANNON, JOHN J. 

.156 Pollard Rd., Mountain Lakes, N.J. 

312 

CANNON, RICHARD J. 

31 Sunrise Ave., Stoneham, Massachusetts 
312 

CAPP, RICHARD F. 

34 Dalton Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

341 

CARDELLO, PAUL W. 

32 May Street, N. Andover, Massachusetts 
312 

CARMICHAEL, TERENCE 

77 Woodcock Road, Westbury New York 

151 

CARMODY, KEVIN W. 

6121 Nevada Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 
124, 151, 312- 

CARNEGIE, ANDREW L., JR. 

2 Avon Lane, Natick, Massachusetts 

313 

CARUSO, LAWRENCE D. 

730 Boston Post Rd., Weston, Massachusetts 

313 

CASEY, EDWARD F. 

5 Redwood Ter., Wilmington, Massachusetts 

313 

CASEY, WALTER J. 

35-49 83rd St., Jackson Heights, New York 

313 

CESTARI, MICHAEL J. 

128 Saddle Rock Rd., Valley Stream, N.Y. 

CHEVILLOT, JAMES PETER 

1279 East Delavan Ave., Buffalo, New York 

280, 290 

CHIOZZI, RICHARD E. 

68 Glenwood Rd., Somerville, Massachusetts 

313 

CIULLA, LEE FRANCIS 

83 Cocasset Street, Foxboro, Massachusetts 

148, 313 

CLEARY, JAMES E. 

24 Wason Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

314 

CLIFFORD, MICHAEL T. 

59 Sagamore St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

314 

COFFEY, DANIEL J. 

35 Cutter Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

COLEMAN, JOHN E. 

81 Fuller Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

314 



COLLINS, TIMOTHY K. 

67 Grant Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 
314 

CONKLIN, JAY KENNETH 
Conscience Bay Rd., Setauket, New York 
314 

CONLEY, MICHAEL JAMES 

57 Division Street, N. Quincy, Massachusetts 
214, 215, 314 

CONNELLY, THOMAS J. 

43 Bellevue Ave., Winthrop, Massachusetts 

314 

CORBETT, GRAFTON J., Ill 

58 Rosemary Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 
314 

CORNISH, ROBERT H. 

3 1 Larkin Road, W. Newton, Massachusetts 
195,315 

CORRINET, ANDREW C. 

963 Wildwood Rd., Oradell, New Jersey 

315 

COSTELLO, MORGAN J. 

30 Walnut Street, Waterbury, Connecticut 

315 

COUTO, RICHARD L. 

169 Oakland St., Fall River, Massachusetts 
239, 315 

CREEDON, JOHN F. 

386 Crescent St., Brockton, Massachusetts 
315 

CRESPI, MICHAEL P. 

59 Perham St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 
315 

CROSBY, RICHARD E. 

60 Boulevard Road, Dedham, Massachusetts 

315 

CUNNIFF, JOHN P. 

2 Fidelis Way, Brighton, Massachusetts 

184, 185, 186, 195, 276 

DANIELS, RICHARD S. 

9 Spring Park Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

316 

DARMAN, GARY S. 

687 Winthrop St., Medford, Massachusetts 

316 

DAVIS, JOHN R. 

187 Broad Street, Bloomfield, New Jersey 

253, 316 

DAY, THOMAS L. 

18 Herbert Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 

316 

DEAN, JOHN M. 

1460 Blue Hill Ave., Mattapan, Mass. 

316 

DEEGAN, CHARLES J. 

7 Banks Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

316 



DEERING, CHRISTOPHER P. 

146 Chiswick Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 

163, 316 



EAGAN, CHARLES J. 

116 Sussex Drive, Manhasset, New York 

318 



GARBER, ARNOLD 

77 Grove Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 
320 



DELANEY, PAUL G. 

60 Charlemont St., Newton Hinds, Mass. 

148, 215, 316, 319 

DeLUCA, ANTHONY L. 

50 Pleasant Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

316 

DeLUCA, JOHN B. 

165 Milton Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

317 

DEMPSEY, STEPHEN A. 

6 Locust Avenue, Lexington, Massachusetts 
276, 317 

DESILVA, LARRY T. 

8 Shore Rd., Yateston, Smith Parish, Bermuda 

150,317 

DESIMONE, ANTHONY V. 

24 Brookline St., Watertown, Massachusetts 

317 

DILORETO, ROBERT D. 

81 Chelsea Street, Everett, Massachusetts 
317 

DiMEZZA, MARTIN D. 

73 Elm Street, E. Haven, Connecticut 

151, 171, 317 

DiMUZIO, DAVID A. 

93 Cherry Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 

148, 317 

DINEEN, WILLIAM M. 

29 Cushing Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

DIRRANE, BRIAN M. 

68 Milton Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

DOHERTY, EDWARD F. 

44 New Britain Ave., Newington, Conn. 
317 

DOHERTY, PETER S. 

49 Union Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

148, 317 

DOLAN, CHARLES F. 

13 Sturgis Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

317 

DOMINGUE, CHARLES A. 

30 Howe Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

DONOVAN, MICHAEL D. 

7 Westwood Rd., Somerville, Massachusetts 
318 

DRAGONE, VICTOR G., JR. 

34 Stuart Street, Everett, Massachusetts 
318 

DRISCOLL, DANIEL M. 

938 Metropolitan Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

151,318 

DYER, PHILIP C. 

802 Lynn Fells Pkwy, Melrose, Mass. 
191, 193, 195 



EIDT, CHRISTIAN H. 

32-12 85th St., Jackson Heights, New York 

164, 285, 318 

FABRIZIO, WILLIAM R. 

36 Sutcliffe Road, Lynn, Massachusetts 

318 

FEENEY, MARTIN J. 

41 Harvard Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

318 

FERNEY, JOHN C. 

55 Oak Street, Walpole, Massachusetts 

318 

FINN, JAMES J. 

83 Needham Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 

319 

FINNEGAN, ROBERT J. 

23 Whittemore St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

150, 319 

FIORELLI, ROBERT W. 

1 3 Gardner Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

319 

FITZPATRICK, C. J. 

562 Main Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 
319 

FLAVIN, FREDERICK A. 

650 Furnace Brook Pkwy., Quincy, Mass. 

319 

FLEMING, PAUL J. 

19 Ware Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

319 

FLINN, THOMAS J. Ill 

7 Peak Hill Road, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

319 

FOLEY, EDWARD C 

39 Franklin Street, Woburn, Massachusetts 
11, 171, 172, 173, 179, 180, 319 

FRANCO, NICHOLAS DANIEL 

324 Fulton Avenue, Jersey City, New Jersey 

290, 320 

FRAWLEY, JOHN A. 

321 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

320 

FURBUSH, JOSEPH M. 

26 Boynton Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

320 

GAIR, ROBERT F. 

30 Cedar Lane, Scotia, New York 
320 

GALLAGHER, NEIL K. 

39 Tennyson Rd., W. Newton, Mass. 

320 

GALOTTA, EDWARD J. 

117 Pine Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

320 



GATTOZZI, BERNARD A. 

123 Village Street, Medway, Massachusetts 

GAWLAK, ROBERT J. 

38 Baldwin Street, Meriden, Connecticut 
318, 320 

GAYNOR, BRYAN W. 

1456 N. Calhoun Rd., Brookfield, Wisconsin 

143 

GAYNOR, JAMES M. 

1456 N. Calhoun Rd., Brookfield, Wisconsin 

143, 250 

GEANEY, KEVIN R. 

68 Jacob Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

320 

GEDEN, RICHARD C. 

39 Lawton Road, Needham, Massachusetts 
320 

GENTILE, RONALD A. 

95 Chilson Avenue, Mansfield, Massachusetts 

320 

GIGUERE, MAURICE L. 

1 1 School Street, Waterville, Maine 

150, 247, 320 

GILBERT, WILLIAM A. 

55 Mettowee Street, Granville, New York 

321 

GLASHEEN, EDWARD M. JR. 

42 Crescent Street, Waterbury, Connecticut 
150,243,321 

GOGUEN, THEODORE H. 

38 Bigelow Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 

321 

GOUR, WILLIAM F. 

40 Pilgrim Road, Natick, Massachusetts 

321 

GRAY, MARK A. JR. 

119 Freeman St., Brookline, Massachusetts 

321 

GRICUS, PAUL E. 

7 S. Waverly Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
321 

GRIFFIN, GERALD G. 

32 Clarendon Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

GRIFFIN, JOHN P. 

Walloomsac Road, Bennington, Vermont 

322 

GRIFFIN, JOHN T. JR. 

73 Chestnut Street, Weston, Massachusetts 

322 

HACKETT, WILLIAM F. 

63 Landseer St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

150, 322 

HALLAHAN, BRIAN J. 

20 Gardner, N. Easton, Massachusetts 

163, 322 



HANEY, JOHN J. 

34 Roseclair St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

322 



JOHNSON, WILLIAM P. 

163 Oak Trail Rd., Hillsdale, New Jersey 

324 



LANDRIGAN, RICHARD F. 

215 Willow St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

326 



HARRINGTON, JOSEPH F. 

10 Whitefield St., W, Somerville, Mass. 

148,322 



JONES, RICHARD W. 

196 Howard Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

324 



LANZILLI, CARL A. 

12 Old Brook Circle, Melrose, Massachusetts 

327 



HARRINGTON, KEVIN F. 

89 Dumell Ave., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

322 

HARTWELL, PAUL S. 

52 Folsom Street, Revere, Massachusetts 

322 

HASSELMANN, JAMES 

1253 East 28th St., Brooklyn, New York 

301, 323 

HEALY, MICHAEL V. 

49 Washington Street, Eastport, Maine 

323 

HENDERSON, RICHARD J. 

227 Linwood Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

323 

HERENDEEN, ROBERT 

30 Capital Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

143, 150,323 

HERSHMAN. LAWRENCE M. 

1780 Beacon St., Brookline, Massachusetts 

HIBBETT, CHARLES W. 

37 Pontiac Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 

HOCKENBURY, EDWARD J. 
6123 Lawrence St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
10, 150, 198, 229, 231, 282, 293 

HOCKNELL, PETER K. 

2 Shawmut Avenue, Hudson, Massachusetts 
323 

HOSTETTER, DANIEL C. 

72 Oak Ridge Rd., Osterville, Massachusetts 

323 

HOUGHTON, JOHN P. JR. 

4 Spring Lane, Framingham, Massachusetts 

324 

HUNT, EUGENE 

119A Forest Hills St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

151 

HUNTER, DAVID M. 

8 Lotus Path, Natick, Massachusetts 
324 

HURLEY, RICHARD 

9 Maverick St., Marblehead, Massachusetts 
324 

HURLEY, WILLIAM 

39 Elliot Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

236, 308, 324 

HYLAND, MICHAEL J. 

765 Valley Rd., Upper Montclair, N.J. 

324 

JENARD, PAUL B. 

68B Blue Ledge Dr., Roslindale, Mass, 



JONES, WADE 

24 Garfield St., Watertown, Massachusetts 

324 

KEARNAN, JAMES R. 

77 School Street, Milford, Massachusetts 

325 

KEEFFE, JOHN D. 

4 Elm Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

325 

KEELIN, JOHN M. 

257 Huntington Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

325 

KEENAN, MICHAEL J. 

29 Dalrymple St., Boston, Massachusetts 

325 

KEIRSTEAD, ALLAN G. 

27A Linwood St., Arlington, Massachusetts 

187, 195, 282 

KELLEHER, WALTER H. 

592 Summer St., Arlington, Massachusetts 

325 

KELLEY, JOHN B. 

54 Mary Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
325 

KELLEY, JOHN S. 

165 Highland Ave., Quincy, Massachusetts 

325 

KELLEY, KEVIN T. 

346 Meriden Ave., Southington, Conn. 

325 

KELLIHER, DONALD J. 

231 Emerald Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 
326 

KELLY, HENRY K. 

3 Oak Road, Briarcliff, New York 

326 

KELLY, JOHN F. 

24 Lochstead Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

326 

KIRBY, WALTER H. 

42 Otis Street, Milton, Massachusetts 
326 

KRACKELER, WILLIAM J. 

16 Slingerland St., Slingeriand, New York 
238, 250, 326 

KREIN, DOUGLAS G. 

49 Loomis Drive, W. Hartford, Connecticut 

326 

LAMONT, JOHN R. 

43 Coolidge Hill Rd., Watertown, Mass. 
326 



LAPLACA, CHARLES P. JR. 

27 G Street, S. Boston, Massachusetts 

LAPOINTE, JEFFREY C 

45 Bennington St., Quincy, Massachusetts 

327 

EARNER, LAWRENCE W. 

4 Myrtlebank Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

LARRACEY, RICHARD R. 

52 Cummings Ave., Quincy, Massachusetts 

LAUER, WILLIAM E. JR. 

68 White Street, Waterbury, Connecticut 

327 

LAWSON, EDWARD G. 

144 Anawan Rd., N. Attleboro, R.I. 

163, 327 

LAZOTT, WILLIAM J. 

10 E. Main, Hopkinton, Massachusetts 

LEAFFER, ALAN WAYNE 

72 Addington Rd., Brookline, Massachusetts 

327 

LEAHY, DANIEL C. 

2 Vaughn Street, Canton, Massachusetts 

327 

LEAHY, JOHN F. 

20 Reed Ave., S. Weymouth, Massachusetts 

327 

LEETCH, RICHARD J. 

92 Weston Avenue, Braintree, Massachusetts 

327 

LEONARD, JOHN P. 

100 Main Street, Hingham, Massachusetts 

328 

LEONE, JOHN J. 

31 Happy Street, Norwich, Connecticut 

256, 280, 290, 328 

LISENO, FRANK D. 

30 Rena Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

328 

LONG, JAMES F. 

1 1 Stetson Street, E. Braintree, Massachusetts 
328 

LUFKIN, THOMAS P. 

24 Gloucester Ave., Gloucester, Mass. 

195, 328 

LYNCH, FRANCIS C 

28 Buick Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
245, 328 

LYNCH, JOHN E. 

35 Lindale Avenue, Dedham, Massachusetts 

329 



LYNCH, WILLIAM H. 

37 Hilltop Rd., Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

329 

LYONS, HENRY J. 

110 Victoria Lawn, Stratford, Connecticut 

329 



McCarthy, paul v. 

10 Weyanoke St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 
126, 308, 330 

McCORMACK, GREGORY A. 

41 Traincroft Rd., Medford, Massachusetts 

330 



MONAHAN, JAMES P. 

48 Edgar Road, Scituate, Massachusetts 

332 

MOONEY, JOSEPH R. 

6 Magnolia St., Arlington. Massachusetts 
332 



LYONS, ROBERT E. 

7 Clancy Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

329 

MACAIONE, GEORGE J. 

183 School Street, Franklin, Massachusetts 

MACIEROWSKI, CHESTER J. 
629 Dorchester Ave., S. Boston, Mass. 
329 

MACKSOUD, EDMUND A. 

226 Wood Haven Rd., Pawtucket, R.I. 

329 

MacLACHLAN, RONALD S. 

1 59-02 28th Avenue, Flushing, New York 

329 

MADDEN, LESLIE I. JR. 

7 Amherst Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

329 

MAFFEI, KENNETH M. 

12 St. Gregory St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

329, 338 

MAGGIO, EDWARD D. 

254 Winthrop St., Medford, Massachusetts 

MAHONEY, KEVIN 

61 Thornton Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

MAHONEY, P. STEPHEN 

20 Whitney Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 

329 

MALONEY, ROBERT E. 

41 Pinewood Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

329 

MANNING, MICHAEL T. 

73 Sawyer Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

329 

MARCHILDON, JOHN L. 

31 Surrey Lane, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 
330 

MAROBELLA, FRANCIS R. 

12 Westland Rd., Watertown, Massachusetts 

330 

MARTIN, ROBERT J. 

343 Broadway, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

330 

MATTHEWS, EDWARD J. 

20 Calvin Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

McCarthy, charles j. 

654 W. Washington Ave., Elmira, N.Y. 
330 



McCORMACK, JOSEPH L. 

52 Bond Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 
330 

McCORMACK, RICHARD H. 

25 Sheldon Street, Milton, Massachusetts 
331 

McDERMOTT, BRIAN D. 

61 Brington Rd., Brookline, Massachusetts 

331 

McDonald, michael j. 

158 Walnut St., Lynbrook, Long Island, N.Y. 

McELANEY, EDWARD J. 

66 Bailey Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

331 

McGOWAN, RICHARD F. 

12 Hastings St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

331 

McGRATH, JOSEPH J. 

East Main Street, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

331 

McGregor, stuart j. 

259 Windsor Rd., Wood Ridge, New Jersey 
151, 331 

McKAY, THOMAS J. 

53 South Moison Rd., Blauvelt, New York 
151, 331 

McMAHON, JOHN D. 

10 Willow Street, Norwalk, Connecticut 

McMURTRY, GEORGE C. 

Sandy Pond Street, S. Lincoln, Massachusetts 

331 

McNAMARA, JEFFREY J. 

1 1 Ives Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 
331 

MEEHAN, JOSEPH X. 

6 Forest Street, Maplewood, New Jersey 

332 

MESSIER, ROBERT A. 

Cross Street, Southboro, Massachusetts 

332 

MILES, JAMES F. 

9 Newcomb Place, Taunton, Massachusetts 

332 

MILES, PAUL R. 

166 Harriet Ave., N. Quincy, Massachusetts 

80, 332 

MINAHAN, NEAL E. 

104 Barnard Ave., Watertown, Massachusetts 

332 



MOORE, GERALD F. 

l4 Luce Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

332 

MORIARTY, MAURICE P. 

75 Forest Street, Manchester, Connecticut 
332 

MORRIS, ROBERT J. 

7 Celia Road, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

332 

MORRISON, CHARLES E. 

6 Sheldon St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

332 

MORRISON, KEVIN J. 

486 Brookline Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 

333 

MOSCARITOLO, PATRICK B. 

62 Orient Avenue, E. Boston, Massachusetts 

333 

MOYLAN, JOHN K. 

75 Riddell St., Greenfield, Massachusetts 

189, 192, 333 

MULDOON, JOHN S. 

18 Kensington, Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

333 

MULHEARN, THOMAS B. 

12 Euston Road, Garden City, New York 

333 

MULLANEY, CHRISTOPHER O. 
96 Cliff Road, Milton, Massachusetts 
333 

MULLEN, JAMES C 

6 Silver Birch Rd., Warwick, Rhode Island 

186, 187, 193, 195, 334 

MULLEN, JOHN D. 

254 Cochituate Rd., Framingham, Mass. 

334 

MUNGOVAN, CHRISTOPHER C 

22 Martin Road, Milton, Massachusetts 
334 

MUNGOVAN, DAVID J. 

79 Valecrest Dr., Islington, Ontario, Canada 

150,253, 334 

MURPHY, BRIAN M. 

14 David Road, Latham, New York 

150,334 

MURPHY, JOHN J., JR. 

504 Sixth Street, S. Boston, Massachusetts 

334 



McCarthy, paul f. 

61 Bellvale St., Maiden, Massachusetts 
330 



MOLLOY, CHARLES D. 

25 Cornell St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 
332 



MURPHY, PATRICK K. 

5 Cunningham Rd., Wellesley Hill, Mass. 

186, 191, 195, 334 



MURPHY, RICHARD G. 

63 Iroquois Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

334 

MURPHY, SEAN J. 

109 Strathmore Rd., Brookline, Mass. 

NICASTRO, JOSEPH C. 

45 Edison Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

NOLAN, PATRICK R. 

10 Harland Ave., Waterbury, Connecticut 

335 

NOLAN, RICHARD H., JR. 

7 Lawrence Road, Weston, Massachusetts 

335 

NORRIS, WILLIAM P. 

431 Bunker Hill St., Charlestown, Mass. 

236, 335 

O'CONNELL, DAVID J. 

24 CK'erlook Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

335 

O'CONNOR, JAMES L. 

10 Parker Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

335 

O'CONNOR, JOSEPH T. 

102 Circle Road, Syracuse, New York 

150, 335 

O'CONNOR, ROGER P. 

1 30 Lincoln St., Newton Highlands, Mass. 
335 

O'DONNELL, EDWARD J. 

5005 Madison Ave., Trumbull, Connecticut 

335 

O'KEEFE, KEVIN J. 

112 Wellesley Ave., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

148, 336 

OLDFIELD, JEFFREY J. 

520 North Main St., Cohasset, Massachusetts 

336 

O'LEARY, RICHARD 

22 Robeson Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

O'LEARY, TIMOTHY F. 

16 I-angdon Ave., Watertown, Massachusetts 

336 

O'NEIL, ROBERT F. 

41 Lowe Avenue, Stoughton, Massachusetts 
336 

O'NEILL, BRIAN T. 

27 Colonial Drive, Arlington, Massachusetts 
336 

O'NEILL, EDWARD J. 

Deerhaven Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts 

336 

O'NEILL, WILLIAM D. 

22 Granville Rd., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

337 

O'ROURKE, PAUL J. 

28 Tacoma Street, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 
151,337 



OSTRANDER, STEPHEN F. 

20 Crescent St., Franklin, Massachusetts 

PACELLI, WILLIAM H. 

11 Mohawk Drive, W. Haven, Connecticut 

150,252,337 

PALMER, CHARLES J. 

140 Rockland St., New Bedford, Mass. 

151,337 

PANGIONE, HENRY A. 

63 Butternut Lane, Methuen, Massachusetts 

337 

PARKS, JOHN T. 

635 La Grange St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

148, 337 

PASQUANTONIO, GERALD J. 

104 Stratford St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 
148, 337 

PATENAUDE, DAVID I. 
Box 127, Pomfret, Connecticut 
337 

PATTURELLI, PAUL J. 

24 Brooks Park, Medford, Massachusetts 

337 

PERRY, JAMES E. 

7 Granite Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

337 

PICARELLO, ANTHONY R. 

29 Falcon Street, E. Boston, Massachusetts 

338 

PISANO, PHILIP A., JR. 

96 Hammond St., Waltham, Massachusetts 

338 

POPE, RICHARD J. 

7 Grace Drive, Cohasset, Massachusetts 

338 

POWER, JAMES J. 

580 Park Avenue, New York, New York 

POWERS, JOHN R. 

409 Park Street, N. Reading, Massachusetts 
338 

PRIFTY, FREDERICK 

9 Hillside Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 

219, 338 



PROCACCINI, PAUL R. 

106 High Plain St., Walpole, Massachusetts 

338 



PUCCIA, MICHAEL P. 

6 Rendall Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

338 

PUCILLO, JOHN F. 

40 Henry Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

338 

QUAGENTI, JOSEPH B. 

27 Martin Street, Revere, Massachusetts 

339 



QUINN, JOHN E. 

48 Herford Avenue, S. Portland, Maine 

339 

QUIRKE, MICHAEL H. 

Balpate Road, Georgetown, Massachusetts 

339 

RAGUSA, ROBERT R., JR. 

95 Stanton Avenue, Revere, Massachusetts 
339 

RECOMENDES, JOSEPH A. 

1191 Saratoga St., E. Boston, Massachusetts 

339 

REDGATE, THOMAS J. 

99 Sterling Place, Bridgeport, Connecticut 

151,339 

REGAN, ARTHUR E., II 

354 Park Street, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

339 

RENDA, ALAN C 

6 Tally Ho Lane, Framingham, Massachusetts 

339 

ROBINSON, JAMES T. 

34 Homes Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

340 

ROGAN, DENNIS C 

66 Roanoke Rd., Springfield, Massachusetts 

ROGERS, ANDREW J. JR. 

45 Gorman Rd., Framingham, Massachusetts 

340 

RONDEAU, JACQUES A. 

54 Forest Hills St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

340 



ROSS, PAUL E. 

31 Fifth Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 

340 

ROSS, PAUL K. 

37 Ontario Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

340 

ROTONDI, LOUIS J. 

85-25 Chevy Chase St., Jamaica, New York 

340 



RUST, RICHARD P. 

22 Coolidge Road, AUston, Massachusetts 

340 

RYAN, ARTHUR S., JR. 

80 Nonantum St., Brighton, Massachusetts 

340 

RYAN, ROBERT E. 

64 Edison Street, Staten Island, New York 

341, 381 

SALLY, FRANCIS J. 

192 Madison St., Dedham, Massachusetts 

341 

SAMPSON, CHARLES H. 

17 Usher Road, W. Medford, Massachusetts 

341 



SATTELMAIR, JOHN R. 

52 High Rock Rd., Wayland, Massachusetts 

341 

SCATURRO, NICHOLAS J, 

54 Coolidge Street, Revere, Massachusetts 

SCHMIDT, WILLIAM R. 

35 Beardsley Parkway, Trumbull, Connecticut 
334, 341 

SCHMITT, JAY A. 

37 Belmont Parkway, Hempstead, New York 

341 

SCIBELLI, STEPHEN P., JR. 

5 Damon Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

126, 151,236,308,341 

SERGI, JOSEPH A. 

41 Mifflin Drive, N. Andover, Massachusetts 

341 

SGRO, PAUL A. 

40 Wareham Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

342 

SHEA, ARTHUR E. 

56 St. Brendan Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 
342 

SHEA, JOHN M. 

93 High Haith Rd., Arlington, Massachusetts 

338 

SHEEHAN, JAMES M. 

81 High Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

342 

SHEEHAN, JOHN D. 

100 Langdon Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

SIEBOLD, JOHN N. 

2770 N. Grant Blvd., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

245, 342 

SMITH, CHARLES A. 

47 Vinson Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

342 

SMITH, CHARLES P. 

Lyons Mill Road, Owings Mills, Maryland 

11, 173, 176, 178,342 

SMITH, RICHARD C 

20 Old Farm Drive, Newington, Connecticut 

342 

STEARNS, RICHARD W. 

Hartford, Ave., Bellingham, Massachusetts 

342 

STERITI, MICHAEL A. 

57 Clark Avenue, Chelsea, Massachusetts 
343 

STEWART, ROBERT C. 

524 Cambridge St., Brighton, Massachusetts 

343 



SULLIVAN, JOSEPH R., JR. 

80 O'Callaghan Way, S. Boston, Mass. 

SULLIVAN, LEWIS R. 

33 Morey Road, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

343 

SULLIVAN, RICHARD D. 

2 Newton Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

343 

SULLIVAN, STEPHEN P. 

116 Murdock Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

SUMM, JOHN E. 

15 Harned Place, Trumbull, Connecticut 

151,239,251,294,343 

SWARTZ, PAUL J. 

14 Chickering Road, Dedham, Massachusetts 

SWIFT, WILLIAM F. 

29 Laurence Road, Reading, Massachusetts 

148, 343 

SYRON, RICHARD F. 

24 Green Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

344 

TARZIA, DONALD D. 

276 East Street, Hingham, Massachusetts 
344 

TA VILLA, JOSEPH P. 

15 Joan Road, Medford, Massachusetts 
344 

TAYLOR, RICHARD S. 

4207 Linkwood Road, Baltimore, Maryland 

290, 344 

TIERNEY, PAUL B. 

153 Appleton St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

344 

TOBIN, RICHARD J. 

76 Laurie Ave., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

344 

TODD, GEORGE W. 

18 Sycamore Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 
345 

TOOMEY, EDWARD W. 

12 Dexter Road, Newtonville, Massachusetts 

345 

TORRES, FEDERICO L. 

65 1 Roosevelt, San Juan, Puerto Rico 

TOSI, BYRON G., JR. 

1954 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

345' 

TRUMBOUR, NEIL P. 

85 Lafayette Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

345 



VANBUREN, JOHN JOSEPH 

62 Bartlett Drive, Manhasset, New York 

346 

VAUGHN, CHARLES H., JR. 

2124 N. Troy Street, Arlington, Virginia 

252, 346 

VENETO, PETER J. 

65 Bradfield Ave., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

346 

WALSH, RICHARD G. 

30 Hillside Ave., E. Dedham, Massachusetts 

346 

WARD, PAUL F. 

9 Brooksdale Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

148, 346 

WARD, ROBERT J. 

2130 E. Tremont Avenue, Bronx, New York 

243, 282, 346 

WHEELER, ROBERT R. 

104 Fairway Dr., W. Newton, Massachusetts 

346 

WILKINS, JOHN P. 

46 Central Ave., S. Braintree, Massachusetts 

346 

WILLIAMSON, JOHN A. 
Route 3, Hartfield, Virginia 
347, 385, 388 

WILSON, ROBERT A. 

490 Maple Street, Hathorne, Massachusetts 

347 

WILSON, THOMAS J. 

Ward Road, Southboro, Massachusetts 

347 

ZIZLSPERGER, THEODOR C. 

89 Mt. Prospect Ave., Verona, New Jersey 

150,347 



SCHOOL OF 
EDUCATION 

AHEARN, EILEEN M. 

Ill Adams Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 

349 

ALBANESE, SUSAN M. 

148 Fairbanks Road, Dedham, Massachusetts 

349 

ANDERSON, IRENE H. 

157 Stanton Ave., Auburndale, Mass. 

349 



SULLIVAN, EDWARD P. 

3 Lincoln Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

343 



ULIN, DAVID P. 

47 Hiawatha Road, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

345 



ANDERSON THOMAS P. 

9 Alicia Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

220, 349 



SULLIVAN, GILBERT C. 

19 Bruce Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

343 



URBANIK, DALE F. 

125 Rosemary Road, Dedham, Massachusetts 

345 



ARMITAGE, DIANE F. 

41 MacArthur Road, Natick, Massachusetts 

6, 171, 224, 349 



ASTUTI, SANDRA B. 

9 Woodville Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

15, 144,238, 348, 349 



BURNS, JUDITH A. 

431 Parker Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

7,256,351 



COYNE, ELLEN M. 

19 Ely Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

353 



AUSTIN, JOHN W. 

904 3rd N.W., Washington, D.C. 

10, 197, 198, 227, 228, 230, 231, 274 

BACON, LINDA M. 

135 Country Club Road, Melrose, Mass. 

349 



CAHILL, SUSAN R. 

34-14 85 St., Jackson Heights, New York 

238, 351 

CALLAHAN, MARY T. 

Hospital Road, Harding, Massachusetts 

351 



CRONIN, PAMELA E. 

14 Caulfield Road, Wayland, Massachusetts 

353 

CYR, ANNE MARIE P. 

26 Leeds Terrace, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

353 



BAGNELL, DEBRA L. 

27 Lilly Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 
349 

BARRY, SHEILA M. 

12 Crooker Drive, Lynn, Massachusetts 

BELLOW, PATRICIA C. 

63 Hilltop Road, Mystic, Connecticut 

349 

BERTUCCI, ROSEMARIE 

52 Standish Ave., WoUaston, Massachusetts 
144, 349 

BOCCIA, CLAIRE L. 

4 Birchwood Lane, Hartsdale, N.Y. 
349 

BOWLER, ELLEN G. 

46 Norwood Street, Portland, Maine 

349 

BRENNAN, KATHLEEN A. 

6 Cedar Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 

350 

BROWN, CAROL A. 

33 Ash Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
350 

BROWN, JAMES E. 

33 Ash Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 

350 

BROWN, KATHLEEN M. 

33 Ash Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 

144,350 

BUCCI, DANIEL C. 

69 Grove Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

350 

BUCKLEY, MAURA D. 

32 Garfield Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 

350 

BULGAR, THOMAS L, 

117 Monument, West Medford, Mass. 

350 

BURKE, EDMUND S. 

69 Robinwood Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

350 

BURKE, JANET P. 

401 Canton Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 

351 

BURNS, JOHN C. 

21 Amory Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
351 



CAMMARATA, PATRICK J. 

640 LaGrange St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

351 

CANAVAN, KATHLEEN A. 

1072 Highland Ave., Needham, Mass. 

351 

CANTY, MARGARET A. 

5 Randolph St., Teaticket, Massachusetts 

351 

CARBONE, ELIZABETH M. 

139 Vinal Street, Revere, Massachusetts 
352 

CARON, JANE E. 

35 George Street, S. Dartmouth, Mass. 

352 

CARTY, CATHERINE A. 

37 Foster Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
352 

CASTALDO, FRANK C. 

176 Revere Street, Revere, Massachusetts 
352 

CANTANZANO, JOYCE C. 

31 Albion Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

352 

CHAPMAN, JOYCE M, 

27 Davis Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

352 

CICCHETTI, JOAN R. 

48 Mendon Street, Hopedale, Massachusetts 

134, 352 

COLLINS, JEAN E. 

12 Harrison Ave., Braintree, Massachusetts 

352 

COLLINS, MARTHA L. 

8 Thornton Rd., Winchester, Massachusetts 

352 

COMISKEY, PATRICIA E. 

4 Bluefield Terr., S. Weymouth, Mass. 

352 

CORBETT, PAULA M. 

58 Rosemary St., Norwood, Massachusetts 

352 

CORONETZ, MELANIE A. 

93 Nassau Avenue, Malverne, New York 

352 

COTTOM, JAMES W. 

63 Myrtle Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

353 



DAGNESE, LOUIS A. 

1 1 Herbert Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
353 

D'AMICO, JOSEPH A. 

78 Main Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

353 

DARNEY, SUSAN C. 

101 Douglas Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

354 

DAVIS, CAROL F. 

385 Essex Street, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

354 

DELANY, FRANCES E. 

180 Gaylor Road, Scarsdale, New York 

238, 348, 354 

DelSORDO, JOAN M. 

205 Princeton St., East Boston, Mass. 

354 

DiPERNA, JOANN T. 

1 2 Pine Court, Briarcliff Manor, New York 
354 

DOHERTY, JOHN J. 

14 Newton Road, Medford, Massachusetts 
354 

DOLAN, MARY T. 

1725 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 
354 

DOYLE, JANET R. 

9 Harding Road, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

354 

FARRELL, MARY E. 

20 Dolphin Green, Port Washington, N.Y. 

355 

FERNEY, JAMES R. 

55 Oak Street, Walpole, Massachusetts 

355 

FOLEY, PATRICIA A. 

36 Aberdeen St., Newton Highlands, Mass. 

355 

FORD, ROBERT M. 

69 Langdon Ave., Watertown, Mass. 

355 

FORMAL, LORRAINE C 

123 Canner Street, New Haven, Connecticut 

355 

GANNON, ANN MAUREEN 

196 Faneuil Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

355 



GARIBOTTO, RONALD 

245 North Road, Bedford, Massachusetts 

355 

GASPARI, CLARE A. 

446 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 

355 

GENOVA, ROSE M. 

144 College Farm Rd., WaJtham, Mass. 

144, 356 

GIESEN, ANN D. 

507 Hunt Lane, Manhasset, New York 

356 

GILMORE, ROSEMARY J. 

50 Walnut Street, Waterbury, Connecticut 

356 

GLYNN, MAUREEN F. 

9 Elton Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
356 

GREY, SISTER MARIE GORETTI 
St. Francis Convent, Kingston, Jamaica 
356 

GRODEN, HAROLD M. 

401 East Street, Walpole, Massachusetts 

356 

GUILFOYLE, PATRICIA M. 

37 Magdala Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

356 

HALEY, CLAIRE P. 

15 Torrey Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

356 

HALLIGAN, MARY C. 

40 Manning Boulevard, Albany, N.Y. 

7, 238, 239, 356 

HAMILTON, KENNETH M. 

577 Broad St., E. Weymouth, Massachusetts 

356 

HARRIS, DEBORAH S. 

39 Jersey Street, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

357 

HARRISON, SISTER MARY CECILIA 
St. Francis Convent, Kingston, Jamaica 
357 

HAYES, MARY ANN C. 

11 Oak Street, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 

357 

HAYES, ROBERT A. 

14 Anna Road, Woburn, Massachusetts 
127, 348, 357 

HEALEY, DANIEL X. 

19 Burke Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

357 

HOSIE, KATHERINE M. 

15 Chandler Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
357 

HUGHES, BERNARDINE C. 

10 Sherrick Ave., Holbrook, Massachusetts 
357 



HUTCHINSON, RICHARD J. 

24 Spaulding St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 
357 

IMBORNONE, KATHLEEN 

8 Englewood Ave., Everett, Massachusetts 

358 

IWANICKI, EDWARD F. 

1 38 East St., Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

137,358 

JOLLEY, EILEEN K. 

25 Drury Lane, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
358 

JONES, JOHN T. 

27 Grafton Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 
358 

JUDGE, PAULA B. 

33 Cypress Street, Wrentham, Massachusetts 

358 

KANE, BARBARA A. 

28 Robinhood Road, Natick, Massachusetts 
358 

KARAM, JANET M. 

241 Whiting Ave., Dedham, Massachusetts 

358 

KASTORF, DORIS P. 

148 Standish Rd., Watertown, Mass. 

163,358 

KELLEY, THOMAS J. 

32 Chardon Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

359 

KELLY, J. MICHAEL 

467 Washington St., Brighton, Massachusetts 

359 

KEOUGH, LAWRENCE R. 

67 Harbor View, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

153, 359 

KERIVAN, GEORGE F. 

25 Forbes Road, Westwood, Massachusetts 

359 

LAKIS, DOROTHY T. 

76 Alicia Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

144, 359 

LAMBERT, STEPHANIE A. 

19 Gordon Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

359 

LANDRY, ELIZABETH M. 

49 Worcester St., Belmont, Massachusetts 

339 

LEE, DIANE E. 

36 Evans Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

359 

LENTINE, PATRICIA A. 

83 Badger Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

238, 360 

LHEUREUX, JOHN H. 

72 Canner Street, New Haven, Connecticut 

360 



LIBBEY, JANET M. 

234 High Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

15,238,360 

LOHOSKI, MARY B. 

7 Lindauer Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

144, 360 

LORD, SALLY A. 

135 Cliff Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

360 

LUCEY, JOHN T. 

39 Clark Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

360 

MACKLIN, MARY ANN E. 

7 Village Lane. Arlington, Massachusetts 
360 

MACRELLI, DOROTHY L. 

25 Winthrop St., Framingham, Mass. 

360 

MAHONEY, MARIANNE T. 

20 Rose Hill Way, Waltham, Massachusetts 

360 

MAY, DENNIS M. 

24 Huntervale Ave., Rye, New Hampshire 

360 

MAZZONE, MARGUERITE M. 

100 George Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

360 

MAZZOTTA, JANICE A. 

135 Lexington St., Lawrence, Mass. 

144, 238, 360 

McAULIFFE, JOAN M. 

3 Fairmount Ave., Wakefield, Mass. 
361 

MCCARTHY, MAUREEN T. 

32 Oregon Court, Roxbury, Massachusetts 

361 

MCCARTHY, MICHAEL B. 

4 Grand Ave., Millers Falls, Massachusetts 
361 

McCLUSKEY, MARYELLEN 

8 Kelleran Street, Houlton, Maine 
361 

Mcdonald, john a. 

74 Stanton Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 
361 

McDonnell, anne m. 

84 Waltham Street, Maynard, Massachusetts 
361 

McGINNIS. MARIANNE F. 

16 Cypress Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

142, 362 

MEARA, ANNE M. 

206 Jones Lane, Stamford, Connecticut 

362 

MILAN, CAROL 

42 Oakton Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

362 



MESTEHAN, SUSANNE 

68 Meredith Circle, Milton, Massachusetts 

362 



ONEIL, ROBERT H. 

21 Grant Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
364 



SMOOT, JANE M. 

43 Tramlatt Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

238, 366 



MOLONEY, MAUREEN J. 

3 Washington Terr., Dedham, Mass. 

362 



OROURKE, BERNADETTE M. 

67 Paris Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

365 



STABILE, CAROLE S. 

133 Ocean St., Brant Rock, Massachusetts 

238, 239, 366 



MOONEY, PHILIP F. 

14 Bourne Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

144, 362 



OTOOLE, MAUREEN M. 

99 North Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 

365 



STOLTZE, WALTER G. 

9 Delmore St., Newton Highlands, Mass. 

366 



MOORE, DAVID E. 

21 Circuit Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

144, 362 

MOORE, PAMELA E. 

25 Scott Avenue, Watertown, Connecticut 

362 

MORIARTY, NORA F. 

535 Randolph Ave., Milton, Massachusetts 

363 

MORRISON, LESLIE F. 

60 Hacker Road, Lynn, Massachusetts 

363 

MULCAHY, PETER F. 

76 Landseer, Boston, Massachusetts 

363 

MURRAY, SUSAN E. 

2 Upham Street, Randolph, Massachusetts 

144, 236, 363 

MUSTO, FREDERICK W. 

66 Radcliffe Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

363 

NUGENT, BARBARA E. 

4011 N.E. 27th Terr., Pompano Beach, Fla. 

363 

OBERHAUSER, GRACE M. 

95 Thurston St., Somerville, Massachusetts 

363 

O'BRIEN, ANN M. 

55 Dundee Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 

363 

O'BRIEN, NANCY M. 

831 Centre St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

364 



PALMER, LEONARD P. 

28 Highland St., W. Concord, Massachusetts 

365 

PAPOULA, MANUEL R. 

151 Orange Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

198, 365 

POPLAWSKI, LEONA P. 

14 Waldo Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

365 

PRENDERGAST, ELAINE M. 

71 Richardson Road, Lynn, Massachusetts 

365 

RAZUAD, GLORIA E. 

5 G Street, S. Boston, Massachusetts 

365 

REGAN, ROBERT E. 

59 Fern Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

RICCI, JEANNE 

807 Salem Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

365 

RIDGE, BRENDAN P. 

36 Lyndhurst St., Dorchester, Mass. 

RILEY, FRANCIS L, 

46 Corcoran Pk., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

365 

ROBERTS, WILLIAM M. 

12 Walnut Street, Needham, Massachusetts 

ROYLES, THOMAS W. 

98 Thirlmere Avenue, S. Portland, Maine 

365 

RYAN, JANICE M. 

101 Berwick Place, Norwood, Massachusetts 

365 



STONE, BARBARA G. 

8 Summit Place, Newburyport, Mass. 

366 

STRAGGAS, JOANNE E. 

75 Maple Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

144, 366 

STRUZZIERY, MARY J. 

73 Bellevue Hill Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

366 

SULLIVAN, CAROLE D. 

55 Becket Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 
144, 366 

SULLIVAN, MAURA C 

56 Milton Road, Braintree, Massachusetts 
366 

SULLIVAN, MAUREEN E. 

35 Lemuyne St., Braintree, Massachusetts 

124, 238, 239, 367 

SULLIVAN, PATRICIA E. 

78 Kittredge St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

367 

SZYNAL, JOAN V. 

4 Prescott Road, Ipswich, Massachusetts 

239, 367 

THARP, VIVIAN L. 

4 N. Hunter Avenue, Auburn, New York 

171,224,367 

THORNE, RICHARD L., JR. 

18 CoUincote St., Stoneham, Massachusetts 

367 

TOMBARI, RAYMOND J. 

34 Edgemont Rd., E. Braintree, Mass. 

367 



O'KEEFE, ANNE M. 

6 Parkman Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

364 



ST. PIERRE, BARBARA A. 

32 Woodland Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

365 



TORAN, ROBERT N. 

69 Marshall Street, Needham, Massachusetts 

367 



O'LEARY, KAREN A. 

22 Bailey Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

364 



SCACCIA, ELAINE D. 

59 Readville, Readville, Massachusetts 

366 



TORTORICI, MARGUERITE R. 

119 Ferry Street, Everett, Massachusetts 
367 



OLEY, EVELYN C. 

64 Highland Ave., Arlington, Massachusetts 

364 



SCALZO, ANNE L. 

1288 W. Pleasant St., Brockton, Mass. 

366 



TRA VERSO, DAVID 

9 Dwight Avenue, Plymouth, Massachusetts 

368 



O'MALLEY, ANN 

877 Commonwealth Ave., Newton, Mass. 

159 

O'MALLEY, CECELIA R. 

1 27 Damon Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

364 



SCULLEN, ANNE R. 

220 Westover Dr., Haddonfield, N. J. 

256, 366 

SJOSTEDT, ELIZABETH M. 

105 Berden Street, Watertown, Connecticut 

127, 144, 348, 366 



TYBURE, ROSEANN M. 

81 Orchard Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

368 

VanDenBERGHE, JAN A. 

62 Spring Street, Foxboro, Massachusetts 

368 



VanDenBERGHE, mark H. 

62 Spring Street, Foxboro, Massachusetts 

368 

WALSH, KATHLEEN M. 

16 Doris Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

368 

WEST, ARLENE M. 

79 Alicia Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

WHITE, PAUL F. 

37 Mather Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

368 

WYCKOFF, ANNE M. 

22 Hardy Ave., Watertown, Massachusetts 

368 

YOUNG, THOMAS K., JR. 

33 Aspinwall Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

368 

YWOSKUS, ANTHONY S. 

547 E. 5th Street, S. Boston, Massachusetts 

144 

ZAILSKAS, LORRAINE E. 

431 Piedmont Street, Waterbury, Connecticut 

13, 171, 224, 368 

EVENING 
COLLEGE 

AVERY, RICHARD W. 

13 Glenley Terrace, Brighton, Massachusetts 

BARLOW, GERALD M. 

35 Madden Avenue, Milford, Massachusetts 

BARRY, JOHN J., JR. 

45 Westmoreland St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BARRY, SHARON BULLOCK 

80 Arthur St., E. Braintree, Massachusetts 

BERGERON, DONALD H. 

39 Needham Road, Danvers, Massachusetts 

BROSS, FREDERICK S. 

32 Justin Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

BURKE, JAMES A. 

107 Thacher Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

387 

CAMACHO, HAZEL J. 

11 Auburn Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

CANNIFF, RICHARD P. 

53 Spring Ct. Ext., Woburn, Mass. 

387 

CARTER, SANDRA A. 

4l Barry Street, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

COLLINS, CAROL A. 

20 Blossom Road, Braintree, Massachusetts 

387 

CONNELLY, JOHN J. 

174 Federal Street, Salem, Massachusetts 



CONNOLY, JOHN P. 

35 Redlands Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

COPPINGER, DANIEL J. 

5 Cass Street, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

COSTEDIO, WARREN J. 

12 Charlesmere Rd., N. Billerica, Mass. 

387 

CRONIN, THOMAS H. 

1 1 Holly Street, Burlington, Massachusetts 

CURTIN, TIMOTHY J. 

39 Alden Street, Needham, Massachusetts 

DANEHY, JOHN J. 

48 Parsons Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

DeGAGNE, PAUL L. 

134 Tyler Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

DeSIMONE, EDWIN A. 

32 Coffee Street, Medway, Massachusetts 

DONOVAN, THOMAS J. 

5 Cygnet Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

EMINIAN, MARGARET A. 

49 Lake Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
387 

FINNEGAN, RICHARD W. 

23 Whittemore St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

387 

FLEMING, LEO F. 

43 Emerald Ave., S. Braintree, Mass. 

FORDE, MAUREEN B. 

31 Hunnewell Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

387 

FRAZER, DANIEL A. 

390 Old Lancaster Rd., Sudbury, Mass. 

387 

GAGNON, CARROLL R. 

12 Stimson St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

GORMAN, FRANK A. 

43 High Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

GUTIERREZ, PEDRO E. 

1595 Beacon Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

HALEWIJN, ANNETTE E. 

37 Leary Street, Cochituate, Massachusetts 

HALL, NORMAN J. 

70 Valley Road, Norwood, Massachusetts 

387 

HALLION, MARY ELLEN 

15 Bay View Dr., Swampscott, Mass. 

HAYES, WILLIAM J. 

12 Hinckley St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

HILL, DONALD J. 

6 Cushing Street, WoUaston, Massachusetts 

HYLAND, MARGUERITE F. 

17 Potosi Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

387 



HYNES, ALICE M. (MOTHER) 
Jeanne D'Arc Academy, Milton, Mass. 

JONASSON, ELEANOR F. 

312 Lake Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts 



KENNEDY, ROBERT H. 

31 Nancy Avenue, Peabody, Massachusetts 



LAVOIE, ANNE M. 

69 Garfield Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

LeBLANC, HERVE J. 

599 Western Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 

LILLYMAN, JOSEPH B. 

67 Chester Street, Allston, Massachusetts 

LOBUR, PETER 

14 Mt. Everett St., Dorchester, Mass. 

LUSCHICK, RICHARD J. 

286 Chestnut Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 



MAHONEY, LAWRENCE M. 

580 Bridge Street, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

388 

MALING, GEORGE W. 

68 Abington Ave., Holbrook; Massachusetts 



MARTIN, GERALD C 

10 Hatch Street, S. Boston, Massachusetts 

McCADDEN, JAMES F. 

9 Donald Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 

McCADDEN, JOHN F. 

105 Sylvia Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

McEACHERN, JOSEPH C. 

155 Lawrence Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

388 

McGAHAN, THOMAS L. 

57 Upland Road, Somerville, Massachusetts 

388 

McGREEVY, GEORGE M. 

22 University Lane, Methuen, Massachusetts 

McINERNEY, SUSANEE M. 

8 Ellengsburg Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

McNICHOL, ANNE M. 

165 Walnut Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 



McPARTLIN, PAUL F. 

126 Church St., Winchester, Massachusetts 



McSOLEY, RAYMOND 

59 Auburn St. Ext., Framingham, Mass. 

MOLUMPHY, DAVID R. 

15 Birchwood Rd., E. Hartford, Conn. 



MORRISSEY. JEAN L. 

103 Bright Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 



MOULIN, NORMAN H. 

17 Vose Avenue, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

MURPHY, ROBERT F. 

26 Heath Road, Arhngton, Massachusetts 

O'BRIEN, DAVID E. 

14 Moulton Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

389 

OGILVIE, WILLIAM J. 

8 Kelly Road, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

OHARA, PATRICK J. 

21 Lindbergh Ave., W. Newton, Mass. 

389 

OLEARY, HELEN G. 

30 Midland St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

389 

OLEARY, JOHN T. 

30 Auburn Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

389 

PEARSALL, DORIS T. 

120 Mariposa Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

PENDER, ROBERT H. 

40 Oakridge St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

389 

RENZI, ANTHONY L. 

23 Irving Street, Revere, Massachusetts 

ROCHE, MARIE E. 

16 Preston Road, Somer\'ille, Massachusetts 

389 

ROCHE, PAULINE R. 

1 Chatham Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

390 

ROUHOW, MIRIAM M. 

575 Fisher Street, Walpole, Massachusetts 

390 

SACCO, ANTHONY G. 

23 Bridge Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 

SHEEHAN, MARTHA A. 

64 Putnum Road, Somerv'iUe, Massachusetts 

SLUBEN, RICHARD J. 

230 Walnut St., Newtonville, Massachusetts 

390 

SOUSA, HELEN 

120 Holcott Drive, Attleboro, Massachusetts 

STELLA, CARMEN 

7 Brookside Drive, Foxboro, Massachusetts 

390 

SULLIVAN, GABRIELLE 

110 Putnam Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

390 



SULLIVAN, THOMAS J, 

24 Addington Rd., Brookline, Massachusetts 

390 

THOMPSON, RAYMOND P. 

6 Hampshire Circle, Hudson, Massachusetts 



VANGELL, THOMAS 

11 Governors Ave., Winchester, Mass. 

VON JESS, WILMA C 

100 Arlington St., W. Acton, Massachusetts 

WALSH, MARGARET M. 

9 Claymont Ter., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

390 

WHITE, ROBERT M. 

78 Kenwood St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

YOCUM, JOHN S. 

33 Janet Road, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

390 



SCHOOL OF 
NURSING 

AHEARN, KATHLEEN M. 

8 Ossipee Rd., W. Somerville, Massachusetts 

359, 371 

BARBARA, DENISE M. 

225 Rinton St., Franklin Sq., L.I., N.Y. 

371,373, 381 

BARTER, MARY E. 

44 Welland Rd., Weymouth, Massachusetts 

371 

BELANGER, SHEILA A. 

41 Lincoln Ave., Winchendon, Mass. 

371 

BISHOP, MARY A. 

21 Wainwright St., Dorchester, Mass. 
260, 343, 371 

BRAULT, ROSE MARIE 

106l Pleasant St., Worcester, Massachusetts 

371 

BRODNER, CECELIA M. 

142 Granniss Rd., Orange, Connecticut 

371 

BURTON, PATRICIA R. 

32 Burke Street, S. Boston, Massachusetts 

371 

CHINES, MARIA C. 

57 Pinkert Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

371 

COLLINS, CLAUDIA S. 

104 Kenfield Lane, Waterbury, Connecticut 

145,371 

CONNOR, DIANE K. 

13 Belton Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
371 

COUGHLIN, JANE M, 

14 Highland Ave., Greenfield, Massachusetts 
371 



CURLEY, KATHLEEN P. 

141 DeMott Ave., Rockville Centre, N.Y. 

372 

CUSTEAU, KATHLEEN M. 

60 North Main Street, Homer, New York 

372 

DANSEREAU, JACQUELINE E. 

237 Query St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 

372 

DONOVAN, PATRICIA M. 

128 Farrington Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

372 

DRISCOLL, MARY ELLEN 

52 Boundary Road, Maiden, Massachusetts 

128, 142, 372 

DUMAS, PAULA M. 

Oxford Street, Auburn, Massachusetts 

372, 381 

ELKEVICH, DORIS G. 

276 Forest Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 
372 

EMBLER, MARGARET E. 

11 Watson Avenue, N. Haven, Connecticut 
15, 133, 372 

FAY, MARY S. 

1 34 Reedsdale Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

373 

FIT2MAURICE, JOAN B. 

122 Aberdeen Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

373 

FOLEY, GENEVIEVE V. 

54 Wood Haven Rd., Pawtucket, R.I. 

133, 145, 373 

GARITY, JOAN P. 

9 Tingley Road, E. Braintree, Massachusetts 

373 

GAUMONT, KATHLEEN M. 

20 Fifth Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

373 

GLASER, ANNE I. 

32 Maxfield St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

373 

GORMAN, MARY M. 

23 Emerson Road, Watertown, Massachusetts 

145,373 

HACKING, ELEANOR G. 

330 Hyde Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

373 

HALL, BARBARA L. 

107 Old Greene Road, Lewiston, Maine 

370, 374 

HAMMOND, PATRICIA W. 

17 Bellevue Place, New London, Connecticut 

374 

HEALY, VIRGINIA M. 

8 Pond Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

374 



HEFFERNAN, MARY A. 

74 Richard Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

374 



McCOLGAN, ROSEMARY E. 

135 Gushing Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

376 



PERRY, ANNE MARIE 

41 Julia Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

145, 379 



HERLIHY, MARYELLEN 

19 HoUis Street, Gambridge, Massachusetts 

374 



McENELLY, KATHRYN L. 

104 Reed Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 

256, 376 



PHALEN, ANNE M. 

78 Beech Street, Waterbury, Gonnecticut 

379 



HOLLAND, JEANNE M. 

79 Ravine Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

374 



McKENNA, ELIZABETH R. 

2 West 45th Street, New York, New York 

377 



PHILLIPS, DONNA M. 

96 Brooks Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

359, 379 



HORGAN, DOROTHY E. 

105 Addington Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

374 



McMANUS, EILEEN M. 

8 Fairview Avenue, Ridgefield, Gonnecticut 

377 



REDD, EVA MARIE 

1 Schuyler Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

379 



KARPAWICH, KATHRYN M. 

1 Goombs Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 

134,374 



McNAMARA, MARY E. 

629 E. 24th Street, Brooklyn, New York 

377 



RENZ, DONNA J. 

222 Hartsdale Ave., White Plains, N.Y. 

379 



KEEFFE, MARGARET E. 

14A Ave. Reine Elisabeth, Antwerp, Belgium 

375 



McNAMARA, MARY F. 

196 Blatchley Ave., New Haven, Gonnecticut 

377 



RILEY, ANN P. 

18 Richmond Avenue, Paterson, New Jersey 

375, 380 



KILEY, DOROTHY M. 

77 Patten Ave., Rockville Gentre, New York 

375 

KYLE, KATHLEEN F. 

29 Harvard Street, Whitman, Massachusetts 

375 

LALLAS, MARGERY B. 

175 Dartmouth Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

375 

LAPIERRE, JEANNINE C 

55 Fales Street, Gentral Falls, Rhode Island 

375 

LAVALLEE, ALMA T. 

104 Lenox Ave., Providence, Rhode Island 

375 

MAGGIAGOMO, BARBARA A. 

6 Hollins Drive, Granston, Rhode Island 

145, 370, 375 

MALONEY, JANE M. 

29 Waldo Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

375 

MANZI, IRENE M. 

96 Knox Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

376 

MARCHAND, GHERYL A. 

8 Glinton Ave., Ghelmsford, Massachusetts 

376 

MARONEY, KATHLEEN P. 

37 Lewis Street, SomerviUe, Massachusetts 

256, 260, 376 

MARTIN, MARGARET G. 

51 Thaxter Road, Newton, Massachusetts 

376 

MARTUCCI, HARRIET A. 

25 Willow Road, Nahant, Massachusetts 

376 

MATTHEWS, ANNE G. 

194 Linn Moore St., Hartford, Gonnecticut 

376 



MEEGAN, GAROLYN A. 

271 Oak St., Manchester, New Hampshire 

145,377 

MENDOLIA, GORINNE R. 

557 Ellsworth Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

145,377 

MURRAY, DENISE A. 

27 Apple Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

377 

MURRAY, KATHLEEN P. 

501 Bloomfield Ave., Caldwell, New Jersey 

377 

MUSIJ, ULANA N. 

34 Nesbit Ave., W. Hartford, Gonnecticut 

378 

OBRIEN, GAREN M. 

64 Cedar Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

370, 378 

O'CONNOR, ANNMARIE 

923 D wight Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

378 

OSKINIS, MARY-ANN 

430 Park Street, New Britain, Gonnecticut 

145,378 

PADLON, MARY E. 

27 Broadview Ave., Bellport, L.I., N.Y. 
378 

PATALANO, JANICE M. 

4 Field Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

378 

PELKEY, JOAN M. 

333 Bridge Street, Hamilton, Massachusetts 

379 

PERFETTO, ELAINE R. 

53 Towanda Dr., N. Providence, R.I. 

15, 379 

PERRON, DENISE M. 

51 Rural Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 

128, 370, 379 



ROBINSON, SHEILA A. 

97 Meridian Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 

15, 145, 164, 165, 324, 372, 380 

SCALZI, CYNTHIA C. 

2071 Huntington Tpke., Trumbull, Conn. 

380 

STEFANICK, SANDRA H. 

116 Troy Hills Rd., Whippany, New Jersey 

380 

SUCHNICKI, EMILIE F. 

93 Lexington Ave., N. Dartmouth, Mass. 

380 

TARAZEWICH, HELEN 

16 Wilson Street, Biddeford, Maine 

380 

THONIS, MARIE F. 

315 Fourth Street, Wheatland, California 

145, 380 

TILLEY, MARTHA 

58 Franklin St., Northampton, Massachusetts 

380 

TRIBBLE, MARTHA L. 
Nightingale, Jaffrey, New Hampshire 
145,381 

TRIFILO, LOUISE J. 

10 Montvale Road, Gardner, Massachusetts 

381 

TUSGHMANN, Valerie A. 

131 Marion Street, Paterson, New Jersey 

381 

TYNDALL, DOROTHY A. 

25 VanArsdale Place, Manhasset, New York 

381 

TYRRELL, CLAIRE M. 

336 Ridge Road, Orange, Connecticut 

WEAFER, CHRISTINE M. 

1 54 Manchester St., Mattapan, Massachusetts 

381 



WISOWATY, JUDITH A. 

15 Livingston Dr., Peabody, Massachusetts 

381 

YERBURGH, SUSAN M. 

221 Corey Street, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

381 

ZENOBI, DANIELLE A. 

80 Dwight Street, New Britain, Connecticut 
381 

GRADUATE 

SCHOOL 

OF NURSING 

ALLDRED, SR. BETTY D. 

736 Cambridge St., Brighton, Massachusetts 

383 

ARFFA, ELISSA B. 

15 Pleasant Pk. Rd., Sharon, Massachusetts 

ASHTON, SR. JUNE M. 

Nazareth Convent, Nazareth, Michigan 

BARRETT, PATRICIA E. 

35 Wilson Ave., Watertown, Massachusetts 

BEJGROWICZ, JOAN 

10 Chfford Lane, Adams, Massachusetts 

BELL, AUDREY 

18 Davis Avenue, Brookline, Mass. 

BISSONNETTE, ANNA M. 

85 Otis Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

383 

BISSONNETTE, GRACE B. 

17 Kendal Common Rd., Weston, Mass. 

BOSWELL, JEAN T. 

33 Westbourne Ter., Brookline, Mass. 

383 

BOULAY, DONNA-MARIE 

11 Middle Street., Dracut, Massachusetts 

BURRELL, THERESA R. 

120 Cranch Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

CALLAHAN, EILEEN 

3319 Englewood St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

144, 383 

CALLAHAN, MAUREEN 

408 Spratt Place, Utica, New York 

383 

CARROLL, SHEILA 

Lenox Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island 

CHANDLEY, P. SHANNON 

312 West Avenue, Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

383 

CICCOLINI, SYLVIA 

57 Granite Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

383 



CLIFFORD, ELEANOR 

47 Prudential Rd., Worcester, Massachusetts 

COFFEY, SHANNON M. 

148 Lincoln Street, Meriden, Connecticut 

CONDON, ANNA M. 

2 Catherine Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

COSGROVE, BARBARA A. 

53 Calvary Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

CRAWFORD, ELAINE A. 

79 Surrey Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

CRONAN, MARGARET B. 

22 Ferndale Avenue, Waterbury, Connecticut 

COTTER, ANNE M. 

23 Pleasant Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

CROUCH, SR. M. ELIZABETH 

Nazareth Convent, Nazareth, Michigan 

DEIGNAN, SARAH A. 

162 School Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 

383 

DONNA, MARY E. 

40 Weld Hill St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

DRISCOLL, CAROL A. 

1601 Phenix Ave., Cranston, Rhode Island 

DRISDELL, CAROLE A. 

291 Phillips Ave., New Bedford, Mass. 

DUANE, JOAN M. 

7 Frawley Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

383 

DUNN, DOROTHY 

Lantern Road, Smithfield, Rhode Island 

ETZEL, TARA 

521 East 19th Street, Brooklyn, New York 

FAY, SR. M. CHRISTINE 

Providence Mother House, Holyoke, Mass. 

383 

FOGARTY, MARGERY A. 

Saw Mill Road, Harmony, Rhode Island 

FOLEY, ELIZABETH M. 

2 Highview Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 
383 

FOLEY, K. MAUREEN 

5 Ash Street, N. Walpole, New Hampshire 

GALLAGHER, THERESA, A 

92 Court St., Newtonville, Massachusetts 

GILHOOLY, ELEANOR A. 

513 Sylvan Avenue, Waterbury, Connecticut 

GRONKI, MADELIENE M. 

1308 E. 35th Street, Baltimore, Maryland 

GROOM, CAMILLE D. 

100-02 159th Ave., Howard Beach, N.Y. 

HANLEY, BARBARA E. 

56 Farragut Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 

383 



HOBBS, VELMA H. 

118 S. Walker Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

HOWELL, BARBARA 

12 Orchard Lane, Wayland, Massachusetts 

JOHNSON, ANNE 

49 Long Ave., Framingham, Massachusetts 

KAMINSKY, BARBARA R. 

316 Washington Rd., Thompsonville, Conn. 

384 

KANE, MONICA 

38 Paris Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

KAPURCH, JUNE A. 

8 Orrison Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

KARPECK, DONNA M. 

8 Pitt Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

KAZLASKAS, CAROL A. 

2 Brookview Avenue, Dracut, Massachusetts 

KEANE, SARAH A. 

223 Farrington Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

384 

KETTERER, SR. JUNE LOUISE 

736 Cambridge St., Brighton, Massachusetts 

384 

KYRCZ, BARBARA JANE 

7 Lothian Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

384 

LAPREY, ELIZABETH F. 

65 Federal Street, Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

LOUGHLIN, JANE M. 

12 Marion Avenue, Glens Falls, New York 

382, 384 

LOVE, ARLINE F. 

55 Beaumont Street, Canton, Massachusetts 

144 

LYNCH, SR. M. ANTONIUS 
Teaneck Road, Teaneck, New Jersey 



MACKIE, BARBARA A. 

78 Otrobando Ave., Norwich, Connecticut 

384 

MARCHESE, JUDITH A. 

171 Overlook Rd., Arlington, Massachusetts 

MARCOLINI, LINDA A. 

78 Springfield Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

MASSICOTTE, ADELE R. 

40 Green Avenue, Norwich, Connecticut 

384 

McCarthy, jeanne m. 

933 Greendale Ave., Needham, Mass. 

mcgee, dona a, 

7 Claremont Street, E. Hartford, Connecticut 
384 

MELLOY, MARGARET M. 

1 1 1 Oxford Place, Staten Island, New York 



MICHAUD, JANICE A. 

8 Bostonia Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 

MILLIGAN, ANNE E. 

33 Bradford Street, Needham, Massachusetts 

MITCHELL, JOY-ANN 

16 Burroughs Rd., W. Acton, Massachusetts 

MOLNAR, AGNES 

41 Frederick Place, Morristown, New Jersey 

MOLINO, CAROL JEAN 

61 Longfellow Ave., Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

144, 384 



RASICOT, CALLISTA A. 

141 Beach 124 St., Belle Harbor, New York 

384 

REVIER, SR. PAUL 

St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, Minnesota 

RODERICK, BARBARA M. 

305B Blueledge Dr., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

ROTH, MARY ANNE 

90 Church Street, Westwood, Massachusetts 

RYAN, MARY E. 

3 Orchard Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 



MULLEN, GRACE W. 

47 Leonard Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 



RYAN, PAULA J. 

116 Sheridan Ave., Medford, Massachusetts 



MURPHY, LOIS M. 

79 Gladeside Ave., Mattapan, Massachusetts 

MURPHY, MARY A. 

6 Poplar Street, Hudson Falls, New York 

O'BRIEN, CAROL R. 

186 Doyle Road, Holden, Massachusetts 

384 

O'GRADY, PATRICIA R. 

127 Patterson Road, Bedford, Massachusetts 

O'NEIL, MARIE R. 

286 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

O'NEILL, MARY R. 

113 Rockland Street, Canton, Massachusetts 

O'SHEA, MARY J. 

2630 Marion Avenue, New York, New York 

PLUNKETT, JANICE D. 

30 Surfside Road, Lynn, Massachusetts 

POLISSAR, JUDITH C. 

22 Miralosma Dr., San Francisco, Calif. 

PRITHAM, ELLEN B. (DAVIS) 

21 Park Vale Ave., Brighton, Massachusetts 

PROVOST, MURIEL E. 

28 Vernon Road, Natick, Massachusetts 



SANTOPIETRO, MARIA L. 

15 Fairbanks St., Providence, Rhode Island 

385 

SARANTIS, JACQUELINE 

1662 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

SEAMAN, JEAN A. 

6 Gladys Road, Brockton, Massachusetts 

385 

SKOWRONSKI, EILEEN F. 

107 Prospect Street, Ansonia, Connecticut 

385 

SMITH, CAROL A. 

39 Shepard Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

SMITH, MARY H. 

1107 State Street, Utica, New York 

385 

SULLIVAN, MARY E. 

54 Nelson Avenue, Waterbury, Connecticut 

TYRRELL, SR. MARGUERITE 

155 Hefferson Street, Newark, New Jersey 

385 

WARD, BARBARA H. 

Wigmor Street, Riverside, Connecticut 



PYNE, KATHLEEN 

E. Hyatt Avenue, Mt, Kiscoe, New York 



YACHIMSKI, PHYLLIS 

47 Nelson Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 



GENERAL INDEX 



Accounting Department 34 

Alpha and Omega 144 

Alpha Kappa Psi 156 

Alpha Sigma Nu 145 

Apartment Living 250-253 

Artist-in-Residence 246-247 

Arts and Sciences Administration 24-25 

Arts and Sciences Student Senate 125 

Band 136-137 

Baseball 217-221 

Basketball 196-207 

Beta Gamma Sigma 143 

Biology Department 36-37 

Business Law Department 35 

Campus Council 124 

Cheerleaders 224 

Chemistry Department 38-39 

Circle K 152 

Classics Department 42 

CBA Administration 26-27 

CBA Student Senate 126 

Cosmos 155 

Council for Exceptional Children 152 

Council of Resident Men 130 

Delta Sigma Pi 151 

Dramatic Society 146-147 

Dramatic Productions 248-249 

E.C.A.C. Holiday Festival 228-229 

Economics Department 40-41 

Education Administration 28-29 

Education Department 43-46 

Education Student Senate 127 

Education Skits 258-259 

English Department 47-49 

Evening College Administration 32 

Evening College Student Senate 129 

Featured Performers 242-244 

Featured Speakers 240-241 

Finance Department 50 

Fine Arts Department 51 

Football 170-183 

Fulton Debating Society 154 

Geology Department 54 

Gold Key Society 148-149 

Graduates 265-392 

The Heights 159-161 

History Department 52-53 

Hockey 184-195 

Homecoming 255-257 

Humanities l63 



Inter-Departmental Program 55-56 

John Austin Night 227 

journal Of Business l62 

Junior Week 234-239 

Junior Year Abroad 245 

Knights of Columbus 153 

Lay Apostolate 142 

Lewis Drill Team i4l 

Marketing Department 57 

Mater Spei 144 

Mathematics Department 58-59 

Military Ball 262-263 

Military Science Department 62 

Modern Language Department 60-61 

N.LT. Basketball 229-233 

Nursing Administration 30-31 

Nursing Department 63-66 

Nursing Student Senate 128 

Order of the Cross and Crown l4l ' 

Philosophy Department 67-69 

Physics Department 70 

Political Clubs 156-157 

Political Science Department 71 

Production Department 72 

Psychology Department 73 

Rifle Team 223 

R.O.T.C 138-139 

Sailing Team 215 

Scholars of the College l40 

Seventy Hours 254 

Sienna Society 145 

Soccer Team 222 

Sociology Department 74 

Sodality 132-133 

Speech Department 75 

Snooks Kelly Night 227 

The Stylus 163 

The Sub Turri 164-168 

Theology Department 76-77 

Track 208-215 

University Administration 18-23 

University Chorale 134-135 

Winter Weekend 260-261 

WRA 131 

Wrestling 216 

WVBC 158 



446 



THE 1966 SUB TURRI STAFF 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
Thomas P. Torrisi 



MANAGING EDITOR 
Thomas M. Wells 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Christian H. Eidt 



SENIOR EDITOR 
John Went 



LITERARY EDITOR 
Sheila Robinson 



INDEX EDITOR 
Paul C. Marshall 



ACTIVITIES EDITORS 
Patricia Hanna 
David Calchera 



LAYOUT EDITORS 
Edward P. Dalton 
Albert D. Alberi 



ACADEMIC EDITORS 
P. Michael Lahan 
Christian Hoffman 



PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 
John J. Lambert, Jr. 



FEATURES EDITOR 
Richard McCarthy 



SPORTS EDITOR 

Henry Steadman 



ARTISTS 

Lawrence Waurin 
Kathleen Gaumant 



LAYOUT STAFF 
Charles Weschler 
William F. Zak 



UNDERCLASS EDITOR 
James Peters 



PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF 

James Peters 

Roger Pelissier 

N. Peter Osmond 

Joseph Navin 

Chris Eidt 

Kathleen Dalton 

Janis Zinno 

Patricia Currie 

Kathleen Ferrero 



BUSINESS STAFF 
Gerard T. Kennealey 
Edward Reardon 
Richard Farricker 
Joseph Mancini 
Ray Peckham 
John J. Nannicelli 
Ronald G. Makara 



MODERATOR 

Rev. John P. McNamara, S.J. 



A Final Word . . . 



At long last, the fifty-fourth edition of the Sub Turri 
is finished. It has been a long and difficult year, but one 
filled with many personal thrills and memorable mo- 
ments. It has been a very gratifying year, and certainly 
one never to be forgotten. It has been a year of hard work, 
anguish and, at times, near despair. But after the storm 
. . . the 1966 Sub Turri now belongs to you. 

This year, as in past years, the staff has set its sights 
high hoping to bring to you one of the finest yearbooks 
produced at Boston College. Their aim was to produce 
a truly memorable record of your stay here at the 
Heights. This, I feel, has been accomplished. We do 
have in our possession, now, a vivid pictorial review of 
our days long spent at Boston College. 

As you might suspect, the primary problem facing 
any staff is the physical makeup of the book. One 
realizes that in order to create the desired effect, you 
must correlate both your picture content and layout. 
You must adapt your paper stock to the type ink and 
print that goes into the makeup of the text. To add to 
this, you must have a photography staff who is capable 
of choosing the proper type film for each individual situ- 
ation. Yes, the physical aspect is of primary importance. 

I feel that we have come extremely close to the 
achievement of the perfect combination. The stock used 
in this text has been specially designed for Boston 
College by the Mohawk Paper Company of New York. 
It is termed 80 lb. Mohawk Superfine. The ink is a 
special blend of the black and red, something that has 
never been attempted before at Boston College, and 
something that is relatively new in the field of yearbooks 
in general. After much deliberation, we decided to use 
Garamond as our main typeface. All through the book 
we varied our size so that it ranged from 8 point to 60 
point. One more very important point in the physical 
makeup of the book might point out that we used 
several types of Kodak black and white film for the 
main body of the book and Kodak Tri-X Pan Safety 
film and Kodak High Speed Ektachrome film in the 
color section of the book. 

This is all fine, but the true quality cannot be meas- 
ured just by its physical makeup. One must look beneath 
the surface to judge the true worth of any publication. 
One must look to the people directly and indirectly 
involved in the production of the book. 

The most logical place to begin giving credit is at 
home. I would like to thank each and every member of 



this year's staff for truly an all out effort. In my opinion 
they have all shown true dedication, not only to a great 
organization, but also to a great school, and it is people 
like this who really are responsible for Boston College 
being what and where it is today. They were ready at 
a moment's notice to give whatever was asked of them. 
I would like to thank at this time New England 
Yearbooks of Waltham, Massachusetts who did the 
printing of the book, and their representative, Mr. 
Douglas Mitchell. If it weren't for this gentleman, we 
could never have achieved the quality we did. My 
thanks go out to all the personnel at the Warren Kay 
Vantine Studios of Boston who were responsible for 
the portraits in the Senior section of the book. Father 
McNamara, who has served his last year as yearbook 
advisor, exercised his office in a manner truly deserving 
of praise. To say that he was an asset in the financial 
aspect of the operation would be of itself an under- 
statement. He was extremely cooperative and under- 
standing, yet when it was necessary, he served as a 
barrier. The Registrar of the University, Father Fitz- 
gerald, and the individual College Registrars once again 
proved to be invaluable in keeping us supplied with 
vital information about the students. Father Galvin, 
Director of McElroy Commons was very sympathetic to 
our late requests whenever a deadline was approaching. 
Mr. John Lamer, Public Relations Director for the 
University, kept us supplied with the necessary facts of 
the University, whether it was a name or a date or what 
have you. Eddie Miller, Director of Sports Publicity was 
of invaluable assistance from getting photography 
passes right down to helping the staff institute a brand 
new annual athletic award. The Frank Jones Memorial 
Trophy to be given to the Winter Sports athlete who 
best typifies the traditions of dedication exemplified by 
Frank Jones in his forty years at Boston College. One 
cannot end a thank you without giving recognition to 
those who made the whole venture financially possible. 
It is to the Patrons and Advertisers that I give a special 
thank you. 

This just scratches the surface. The hands involved 
in bringing this book to you have just been too many. 
It really is a gratifying thing to behold, as you see so 
many people ready and willing to give you a helping 
hand at a moment's notice. To everyone, I give you my 
sincere thanks for a job well done. 

Thomas P. Torrisi 
Editor-in-Chief